Rupert Bruce-Mitford

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Rupert Bruce-Mitford
Rupert Bruce-Mitford.jpg
Born 14 June 1914
Streatham, London, England
Died 10 March 1994(1994-03-10) (aged 79)
Oxford, England
Nationality English
Occupation Archaeologist
Spouse(s) Kathleen Dent (m.1941–1972), Marilyn Luscombe (m.1975–1984), Margaret Adams (m.1988–1994)
Children one son, two daughters
Parent(s) Charles Eustace Bruce-Mitford and Beatrice Allison
Signature
Rupert Bruce-Mitford - Signature.svg

Rupert Leo Scott Bruce-Mitford, FBA, FSA (surname sometimes Mitford) (14 June 1914 – 10 March 1994) was a British archaeologist and scholar, best known for his multi-volume publication on the Sutton Hoo ship burial. He was also a noted academic as the Slade Professor of Fine Art at Cambridge University from 1978 to 1979, in addition to appointments at All Souls College, Oxford and Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

Bruce-Mitford worked for the British Museum in the Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities from 1938, and, following the bequest of the Sutton Hoo Treasure to the nation, was charged with leading the project to study and publish the finds. This he did through four decades at the museum. He also became President of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Apart from military service in World War II he worked at the British Museum continuously until 1977, including two keeperships, and finally as a research keeper. Bruce-Mitford also held the titles secretary, and later vice-president, of the Society of Antiquaries, and president of the Society for Medieval Archaeology. He was also responsible for translating Danish archaeologist P. V. Glob's book The Bog People (1965) into English.

Early life[edit]

Rupert Leo Scott Bruce-Mitford was born on 14 June 1914 at 1 Deerhurst Road, Streatham, London.[1] Following Terence, Vidal, and Alaric (Alex), he was the fourth of four sons born to Eustace and Beatrice Jean Bruce-Mitford.[2] His mother was a daughter of John Fall Allison. Family tradition has it that Rupert's brothers were responsible for his given names, selecting them from their reading: Rupert from Anthony Hope's Rupert of Hentzau, Leo from Rider Haggard's She, and Scott from Robert Falcon Scott's diary, or his "Message to England".[3] The family's surname was little older. Eustace, born Charles Eustace Beer in 1875,[4] had adopted the name around 1902;[5] perhaps indicative of his desire to separate himself from his family's missionary past, the change occurred shortly before he left a teaching post at a school in China headed by his brother, and set out by himself for Japan.[6] "Mitford" was a take on "Midford," his mother's maiden name, and perhaps not unintentionally, that of the unrelated Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale, whose name carried respect in the British expatriate community in Japan.[7] "Bruce" may have been taken from Major Clarence Dalrymple Bruce, an acquaintance who commanded the Weihaiwei Regiment.[8] Eustace Bruce-Mitford was a journalist, geographer, and vulcanologist.[9] Rupert was born three years after his family returned from Japan, and three years before his father left for India.[10] When Eustace died in 1919, Rupert was five years old.[10]

Orphaned and poor, Rupert Bruce-Mitford was educated with the financial support of his mother's cousin.[11] She did so "on one condition – that [his] father's novel, depicting life in Yokohama at the turn of the Century, should be burnt; she thought it immoral and scurrilous."[12][13] Bruce-Mitford was thereby sent to Brightlands preparatory school in Dulwich, London, in 1920, and then to the charity school Christ's Hospital in 1925.[13] At Christ's Hospital he was introduced to archaeology, in 1930 participating in a dig with S. E. Winbolt at the Jacobean ironworks in Dedisham, Sussex.[14] By 1933 he had switched studies from classics to history, and was awarded a Baring Scholarship to attend Hertford College, Oxford.[14]

At the British Museum[edit]

Bruce-Mitford worked at the British Museum for 32 years, from 1938 to 1977, with a wartime break from 1940 to 1946 in the Royal Corps of Signals.[15] He was an assistant keeper for 11 years; keeper of the Department of British and Medieval Antiquities for 15 years, and of the Department of Medieval and Later Antiquities for 6; and for 2 years, from 1975 to 1977, a research keeper.[15]

