This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Rupi Kaur

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Rupi Kaur
Rupi Kaur by Baljit Singh.jpg
Kaur in 2016
Born (1992-10-04) 4 October 1992 (age 29)
NationalityCanadian
EducationUniversity of Waterloo (BA)
OccupationAuthor, poet, artist, illustrator, performer
Websitewww.rupikaur.com

Rupi Kaur (born 4 October 1992) is a Canadian poet, illustrator, photographer, and author. Born in Punjab, India, Kaur emigrated to Canada at a young age with her family. She began performing poetry in 2009 and rose to fame on Instagram, eventually becoming a popular "Instapoet" through her three collections of poetry.

In March 2015, as a part of her university photography project, Kaur posted a series of photographs to Instagram depicting herself with menstrual blood stains on her clothing and bedsheets. Instagram removed the image, in response to which Kaur wrote a viral critique of the company's actions. As a result of the incident, Kaur's poetry gained more traction and her initially self-published debut collection, Milk and Honey (2014), was reprinted to widespread commercial success.

The success of Milk and Honey proved worrisome for Kaur as she struggled throughout the creation of the follow-up, The Sun and Her Flowers (2017). Feelings of burnout occurred after the release but soon subsided. A desire to feel less pressure for commercial success influenced her third collection, Home Body (2020) – a partial response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Considered to be a part of the "Instapoetry" group, Kaur's work is simplistic in nature and explores South Asian identity, immigration and femininity; her childhood and personal life serve as sources of inspiration. Line drawings accompany her poetry with stark subject matters.

Her popularity has been compared to that of a popstar and Kaur has been praised for influencing the modern literary scene, although Kaur's poetry has had mixed critical reception and been subject to frequent parody; she has been dogged by claims of plagiarism by fellow "Instapoets". Kaur has been included on congratulatory year-end lists by the BBC and Elle; The New Republic controversially called her the "Writer of the Decade".

Early life[edit]

Kaur was born into a Sikh family in Punjab, India, on 4 October 1992.[1][2][3] At age three, she emigrated to Canada with her parents to escape from persecution of Sikhs.[4] Her father had left before, due to hate crimes against Sikh men, and wasn't present for Kaur's birth.[5][6] Due to financial instability, he would send back supplies suitable for Kaur and her upbringing.[6] She lived with her parents and three younger siblings in a one-bedroom basement flat, where they slept in the same bed.[4] Her family eventually settled in Brampton, Ontario, alongside a large South Asian diaspora community, while Kaur's father worked as a truck driver.[1][5][7]

When her father lived in Japan he'd write Punjabi poetry to Kaur's mother, who practiced painting.[8] At the age of 5, Rupi Kaur began to take on her mother's hobby of painting.[9] However, she was imposed to do so as she was given a paintbrush and forced to draw.[9] Her mother wanted to instill this art in her since it was so close to home.[9] Also, Kaur recalled that poetry was a recurrent aspect of her faith, spirituality and everyday life: "There were evenings when my dad would sit around for hours, analyzing a single verse for hours".[10] As a child, Kaur would find herself embarrassed by her mother's accent and try to distance herself.[11] Kaur was generally self-conscious about her identity.[10] Her mother was occasionally distant to Kaur, as a result of her family and culture, particularly when Kaur was on her period; menstruating, alongside her childhood abuse, often left Kaur debilitated.[12] Her relationship with her parents, in particular her mother, become turbulent in her adolescence; there were extensive arguments over mundane activities that Kaur later interpreted as a result of wishing to preserve their original culture.[13][14] As a young child she witnessed relatives and friends experience domestic violence or sexual abuse; watching her parents be subject to racism, she inferred, resulted in her coy disposition.[15][16] Her environment growing up led to her developing what she deemed "constant survival mode".[17]

She performed kirtan and Indian classical music for several years.[8][18] Kaur aspired to be an astronaut or a social worker or a fashion designer; her ambitions changed frequently and her father prohibited her from studying the latter subject in university.[12][19] She expressed an interest in reading from a young age, finding it relieved her loneliness.[8] Her interest was hindered by Kaur having English as a second language, first learning it at age 10, although she considered her affinity for books as akin to a friendship.[4][20] She only began to amass confidence and social skills in fourth grade.[14]

