Rugby (UK Parliament constituency)

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Rugby
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Rugby in Warwickshire for the 2010 general election.
Outline map
Location of Warwickshire within England.
County Warwickshire
Electorate 69,932 (December 2010)[1]
Current constituency
Created 2010
Member of parliament Mark Pawsey (Conservative)
Number of members One
Created from Rugby & Kenilworth
18851983
Number of members One
Replaced by Rugby & Kenilworth and Nuneaton[2]
Created from North Warwickshire
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency West Midlands

Rugby is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since its 2010 recreation by Mark Pawsey, a Conservative.[n 2]

History[edit]

1885-1918: The Petty Sessional Divisions of Rugby, Southam, Burton Dassett and Kingston, and Kenilworth (except the parishes of Lillington and Milverton).

1918-1945: The Rural Districts of Farnborough, Monks Kirby, Rugby and Southam, the Rural District of Brailes (except the parishes of Ilmington and Stretton-on-Fosse), the parishes of Charlcote, Combrook, Compton Verney, Eatington, Kineton, Loxley, Moreton Morrell, Newbold Pacey, Wellesbourne Hastings and Wellesbourne Mountford in the Rural District of Stratford-on-Avon, and the Urban District of Rugby.

1945-1950:

1950-1974: The Municipal Borough of Rugby and the Rural District of Rugby.

1974-1983: The borough of Rugby and the rural district of Rugby as altered by The West Midlands Order 1965 and The Coventry Order 1965.

2010-: The Borough of Nuneaton and Bedworth ward of Bulkington, and the Borough of Rugby wards of Admirals, Avon and Swift, Benn, Bilton, Brownsover North, Brownsover South, Caldecott, Earl Craven and Wolston, Eastlands, Fosse, Hillmorton, Lawford and King's Newnham, New Bilton, Newbold, Overslade, Paddox, and Wolvey.

Boundaries[edit]

Historic boundaries

When first created in 1885, the Rugby division consisted of the Petty Sessional Divisions of Rugby, Southam, Burton Dassett and Kington, and Kenilworth except the parishes of Lillington and Milverton. The division as recommended by the Boundary Commissioners had a population of 49,291 in the 1881 Census.[3]

Boundary changes in 1918 expanded the constituency to the south, while removing some areas near Leamington Spa. The constituency was defined as consisting of the Urban District of Rugby, the Rural Districts of Farnborough, Monks Kirby, Rugby and Southam, together with the majority of Brailes Rural district (excepting only the two parishes of Ilmington and Stretton-on-Fosse which were in a detached part of Warwickshire). Finally, the division included several parishes which were in the east of Stratford-on-Avon Rural District: Charlcote, Combrook, Compton Verney, Eatington, Kineton, Loxley, Moreton Morrell, Newbold Pacey, Wellesbourne Hastings and Wellesbourne Mountford.[4]

When changes were made to constituency boundaries in 1945 to split up some extremely large constituencies, Rugby was affected by the recommendations made as a result of the growth in electorate in the Coventry constituency. It gained some areas to the east of Coventry which had already been added to Rugby Rural District but were previously part of Nuneaton division. This change added about 2,000 voters.[5] The constituency was considerably reduced in area in boundary changes which came into effect in 1950, being reduced to simply the Municipal Borough of Rugby and the Rural District of Rugby.[6] No alteration in boundaries was made as part of the First Periodical Review of Boundaries in 1954,[7] and in the Second Periodical Review which came into effect in 1974, the definition remained the same although changes in local government boundaries meant that a minor change was made.[8]

The Third Periodical Review of constituency boundaries expanded the Rugby constituency to the west. The constituency lost 6,545 of its 60,909 electors, in and around the villages of Ansty and Wolvey, to Nuneaton. It then gained 16,600 electors from Kenilworth, resulting in its renaming as Rugby and Kenilworth.[9]

Current boundaries

Parliament accepted the Boundary Commission's Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies which slightly altered this constituency for the 2010 general election since which it has electoral wards:

  • Admirals; Avon and Swift; Benn; Bilton; Brownsover North; Brownsover South; Caldecott; Earl Craven and Wolston; Eastlands; Fosse; Hillmorton; Lawford and King’s Newnham; New Bilton; Newbold; Overslade; Paddox; Wolvey. in Rugby Borough
  • Bulkington in the Borough of Nuneaton and Bedworth.[10][11]

Constituency profile[edit]

The constituency consists of Census Output Areas of two local government districts with similar characteristics and that forming the bulk has a working population whose income is slightly above to the national average and lower than average reliance upon social housing.[12] At the end of 2012 the unemployment rate in the constituency stood as 2.3% of the population claiming jobseekers allowance, compared to the regional average of 4.4%.[13]