In December 1937 Bruce-Mitford was named assistant keeper (second class)[16] of the then Department of British and Medieval Antiquities at the British Museum.[15] He was possibly helped in this position by his professor from two years previously, Robin Flower,[15] also the deputy keeper of Manuscripts.[17] That year Bruce-Mitford was reacquainted with archaeological work, spending three weeks with Gerhard Bersu at the Iron Age site Little Woodbury.[18] In 1939 he was tasked with leading an excavation, this time at the medieval village of Seacourt.[18] Though Seacourt was a difficult site, Bruce-Mitford was able to acquire complete ground plans of domestic buildings and of the church. It was also "a village deserted, in ruins, and archaeologically sealed within a century of the Black Death";[19] this precise dating—the village was deserted by 1439[19]—"promised to provide important evidence for specialists in connexion with the chronology of mediaeval pottery and small objects"[20] such as "brooches, ornaments, buckles, fittings of various kinds, shears, horseshoes, [and] nails" the dating of which was "notoriously vague".[21] Excavations wrapped up 15 July 1939,[20] seven weeks before Britain's entry into World War II.[22]

1940 to 1946 saw Bruce-Mitford serving in the Royal Signals, "reaching the standard Army morse speed of twelve words a minute and after his day-time job fire-watching in the dome of St. Paul's."[22] He was commissioned as an officer on 1 February 1941.[23] Bruce-Mitford spent the war awaiting his "eventual" return to the Department of British and Medieval Antiquities.[24] As early as 1940, he was informed by T. D. Kendrick that he would "be responsible for the Museum's collection of Anglo-Saxon antiquities and also for the Germanic collections of Europe and the Late Celtic collections of the British Isles."[25] The letter closed with a warning: "You will also be responsible for Sutton Hoo. Brace yourself for this task."[25]

His twenty-one years as Keeper saw outstanding acquisitions by the Museum, including the Lycurgus Cup and the Ilbert collection of clocks and watches; however, the Bury St Edmunds Cross was missed.[26]

Sutton Hoo[edit]

Colour photograph of the Sutton Hoo helmet
The Sutton Hoo helmet is one of the most iconic finds from the Sutton Hoo ship-burial

Excavated in 1939, the Anglo-Saxon Sutton Hoo ship-burial was to become "the defining moment of Rupert's life, his greatest challenge, the source of almost insuperable difficulties, and his greatest achievement."[24] By 1954 he was already recognised as the "spiritus rector of present day Sutton Hoo research",[27] a title that would only become more deserved with time.

Soon after returning to the British Museum Bruce-Mitford began publishing the Sutton Hoo finds, which had waited out the war in the London Underground before being returned to the museum in 1944 and 1945.[28] In 1944 Herbert Maryon, a Technical Attaché recruited for the task, set to work restoring them,[29] and when Bruce-Mitford returned two years later, he quickly began work.[30] As he later wrote, "[t]here followed great days for Sutton Hoo when new, often dramatic, discoveries were being made in the workshops all the time. Built from fragments, astonishing artefacts – helmet, shield, drinking horns, and so on – were recreated."[25] The first edition of The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: A Provisional Guide was published in January 1947,[31] the same year that Bruce-Mitford was elected a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.[32] The work quickly "turned out to be one of the Museum’s most successful publications ever";[33] by the time the second edition, The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: A Handbook, was published in 1968, the first had gone through ten impressions.

Dozens of articles, chapters, and books on Sutton Hoo would follow. In 1947 he visited Sweden for six weeks at the invitation of the archaeologist Sune Lindqvist, in what Bruce-Mitford would later describe as "one of the most rewarding experiences of my life."[34] There he studied the similar finds from Vendel and Valsgärde, learning Swedish along the way.[33] In 1960 Bruce-Mitford was put in charge of a definitive Sutton Hoo publication,[35] but before it was completed, from 1965 to 1970 he led another round of excavations at Sutton Hoo to acquire "more information about the mound, the ship and the circumstances of the burial".[36] The first volume of The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial was finally published in 1975,[37] and hailed as "one of the great books of the century" by A. J. Taylor, then president of the Society of Antiquaries.[38] The second volume followed in 1978,[39] and the third volume—published in two parts—came in 1983.[40][41]