An initial aversion to English meant Kaur was effectively mute for a period of time.[21] Throughout middle school she partook in "speech competitions", winning one in seventh grade, thus helping her find progress and hope in spite of isolation and bullying.[18][19] According to Kaur, she was an easy target for ridicule due to her outward appearance and vulnerability.[22] Kaur was subject to various comments about her appearance from her parents and peers.[23] She had begun to grow in confidence following sixth grade and it was writing and performing that led her to "[find] her voice".[7][24] She experienced the nadir of her education during high-school, as she sustained, what she considered, toxic care. Her feelings were relieved upon forgoing people who she described as "very dangerous for me".[25] Poetry brought her solace as she dealt with being self-conscious – of literature, she read, among others, Amrita Pritam, Maya Angelou, Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss and J. K. Rowling.[23]

She studied rhetoric and professional writing at the University of Waterloo; she'd teach creative-writing classes for high school and college students while in education herself.[1][2] When studying poetry she'd "agonize over each and every word": "I would have to pull out the list of literary devices my teacher gave me and my 10 colorful pens. It was like doing surgery on the damn thing."[11]

Career[edit]

Early work (2009–2013)[edit]

Kaur first began performing poetry in 2009.[26] Although she found spoken-word poetry "really natural", describing her first show as "Like a damn hug", she'd fidget with the paper above her face, leaving before audiences clapped due to her anxiety.[8][27] Her poetry at first received a lukewarm reception, having been told that she was too aggressive for certain venues or made some people uncomfortable.[4][28] "So many people around me early on thought it was absolutely ridiculous".[29] Kaur started writing in an attempt to articulate her personal trauma, having just left an abusive relationship – which influenced her decision to perform poetry: "I wanted to find a voice, because I had been voiceless for so long".[30][31][14] At university, her writing became more reflective than before, having previously written about boys she liked and the political changes she wanted to see in the world – although she was, by her own admission, ignorant on the matter, her poems at first lambasted the Canadian government.[14][32] Kaur would often be in conflict with her parents over her choice to pursue poetry.[33]

Throughout high school, Kaur shared her writing anonymously.[19] She took the stage surname of Kaur because "Kaur is the name of every Sikh woman – brought in to eradicate the caste system in India – and I thought, wouldn't it be empowering if a young Kaur saw her name in a book store?".[12][a] From 2013 onward, she began sharing her work without a pseudonym on Tumblr before moving to Instagram in 2014 where she started adding simple illustrations.[19] Around this time, she began to garner a cult following and, at times, had 600 attendees at her shows, her career, thus far, having been subject to "[almost] word of mouth".[35][36][37] Her first poem posted on Instagram regarded a wife coping with her husband's alcoholism; she described the experience as cathartic.[38]

Milk and Honey (2014–2016)[edit]

At first submitted her poetry to literary anthologies, magazines and journals, to little success.[28] Kaur's first book, Milk and Honey, was self-published on Createspace on 4 November 2014, after she begun work at age 18.[1][11][39] She created the poems in Milk and Honey "entirely for [herself], with zero concept of book in mind", and sold more than 10,000 copies.[40][41] Kaur recalled that she was hesitant to submit to magazines or journals because it "felt like I was taking apart [Milk and Honey] and throwing things at different walls, hoping they would stick. I feel like it only made sense when it was [collected] because this is a body of work".[36]

Kaur reading an excerpt from Milk and Honey

In March 2015, as a part of her university photography project, Kaur – intending to challenge prevalent societal menstrual taboos and the objectification of women – posted a series of photographs to Instagram depicting herself with menstrual blood stains on her clothing and bed sheets.[30][42][43] Internet trolls harassed Kaur over the photos, which were twice removed for not complying with the site's terms of service; Kaur claimed that she was not notified beforehand or given a reason and criticised their censorship as misogynistic and reaffirming what she sought to condemn – deeming the act an "attack on my humanity".[42][44] Instagram apologized and brought back the images, citing a mistaken removal.[44]

Her response went viral, credited with bringing Kaur more followers and leading to the subsequent rise in popularity of her poetry.[11] She later regretted writing her response, finding widespread disdain affected her mental health, experiencing anxiety that "sort of set in and never really left" and suicidal thoughts for a period of time.[45][46] That same year, she wrote 10 chapters of a yet unpublished novel.[11]

As Kaur rose to prominence on social media, Milk and Honey was re-released by Andrews McMeel Publishing, which saw her work alongside an editor for the first time.[1] It became a "blockbuster" success and, as of 2017, has sold 2.5 million copies worldwide and translated into 25 languages – the same year, it was the best-selling book in Canada.[47][48] During a poetry reading in 2015, Kaur, upon seeing a line of her fans that extended four street blocks, fully realised the extent of her audience and grew more confident in her poetry as a result.[28] She performed a TED Talk the next year.[49] Kirsty Melville, publisher and president of AMP, credits the book's success with Kaur's connection to her readers.[50]