The borough contributing to the bulk of the seat has a quite low 17.5% of its population without a car, 19.6% of the population without qualifications contrasted with a high 28.2% with level 4 qualifications or above by way of illustration. In terms of tenure 69.5% of homes are owned outright or on a mortgage as at the 2011 census across the district.[14]

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1885–1983[edit]

Event Member[15] Party
1885 Henry Peyton Cobb Liberal
1895 Richard Greville Verney[n 3] Conservative
1900 Corrie Grant Liberal
Jan 1910 John Lawrence Baird Conservative
1922 Euan Wallace Conservative
1923 Ernest Brown Liberal
1924 David Margesson Conservative
1942 by-election William Brown Independent
1950 James Johnson Labour
1959 Roy Wise Conservative
1966 William Price Labour
1979 Jim Pawsey Conservative
1983 constituency abolished

MPs since 2010[edit]

Election Member[15] Party
2010 Mark Pawsey Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015[16][17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Pawsey 24,040 49.1 +5.0
Labour Claire Edwards 13,695 27.9 -3.5
UKIP Gordon Davies 6,855 14.0 +13.1
Liberal Democrat Ed Goncalves 2,776 5.8 -14.1
Green Terry White 1,415 2.9 +1.9
TUSC Peter McLaren 225 0.5 N/A
Majority 10,345 21.1 +8.5
Turnout 49,006 70.1 +1.2
Conservative hold Swing +4.25
General Election 2010[19][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Pawsey 20,901 44.0 N/A
Labour Andy King 14,901 31.4 N/A
Liberal Democrat Jerry Roodhouse 9,434 19.9 N/A
BNP Mark Badrick 1,375 2.9 N/A
Green Roy Sandison 451 1.0 N/A
UKIP Barry Milford 406 0.9 N/A
Majority 6,000 12.6 N/A
Turnout 47,468 68.9 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Jim Pawsey 24,417 47.3 +10.0
Labour William George Price 21,688 42.0 -6.2
Liberal B. Lomax 4,945 9.6 -4.7
National Front A. Gresham 551 1.0 N/A
Majority 2,729 5.3 -5.6
Turnout 51,603 83.9 +4.1
Conservative gain from Labour Swing
General Election October 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour William George Price 22,926 48.2 -1.3
Conservative Antony Rivers Marlow 17,722 37.3 -0.1
Liberal A. Butcher 6,775 14.3 +1.4
Social Credit Archie S Frost 137 0.3 +0.1
Majority 5,204 10.9 -1.2
Turnout 47,560 79.8 -6.4
Labour hold Swing
General Election February 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour William George Price 25,176 49.5 -3.4
Conservative Tim Boswell 19,022 37.4 -9.2
Liberal J. Campbell 6,560 12.9 N/A
Social Credit Archie S Frost 106 0.2 -0.3
Majority 6,154 12.1 -5.9
Turnout 50,884 86.2 +4.4
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1970: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour William George Price 25,041 52.8 +2.8
Conservative J.H.P. Griffith 22,086 46.6 -2.4
Social Credit Archie S Frost 254 0.5 -0.4
Majority 2,955 6.2 +5.3
Turnout 47,381 81.8 -3.1
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour William George Price 21,797 50.0 +8.8
Conservative Alfred Roy Wise 21,388 49.0 +3.9
Social Credit Archie S Frost 397 0.9 +0.2
Majority 409 0.9 -3.1
Turnout 43,579 84.9 +0.3
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
General Election 1964: Rugby[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Alfred Roy Wise 19,221 45.1 +2.5
Labour D.H. Childs 17,532 41.2 -0.2
Liberal Simon Goldblatt 5,522 13.0 -2.7
Social Credit Archie S Frost 304 0.7 N/A
Majority 1,689 4.0 +2.8
Turnout 42,580 84.6 -1.0
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Rugby[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Alfred Roy Wise 17,429 42.6 -4.0
Labour James Johnson 16,959 41.4 -8.7
Liberal Simon Goldblatt 6,413 15.7 N/A
Independent Archie S Frost 142 0.4 N/A
Majority 470 1.2 -2.3
Turnout 40,924 85.6 +0.2
Conservative gain from Labour Swing
General Election 1955: Rugby[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Johnson 19,709 50.1 -0.2
Conservative Harold Benjamin Soref 18,331 46.6 -3.2
Independent Eric H Shafer 1,274 3.2 N/A
Majority 1,378 3.5 +3.0
Turnout 39,293 85.4 -2.3
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1951: Rugby[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Johnson 19,995 50.3 +0.3
Conservative Cyril AG Dance 19,796 49.7 +11.4
Majority 199 0.5 -2.2
Turnout 39,808 87.7 -0.5
Labour hold Swing
General Election 1950: Rugby [25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour James Johnson 15,983 50.0 +27.3
Conservative J. Dance 14,947 38.3 +1.6
Independent William John Brown 8,080 20.7 -19.7
Majority 1,036 2.7 -0.7
Turnout 39,009 88.2 +14.6
Labour gain from Independent Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Rugby [26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent William John Brown 18,615 40.4 -11.4
Conservative John Lakin 17,049 37.0 -11.2
Labour Ronald Howard Lewis 10,470 22.7 n/a
Majority 1,566 3.4 -0.2
Turnout 46,144 73.6 +35.1
Independent hold Swing -0.1
Rugby by-election, 1942[27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent William John Brown 9,824 51.8 n/a
Conservative Sir Claude Vivian Holbrook 9,145 48.2 -13.3
Majority 679 3.6 n/a
Turnout 18,969 38.5 -35.3
Independent gain from Conservative Swing

