Rukmini Maria Callimachi

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Rukmini Callimachi
Born (1973-06-25) 25 June 1973 (age 43)
Bucharest, Romania
Education Dartmouth College
Exeter College, Oxford
Occupation Journalist

Rukmini Maria Callimachi (born 25 June 1973)[1] is a Romanian-American journalist.

Life[edit]

She left Romania during the communist regime with her mother and grandmother, for Switzerland and then the United States, where she attended The Oak Grove School in Ojai, California. She graduated from Dartmouth College, and from Exeter College, Oxford, with a masters in linguistics. In 2000, she co-led the Royal Geographical Society's expedition to Tibet. She got her name "Rukmini" through her family's closeness to the Indian theosophist Rukmini Devi Arundale, founder of Kalakshetra Foundation in Chennai, India.[2]

Career[edit]

She began as a freelancer in New Delhi, India including for Time magazine, then joined the Associated Press in Portland, Oregon, in 2003. After a year in New Orleans documenting the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, she began reporting out of Dakar, Senegal, as a West African correspondent for The AP in late 2006.[3] In 2014, she was hired by The New York Times.[4] Her reporting focuses on Islamic extremism.[5]

Callimachi began her writing career by writing poetry and was published in The American Scholar, Oxford Poetry,[6] and Black Warrior Review,[7] but realized it was "a totally dead-end street as a career."[8] She has said, in an interview with Slate in 2016, that she shifted her focus from poetry to journalism and prose writing.[Note 1]

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

Poetry[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ My formation as a writer was as a poet. I tried very early on to be a poet and I published about a dozen poems in America and in American journals before I realized that this was a totally dead-end street as a career. ... I almost completely stopped writing poetry when I started writing prose. Annoyingly, my Wikipedia page also identifies me as a poet. I have no idea how one goes about changing those things.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mihaiescu, Marlus. "Rukmini Callimachi - jurnalista americana de origine romana - nominalizata la premiile Pulitzer". HotNews.ro. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Rukmini Callimachi-Rukmini Arundale". Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Pascariu, Roxana. "Rukmini Callimachi: Pulitzer Finalist 2009". The Romanian Office. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  4. ^ Calderone, Michael (27 February 2014). "AP's Rukmini Callimachi Joins The New York Times". Huffington Post. Retrieved 26 October 2014. 
  5. ^ Rukmini CallimachiVerified account. "Rukmini Callimachi (@rcallimachi)". Twitter. Retrieved 2017-05-23. 
  6. ^ Callimachi, Ruckmini. "Oxford Poetry Vol X No 3: Rus et Urbs (Summer 1999)". webpage. demon.co.uk. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  7. ^ "Index of Authors". webpage. Black Warrior Review. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Chotnier, Isaac. "The ISIS Correspondent". Slate. Retrieved 12 July 2016. 
  9. ^ "Aurora Prize: The New York Times reporter receives Integrity in Journalism Award". News.am. April 24, 2016. Retrieved April 25, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Finalist: Rukmini Maria Callimachi". Archived from the original on 20 April 2009. Retrieved 30 August 2009. 
  11. ^ "Rukmini Callimachi". Archived from the original on 2 December 2012. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Writing Award". Ball State University. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "Pulitzer Prize Finalists 2009". Pulitzer.org. Retrieved 30 August 2009. 
  14. ^ "Sidney Hillman Foundation Awards —". Infoplease.com. 2 April 2007. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Previous RNA Contest Winners". Rna.org. 4 February 2013. Retrieved 30 August 2009. 

External links[edit]