At age 22, she employed seven people to aid her, as a part of a company she founded.[51] While writing, her team often manages her social media.[52] She would later describe the success of Milk and Honey as surreal, noting a deeply sentimental and inspiring attachment.[20]

The Sun and Her Flowers (2017–2019)[edit]

they convinced me
i only had a few good years left
before i was replaced by a girl younger than me
as though men yield power with age
but women grow into irrelevance
they can keep their lies
for i have just gotten started
i feel as though i just left the womb
my twenties are the warm-up
for what i'm really about to do
wait till you see me in my thirties
now that will be a proper introduction
to the nasty, wild, woman in me,
how can i leave before the party's started
rehearsals begin at forty
i ripen with age
i do not come with an expiration date
and now
for the main event
curtains up at fifty
let's begin the show

Timeless

Following a three-month writing trip in California, and in the same year as her induction into the Brampton Arts Walk of Fame, Kaur's second book, The Sun and Her Flowers, was published, on 3 October 2017.[4][53][54] She views it as a "one long continuous poem that goes on for 250 pages", "which while birthed in Instagram, is a concept that depends on being bound".[40] As of 2020, the book has sold upwards of a million copies and has been translated into multiple languages.[45] In 2018, she made nearly $1.4 million from poetry sales.[55] That same year, she performed at the Jaipur Literary Festival: "It was as if I had waited my whole life for this moment. It was my only show, where I wasn't nervous. The crowd was energetic."[56]

While touring the world, she experienced feelings of depression and anxiety.[57] The process of creating The Sun and Her Flowers and trying to replicate her success affected her mental health, reporting "furious 12-hour [writing] stretches" and 72-hour migraines.[57][58] She experienced months of writer's block and frustration at her work, ultimately calling its creation the "greatest challenge of my life".[59][60] Following its release, she dealt with feelings of burnout – writing the poem "Timeless" in response.[51] These feelings began to subside as she viewed them as transient – aided by Elizabeth Gilbert's Big Magic, which she said "saved my life".[51] By early 2019, she entered therapy to ease her depression and anxiety.[45]

That year, she was commissioned by Penguin Classics to write an introduction for a new edition of Kahlil Gibran's The Prophet, in anticipation of that book entering the public domain in the United States and performed at the London Book Fair.[61][62] Kaur considers Gibran an influence and has dubbed The Prophet her "life bible".[63][64]

Home Body (2020–present)[edit]

Kaur released her new poetry collection, entitled Home Body, on 17 November 2020.[65] The collection featured illustrations from Kaur and became one of the best-selling books of 2020.[65][66] Intent with feeling less pressure for commercial profit, Kaur reached out to fellow authors for guidance – having felt imposter syndrome during its creation due to Milk and Honey's success.[45][57] She begun work in 2018, during a time of depression and concluded the process amidst a period of introspection, a by-product of the COVID-19 pandemic, as is Home Body, in Kaur's eyes.[20][46]

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Kaur moved back in to her parents' house in Brampton and began teaching workshops on Instagram Live, due to feelings of loneliness and fear and a desire to connect with her audience.[67] To her students, she emphasizes a natural and therapeutic approach to writing.[67]

She self-released a poetry special, Rupi Kaur Live, consisting of poetry readings and anecdotes accompanied by visuals and music, in April 2021, after it was turned down by streaming services – Kaur acknowledged that it was an atypical prospect.[68][69][70] By August that year it had been released on Amazon Prime in a limited capacity.[71] Explaining the impetus, Kaur recalled her separation of performance and prose, attempting to hide the former, and how her eventual marriage of the two styles "in maybe 2016" allowed the show to occur.[68] In 2021, she performed as a part of a tribute to Jack Layton.[72]

Artistry and influences[edit]

Since Gurmukhi script has no concept of separate lower and upper case, her work is written exclusively in lowercase,[73] using only the period as a form of punctuation; Kaur writes this way to honour the Punjabi language.[74] She said that she enjoys the equality of letters and that the style reflects her worldview.[19] The experience of learning English upon moving to Canada and studying poetry has influenced her writing style, subsequently tailoring her work to be accessible, particularly by readers learning English.[11][39] Kaur has emphasized her poetry's relation to South Asian culture – to the point that she's weary of Western readers fully understanding it.[5]