Personal life[edit]

Bruce-Mitford was married three times, and had three children by his first wife. In 1941 he married Kathleen Dent, with whom he fathered Myrtle (b. 1943), Michael (b. 1946), and Miranda (b. 1951).[22] A professional cellist, Myrtle Bruce-Mitford would herself contribute to the Sutton Hoo finds, being employed by the British Museum to work on the remnants of the lyre and co-authoring a paper with her father.[42] She was also the longtime partner of Nigel Williams,[43] who from 1970 to 71 reconstructed the Sutton Hoo helmet.[44]

Bruce-Mitford's relationship with Dent was "long in trouble", and he left home in the later 1950s and formed a series of relationships.[45] He married his former research assistant Marilyn Roberta Luscombe on 11 July 1975; the marriage was dissolved in 1984,[45] at which point Bruce-Mitford found it necessary to sell his library, which went to Okinawa Christian Junior College in Japan.[46] In 1986 he married for a third time, to Margaret Edna Adams, a child psychiatrist and published poet, whom he had met at Oxford fifty years before.[46]

After years of inherited heart disease, Rupert Bruce-Mitford died of a heart attack on 10 March 1994.[46] He was buried eight days later in the burial ground by St Mary's Church in Bampton, Oxfordshire.[46] His widow, Margaret Edna Adams, died in 2002.[46]

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1947). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: A Provisional Guide. London: Trustees of the British Museum. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1974a). Aspects of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology: Sutton Hoo and Other Discoveries. London: Victor Gollancz. ISBN 0-575-01704-X. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1975). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial, Volume 1: Excavations, Background, the Ship, Dating and Inventory. London: British Museum Publications. ISBN 0-7141-1334-4. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1978). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial, Volume 2: Arms, Armour and Regalia. London: British Museum Publications. ISBN 9780714113319. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1979). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: Reflections after thirty years. University of York Medieval Monograph Series. 2. York: William Sessions. ISBN 0-900657-46-4. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1983a). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial, Volume 3: Late Roman and Byzantine silver, hanging-bowls, drinking vessels, cauldrons and other containers, textiles, the lyre, pottery bottle and other items. I. London: British Museum Publications. ISBN 0-7141-0529-5. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1983b). The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial, Volume 3: Late Roman and Byzantine silver, hanging-bowls, drinking vessels, cauldrons and other containers, textiles, the lyre, pottery bottle and other items. II. London: British Museum Publications. ISBN 0-7141-0530-9. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (2005). Taylor, Robin J., ed. A Corpus of Late Celtic Hanging-Bowls with An Account of the Bowls Found in Scandinavia. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-813410-7. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & Raven, Sheila (1997). Mawgan Porth: A settlement of the late Saxon period on the north Cornish coast: Excavations 1949–52, 1954 and 1974. London: English Heritage. ISBN 978-1-848-02186-0. 
  • Glob, P. V. (1969). The Bog People: Iron Age man preserved. Translated by Bruce-Mitford, Rupert. London: Faber and Faber. 

Articles[edit]

