Little shrikethrush

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Little shrikethrush
Little Shrike-thrush.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Pachycephalidae
Genus: Colluricincla
Species: C. megarhyncha
Binomial name
Colluricincla megarhyncha
(Quoy & Gaimard, 1830)
Synonyms
  • Muscicapa megarhyncha
  • Myialestes megarhynchus
  • Myiolestes aruensis
  • Myiolestes megarhynchos
  • Pinarolestes megarhynchos
  • Pinarolestes megarhynchus

The little shrikethrush (Colluricincla megarhyncha) is a species of bird in the family Pachycephalidae.

Taxonomy and systematics[edit]

The little shrikethrush was originally described in the genus Muscicapa and was subsequently classified by some authorities within the genus Pinarolestes. Genetic investigations of New Guinea populations of the little shrikethrush indicate high levels of genetic divergence, suggesting it may comprise more than one species.[2] With at least eight separate clades identified as potential species splits, further research may lead to the re-classification of several new species. Alternate names for the little shrikethrush include the brown shrike-flycatcher and rufous shrike-thrush.

Subspecies[edit]

Currently, twenty subspecies are recognized:[3]

  • C. m. affinis - (Gray, GR, 1862): Originally described as a separate species. Found on Waigeo (off western New Guinea)
  • C. m. batantae - (Meise, 1929): Found on Batanta (off western New Guinea)
  • C. m. megarhyncha - (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830): Found on Salawati and Misool (off northwestern New Guinea), Aru Islands (off southwestern New Guinea) and New Guinea
  • C. m. despecta - (Rothschild & Hartert, 1903): Found on southern coast of south-eastern New Guinea
  • C. m. superflua - (Rothschild & Hartert, 1912): Found on northern coast of south-eastern New Guinea
  • C. m. neos - (Mayr, 1931): Found in eastern New Guinea.
  • C. m. tappenbecki - Reichenow, 1898: Originally described as a separate species. Found in north-central New Guinea to Astrolabe Bay (north-eastern New Guinea)
  • C. m. maeandrina - (Stresemann, 1921): Found in east-central New Guinea
  • C. m. idenburgi - (Rand, 1940): Found in east-central New Guinea
  • C. m. obscura - (Meyer, AB, 1874): Originally described as a separate species in the genus Rectes. Found on Yapen (off northwestern New Guinea)
  • C. m. melanorhyncha - (Meyer, AB, 1874): Originally described as a separate species. Found on Biak (off northwestern New Guinea)
  • C. m. fortis - (Gadow, 1883): Originally described as a separate species in the genus Pachycephala. Found on D'Entrecasteaux Archipelago and the Trobriand Islands (off southeastern New Guinea)
  • C. m. discolor - De Vis, 1890: Originally described as a separate species. Found on Tagula Island (Louisiade Archipelago)
  • C. m. parvula - Gould, 1845: Originally described as a separate species. Found in north-eastern Western Australia and northern Northern Territory (Australia)
  • C. m. aelptes - Schodde & Mason, 1976: Found in north-eastern Northern Territory (Australia)
  • C. m. normani - (Mathews, 1914): Found in northern Queensland and islands in the Torres Strait (Australia)
  • C. m. griseata - (Gray, GR, 1858): Originally described as a separate species. Found in north-eastern Queensland (Australia)
  • C. m. synaptica - Schodde & Mason, 1999: Found from southern Halifax Bay south to Sarina (north-eastern Australia)
  • C. m. gouldii - (Gray, GR, 1858): Originally described as a separate species. Found from Broad Bay south to Hervey Bay (north-eastern Australia)
  • C. m. rufogaster - Gould, 1845: Originally described as a separate species. Found in south-eastern Queensland and north-eastern New South Wales (eastern Australia)

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It is found in Australia and New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.[1]

Behaviour and ecology[edit]

During a study of the toxicity of the genus Pitohui, two specimens of this species were tested. One of these specimens contained traces of batrachotoxins (BTXs) similar to those found in the secretions of Central and South American poison dart frogs.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b BirdLife International (2016). "Colluricincla megarhyncha". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2016.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  2. ^ Deiner, Kristy; Lemmon, Alan R.; Mack, Andrew L.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Dumbacher, John P. (2011). "A Passerine Bird's Evolution Corroborates the Geologic History of the Island of New Guinea". PLoS. 6 (5): e19479. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0019479. 
  3. ^ "IOC World Bird List 6.3". IOC World Bird List Datasets. doi:10.14344/ioc.ml.6.3. 
  4. ^ Avian chemical defense: Toxic birds not of a feather

External links[edit]