Her poems often conclude with either a final italicized line that either identify its audience or articulate its theme or her name.[1] In her article for The Globe and Mail, Tajja Isen described this as Kaur's "trademark move" and likened it to the use of a hashtag.[54] Kaur's style ranges from aphoristic, inspirational and confessional, although her poems aren't "100 percent autobiographical" – the fictional elements being often opaque in regards to their authenticity.[7][39][75] Kaur's childhood: her fickle temperament, her Sikh identity and her dad's activism – which included Kaur partaking in protests as a child – affected her poems.[10][23]

The Rose Theatre, where Kaur regularly performs her poetry[7]

The writing process begins with her starting on paper and then transferring the "most promising" material to an extended Microsoft Word document.[51] Oftentimes after this process culminates, she attaches a compelling image along with her poems to complement the verses.[76] Lastly, it concludes after she has narrowed the poem to its main elements and she has received affirmation from her sister.[38] Her printed poems are often excerpts from longer spoken-word work, publishing "the part that really made my stomach turn".[23] Due to treating writing as a "form of healing", she doesn't consider the audience, solely valuing her response and engagement.[33] Across all her projects, she maintains "full creative control", contributing towards aspects such as the cover and minutiae of her books.[68] Kaur has said that she approaches her poetry like running a business and writes "to perform it", seeing the stage as where her ambitions are fully achieved.[77][78] Within the context of performance, her use of line breaks and periods represent where she would pause and where a new idea would be introduced, respectively.[63]

Her written poetry focus upon design, whereas her performances centre on rhyme, narrative and delivery.[52] She performs in a sing-song manner, at times alongside audience members, Kaur making use of original music scores and ornate projections.[63][79] Carol Muske-Dukes highlighted that, in being a "performative poet", Kaur continues a tradition of "the page enact[ing] [the performance] in the mind".[40] Elisa New spotlighted Kaur's proximity and similarities with spoken-word and hip-hop artists.[5]

An example of Kaur's imagery which uses the central conceit of self-harm

Sparse line drawings accompany her poems.[11][80] They have been compared to outsider art; her drawings and poetry have seen allusions to childhood artistry.[81][82][83] The National Poetry Library noted that the art in Milk and Honey, functions like a graphic novel.[84] The style of drawing continues in The Sun and Her Flowers.[85] Her illustrations, juxtaposed with the poems, are "striking" and "often disturbing", with one, for example, linking self-harm with despair.[80][86] Images that appear in her work include twisting bodies, crawling flowers, and fingers forming the shapes of hearts. Kaur explained that her style is intended to be recognisable and evoke a brand, akin to Apple's.[80] She creates them following their respective poem being written.[46] Since its inception, Kaur's public image has been denoted as authentic and individual; spiritual and boldly feminist.[87]

Alongside her peers – Nayyirah Waheed, Lang Leav, Warsan Shire – and other "Instapoets", Kaur's plainspoken and free verse poetry is delivered in a "bite-size" manner – some poems only composing of one line.[47][88] With The Sun and Her Flowers, her poems expanded their length.[63] "[W]ith its epigrammatic brevity, plain language, and empowering messages", Kaur's poetry has been said to be emblematic of the common "Instapoet" style.[89] Kaur, who dislikes the term "Instapoet", has also been said to belong to a "new generation of migrant writers, a generation who 'sits-in, tweets, posts and broadcasts'".[90][91] She has been said to be possibly the "representative of an entire generation's values and ethos".[12] She differs from her peers in her focus upon self-care and depiction of pain as intertwined with triumph.[14] Kaur has said that she writes for "the generation that's reading my work...I am writing something that is believable to that generation".[80]

Tina Daheley and The New York Times' Gregory Cowles recognized a candid and lyrical nature in Kaur's poetry with Cowles saying that her "artless vulnerability [is] like a cross between Charles Bukowski and Cat Power".[92][93] Due to her usage of dry, open-ended, and colloquial language, Kaur has been said to break from and reject traditional standards and features of poetry which are held in importance.[40][94][95] Matthew Zapruder, Becky Robertson of Quill & Quire and Kaur identified a universal quality in her work.[40][96][97] Literature scholar Alyson Miller wrote that Kaur makes use of "gendered yet ostensibly universal themes relating to sexism, trauma, friendship, and violence".[98]