General Election 1939/40:

Another general election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General Election 1935: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry David Reginald Margesson 20,905 61.6
Labour H William Fenner 13,061 38.5
Majority 7,844 23.1
Turnout 33,966 73.8
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry David Reginald Margesson 24,493 69.95
Labour Edward J. Pay 10,523 30.05
Majority 13,970 39.90
Turnout 78.93
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Henry David Reginald Margesson 15,147 41.1 -9.1
Labour John Morgan 11,588 31.4 +18.3
Liberal Robert Hamilton Bernays 10,158 27.5 -9.1
Majority 9.7 -3.9
Turnout 36,893
Unionist hold Swing -13.7
General Election 1924: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Henry David Reginald Margesson 14,434 50.2
Liberal Alfred Ernest Brown 10,524 36.6
Labour H Yates 3,768 13.1
Majority 13.6
Turnout 28,726
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing
General Election 1923: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Alfred Ernest Brown 13,798
Unionist David Euan Wallace 11,286
Majority
Turnout
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing
General Election 1922: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist David Euan Wallace 11,934
Liberal Hon. Arthur George Villiers Peel 8,196
Labour T H Holt-Hughes 4,940
Majority
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General Election 1918: Rugby
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist 11,325
Liberal Oscar Frederick Maclagan 7,399
Majority
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing
  • endorsed by Coalition Government

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Craig, F. W. S. (1983). British parliamentary election results 1918-1949 (3 ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. ISBN 0-900178-06-X.

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ Before birthright succession to the Lords as Baron Willoughby de Broke
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "'Rugby', Feb 1974 - May 1983". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Retrieved 24 March 2016. 
  3. ^ "County of Warwick" in "Report of the Boundary Commissioners for England Wales, 1885" (C.-4287), vol I p. 165-7.
  4. ^ "39. County of Warwick" in "Report of the Boundary Commission (England and Wales)", Cd. 8757, vol II.
  5. ^ "Report in regard to the division of abnormally large Constituencies named in the Second Schedule to the Act", Boundary Commission for England, Cmd. 6634, p. 35-37.
  6. ^ Initial Report of the Boundary Commission for England, Cmd. 7260, p. 48.
  7. ^ "First Periodical Report", Boundary Commission for England, Cmd. 9311, p. 37.
  8. ^ F. W. S. Craig, "Boundaries of British Parliamentary Constituencies 1885–1972", Political Reference Publications, Chichester, 1972, p. 144.
  9. ^ "The BBC/ITN Guide to the New Parliamentary Constituencies", Parliamentary Research Services, 1983, pp. 114, 214.
  10. ^ Colin Rallings, Michael Thrasher, "Media Guide to the New Parliamentary Constituencies", University of Plymouth, 2007, p. 139.
  11. ^ 2010 post-revision map non-metropolitan areas and unitary authorities of England
  12. ^ 2001 Census
  13. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  14. ^ 2011 census interactive maps
  15. ^ a b Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "R" (part 2)[self-published source][better source needed]
  16. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  17. ^ Kimber, Richard. "UK General Election results May 2015". Political Science Resources. Retrieved 24 March 2016. 
  18. ^ "Rugby Parliamentary constituency". Election 2015. BBC. Retrieved 24 March 2016. 
  19. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  20. ^ "UK > England > West Midlands > Rugby". Election 2010. BBC. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 12 May 2010. 
  21. ^ [1]
  22. ^ [2]
  23. ^ [3]
  24. ^ [4]
  25. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1950-1973; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949
  26. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949
  27. ^ F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949

Coordinates: 52°24′N 1°21′W / 52.40°N 1.35°W / 52.40; -1.35