  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (July 1938). "A Hoard of Neolithic Axes from Peaslake, Surrey". The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. XIII (3): 279–284. doi:10.1017/S0003581500094737.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (June 1939). "Two Medieval Pottery Vessels". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XIII (2): 35–38. JSTOR 4422140.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1939). "The Archaeology of the Site of the Bodleian Extension in Broad Street, Oxford" (PDF). Oxoniensia. Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society. IV: 89–146. ISSN 0308-5562. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (July 1939). "Anglo-Saxon Brooch and Pot from Brixworth, Northants". The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. XIX (3): 325–326. doi:10.1017/S0003581500095081. 
  • Skinner, F. G. & Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (January 1940). "A Celtic Balance-beam of the Christian Period". The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. XX (1): 87–102. doi:10.1017/S0003581500045595. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (January 1940a). "Medieval tripod pitchers". The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. XX (1): 103–112. doi:10.1017/S0003581500045613. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1940b). "The Excavations at Seacourt, Berks, 1939: an interim report" (PDF). Oxoniensia. Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society. V: 31–41. ISSN 0308-5562. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (September 1946). "Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial". East Anglian Magazine. 6 (1): 2–9, 43. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & Jope, E. M. (1940). "Eleventh and Twelfth Century Pottery from the Oxford Region" (PDF). Oxoniensia. Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society. V: 42–49. ISSN 0308-5562. 
  • Myres, J. N. L.; Hawkes, C. F. C.; Bruce-Mitford, Rupert; Hill, J. W. F. & Radford, C. A. Ralegh (1946). "The Archaeology of Lincolnshire and Lincoln: Anglian and Anglo-Danish Lincolnshire" (PDF). The Archaeological Journal. Royal Archaeological Institute. CIII: 85–101. doi:10.1080/00665983.1946.10853806. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (May 1948). "Sutton Hoo and Sweden". The Archaeological News Letter. Linden Publicity. 1 (2): 5–7. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (October 1948). "Medieval Archaeology". The Archaeological News Letter. Linden Publicity. 1 (6): 1–4. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1948). "Saxon Rendlesham: Some preliminary considerations" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXIV (3): 228–251. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1949). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: Recent theories and some comments on general interpretations" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXV (1): 1–78. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1950). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial". Proceedings of the Royal Institution of Great Britain. XXXIV (3): 440–449. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (March 1950). "The Problem of the Sutton Hoo Cenotaph". The Archaeological News Letter. Linden Publicity. 2 (10): 166–169. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (4 March 1950). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial". Nature. Nature Publishing Group. CLXV (4192): 339–341. doi:10.1038/165339a0. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (April 1950). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: A New Chapter in Anglo-Swedish Relations". The Anglo-Swedish Review. Swedish Chamber of Commerce: 69–72. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (April 1951). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial". Scientific American. 184 (4): 24–30. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0451-24. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1951). "Anglo-Saxon Suffolk" (PDF). The Archaeological Journal. Royal Archaeological Institute. CVIII: 132–133. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "An Anglo-Saxon Gold Pendant from High Wycombe, Bucks". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 72. JSTOR 4422266. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "The Castle Eden Vase". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 73. JSTOR 4422267. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "A Late Saxon Disk-Brooch and Sword Pommel". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 74–75. JSTOR 4422268. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "Other Dark-Age Acquisitions". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 75–76. JSTOR 4422269. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "A Medieval Polychrome Pottery Aquamanile from Stonar, Kent". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 80–81. JSTOR 4422275. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & King, William (1952). "Medieval Pottery, Tiles, and Glass". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XV: 81–82. JSTOR 4422276. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (June 1952). "A Late-Saxon Silver Disk-Brooch from the Isle of Ely". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XVII (1): 15–16. JSTOR 4422367. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & Allan, John (June 1952). "Sutton Hoo—A Rejoinder: With a Note on the Coins". Antiquity. XXVI (102): 76–82. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00023619. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (December 1952). "The Fuller Brooch". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XVII (4): 75–76. JSTOR 4422395. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952). "The Snape Boat-Grave" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXVI (1): 1–26. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1952–1953). "A Bronze Strap-end of c. A. D. 900 from Souldern, Oxon" (PDF). Oxoniensia. Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society. XVII-XVIII: 236. ISSN 0308-5562. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (January 1954). "A Late- or Sub-Roman Buckle-Plate from College Wood, near Winchester". The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. XXXIV (1–2): 75–76. doi:10.1017/S0003581500073224.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  • Tonnochy, A. B.; Brailsford, J. W.; Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & King, William (June 1954). "British and Medieval Antiquities, 1753–1953". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XIX (1): 18–27. JSTOR 4422462. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (December 1954). "Review: The English Windmill". The Archaeological News Letter. Linden Publicity. 5 (7): 128. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (July 1957). "A Medieval Polychrome Jug from the City of London". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XXI (2): 54–55. JSTOR 4422573. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (December 1959). "The St Ninian's Isle Silver Hoard: Comments on the Bowls and Miscellaneous Silver, and General Conclusions". Antiquity. XXXIII (132): 257–268. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00027654. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1964). "Excavations at Sutton Hoo in 1938" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXX (1): 1–43. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (September 1964). "A Hiberno-Saxon Bronze Mounting from Markyate, Hertfordshire". Antiquity. XXXVIII (151): 219–220. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00105095. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (Summer 1965). "The Lindisfarne Gospels in the Middle Ages and Later". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XXIX (3–4): 98–100. JSTOR 4422900. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (4 November 1967). "Sutton Hoo Revisited". Archaeological Section No 2277. Illustrated London News (6692). London. pp. 26–27. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (March 1968). "Sutton Hoo Excavations, 1965–7". Antiquity. XLII (165): 36–39. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00033810. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (December 1968). "Fresh observations on the Torslunda Plates". Frühmittelalterliche Studien. Münster. 2: 233–236. doi:10.1515/9783110242027.233. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1969). "The Art of the Codex Amiatinus: Jarrow Lecture 1967". Journal of the British Archaeological Association. XXXII: 1–25. doi:10.1179/jba.1986.139.1.1.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert & Bruce-Mitford, Myrtle (March 1970). "The Sutton Hoo Lyre, Beowulf, and the Origins of the Frame Harp". Antiquity. XLIV (173): 7–13. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00040916. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (June 1970). "Ships' Figure-heads in the Migration Period and Early Middle Ages". Antiquity. XLIV (174): 146–148. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00104764. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (Spring 1971). "Envoi". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XXXV (1–4): 8–16. JSTOR 4423066. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (Autumn 1972). "The Sutton Hoo Helmet: A New Reconstruction". The British Museum Quarterly. British Museum. XXXVI (3–4): 120–130. JSTOR 4423116. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (February 1973). "Sutton Hoo drinking horns". The British Museum Society Bulletin (12): 20. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1974b). "Exhibits at Ballots: 5. A replica of the Sutton Hoo helmet made in the Tower Armouries, 1973". The Antiquaries Journal. LIV (2): 285–286. doi:10.1017/S0003581500042529. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (February 1974c). "The Sutton Hoo Helmet". The British Museum Society Bulletin (15): 6–7. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1977). "Obituary: Basil Brown" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXXIV (1): 71. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (January 1978). "The Archaeologist". National Magazine Company Ltd. London. 49 (1): 68–69. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1980). "Obituary: Leslie Dow, F.S.A" (PDF). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology. Ipswich. XXXIV (4): 287–288. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (December 1982). "The Sutton Hoo Helmet-Reconstruction and the Design of the Royal Harness and Sword-Belt: A Reply to Hofrat Dr. Ortwin Gamber with some additional comments on the Sutton Hoo Arms and Armour". The Journal of the Arms & Armour Society. London. X (6): 217–274. ISSN 0004-2439. 
  • Response to: Gamber, Ortwin (December 1982). "Some Notes on the Sutton Hoo Military Equipment". The Journal of the Arms & Armour Society. London. X (6): 208–216. ISSN 0004-2439. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1985). "Review: Vendel Period Studies: Transactions of the Boat-grave Symposium, Stockholm, 1981" (PDF). Medieval Archaeology. Society for Medieval Archaeology. 29: 231–233. doi:10.5284/1000320.  open access publication – free to read
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1989a). "Early Thoughts on Sutton Hoo" (PDF). Saxon (10). 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1989b). Anglo-Saxon and Mediaeval Archaeology, History and Art, with special reference to Sutton Hoo: The highly important Working Library and Archive of more than 6,000 titles formed by Dr. Rupert L.S. Bruce-Mitford FBA, D.Litt., FSA. Wickmere: Merrion Book Co. 
    • Includes prefatory essays My Japanese Background and Forty Years with Sutton Hoo by Bruce-Mitford.

Chapters[edit]

  • Bruce-Mitford, Bruce (1952). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial". In Hodgkin, Robert Howard. A History of the Anglo-Saxons. II (3rd ed.). London: Oxford University Press. pp. 696–734, 750–756. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1956). "Dark-Age Settlement at Mawgan Porth". In Bruce-Mitford, Rupert. Recent Archaeological Excavations in Britain: Selected Excavations 1939–1955 with a Chapter on Recent Air-Reconnaissance. New York: Macmillan. pp. 167–196. 
    • Briefly summarised in Griffiths, W. E. (May 1955). "The Second Viking Congress". The Archaeological News Letter. Linden Publicity. 5 (1): 17–19. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1956). "A Note on the Law and Practice of Treasure Trove". In Bruce-Mitford, Rupert. Recent Archaeological Excavations in Britain: Selected Excavations 1939–1955 with a Chapter on Recent Air-Reconnaissance. New York: Macmillan. pp. 297–301. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1970). "Preface". In Grohskopf, Bernice. The Treasure of Sutton Hoo. New York: Atheneum. pp. vii–x. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1986). "The Sutton Hoo Ship-Burial: Some Foreign Connections". Angli e Sassoni al di qua e al di là del mare: 26 aprile-lo maggio 1984. Settimane di studio del Centro italiano di studi sull'alto Medioevo. XXXII. Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'alto Medioevo. pp. 171–210. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (1987). "Ireland and the Hanging Bowls—A Review". In Ryan, Michael. Ireland and Insular Art, A.D. 500–1200: Proceedings of a Conference at University College Cork, 31 October-3 November 1985. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. pp. 30–39. ISBN 0-901714-54-2. 

Reviews[edit]

  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (29 May 1952). "Pre-Conquest England and Byzantium". Summer Books. The Listener. Vol. XLVII no. 1213. London: BBC. p. 879. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (14 May 1954). "Boats of the North". History. The Times Literary Supplement (2728). London. p. 314. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (22 February 1963). "The Age of the Cross". The Times Literary Supplement (3182). London. p. 143. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (28 May 1971). "Topographical Past". History. The Times Literary Supplement (3613). London. p. 612. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (4 January 1985). "The Age of the Cross". Art History. The Times Literary Supplement (4266). London. p. 21. 
  • Bruce-Mitford, Rupert (11 November 1988). "The Sign of the Cross". Archaeology. The Times Literary Supplement (4467). London. p. 1256. 

Other[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 59.
  2. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 59–61.
  3. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 59, 59 n.4.
  4. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 61.
  5. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 63.
  6. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 62–63.
  7. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 63–64.
  8. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 64.
  9. ^ Biddle, Martin. "Mitford, Rupert Leo Scott Bruce- (1914-1994), archaeologist and art historian". ODNB. Retrieved 23 September 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 67.
  11. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 67–68.
  12. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1989b, p. 10.
  13. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 68.
  14. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 69.
  15. ^ a b c d Biddle 2015, p. 73.
  16. ^ "No. 34472". The London Gazette. 11 January 1938. p. 198. 
  17. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 71.
  18. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 74.
  19. ^ a b Bruce-Mitford 1940b, p. 31.
  20. ^ a b Bruce-Mitford 1940b, p. 33.
  21. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1940b, p. 40.
  22. ^ a b c Biddle 2015, p. 75.
  23. ^ "No. 35082". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 February 1941. p. 1068. 
  24. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 76.
  25. ^ a b c Bruce-Mitford 1989b, p. 13.
  26. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1989b, p. 77-8.
  27. ^ Magoun, Jr. 1954, p. 117.
  28. ^ Biddle 2015, pp. 78, 80.
  29. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1975, p. 228.
  30. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 78.
  31. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1947.
  32. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 79.
  33. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 81.
  34. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1989a.
  35. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 82.
  36. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1975, p. 230.
  37. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1975.
  38. ^ Biddle 2015, p. 83.
  39. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1978.
  40. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1983a.
  41. ^ Bruce-Mitford 1983b.
  42. ^ Bruce-Mitford & Bruce-Mitford 1970.
  43. ^ Kennedy 1992, p. 33.
  44. ^ Williams 1992.
  45. ^ a b Biddle 2015, p. 84.
  46. ^ a b c d e Biddle 2015, p. 85.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]