Following Milk and Honey, she became more selective in regards to publishing her poetry online, having extensively showcased her work online unless embarrassed by the content.[18] "Over the years, I've distanced myself from it...When the numbers started to grow, I started to overthink things. I felt more pressure to be correct and perfect all the time".[99] Focusing upon "design, marketing, creative writing and branding", Kaur's Instagram account, with 3.5 million followers, fluctuates between photographs of Kaur and her poetry, with South Asian people and iconography as a prominent focus.[75][100] Using The Sun and Her Flowers as a base, her poetry special had an "ethereal nature-driven aesthetic", featuring large yellow flower petals around the stage and projected.[77][101] She refined her aesthetic into a more stylised manner following the release of Beyoncé (2013).[102] Kaur has described Beyoncé as an influence, as well as Sharon Olds, Marina Abromovich, Adele, Kahlil Gibran, Nizzar Qabbani, Amrita Sher-Gil and Frida Kahlo.[10] Furthermore, Kaur takes inspiration from herself, her friends and her mother.[30]

Themes and motifs[edit]

our work should equip
the next generation of women
to outdo us in every field
this is the legacy we'll leave.

Progess, an example of Kaur's feminist writing.[88]

Kaur' poetry explores a small selection of themes alongside issues faced by Indian women and immigrants, female trauma and the "South Asian experience".[11][47][103] Her mother is a subject she treats with reverence in her work and pays tribute to her parents in her poem Broken English – Kaur credits her mother, due to significant sacrifices made in Kaur's childhood, with her career as a poet.[104][101] Eleanor Ty wrote that Kaur, by means of her poetry, "reveals a sophisticated understanding of the psychological complexities of family dynamics".[75] Although examined differently, her written and performed poetry share the same themes.[52]

Domestic and sexual violence were a particular focus of her initial work and rape related trauma became more explicit after Milk and Honey.[18][105] She explored violence and trauma heavily in her early work because "I had this desire to unpack so many deeper emotions and issues that I'd seen affecting me and so many women around me".[35] Her poem, I'm Taking My Body Back, concerns her surviving a sexual assault.[106] Kaur has admitted that writing about these heavy subjects can be both cathartic and troublesome to her mental wellbeing.[107] She writes in the second person in her most solemn depictions of domestic abuse, "as if [she] is attempting to distance herself from her experience of physical abuse".[75]

Common cultural metaphors and motifs such as honey, fruit and water arise in her work.[83] A sense of mystic transcendentalism can be found, often intertwined with discourse on 'natural' beauty.[98] Milk and Honey has themes of abuse, love, loss and healing.[88] Love serves as her general primary theme.[3] Feminism, refugees, immigration and her South Asian identity became more prominent in The Sun and Her Flowers, alongside musings on body dysmorphia, abuse, rape and self-love.[11][58][103] Kaur said of the books that they're are "inward" and "outward" journeys, respectively; The Sun and Her Flowers has more breadth of themes.[85][108] Influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic, Home Body examines themes of capitalism, productivity and mental health, more than before.[57]

Reception and impact[edit]

fall in love with your solitude

Kaur's most popular poem, from Milk And Honey.[100][b]

The most popular of the "Instapoets", and dubbed the "Oprah of her generation," Chiara Giovanni of Buzzfeed News noted that Kaur's celebrity – which has led her peer Kazim Ali to call her perhaps the most famous poet of all time – is "more akin to that of a pop star like [Ariana] Grande than a traditional poet", crediting her accessibility.[88][109][110] Agatha French, writing for the Los Angeles Times, compared reactions to the announcement of The Sun and Her Flowers, by Kaur's majority young and female fans, to "the fervent devotion of Beatles fans" – she's been credited with "spearhead[ing] the merging of poetry and pop culture".[81][40][70] Her live performances routinely have hundreds of attendees, with turnout, at times, as high as 800 people.[7][41]

According to Kaur, her success has "democratised poetry and literature in general" – Kaur also credits Instagram with the perceived democratisation of poetry, feeling that her working class and racial background wouldn't allow her to be published otherwise.[57][111] Regarded as a "pioneer" of the "Instapoet" style, Erica Wagner noted Kaur's influence in what she called the "biggest overall shift [in reading habits] we've seen in the past decade".[84][112] Kaur has instigated greater focus on poetry by booksellers, American adults and young people.[53][108][113] In 2017, a rise of poetry sales in Canada and in the United Kingdom prompted attribution to Kaur.[114][115]

Fans have praised her for writing about her personal trauma and elevating diversity in a "overwhelmingly" white literary scene.[11][88] Her poetry has been credited with "inspir[ing] [a] hub of creativity for young black girls"; author Tanya Byrne argued that fellow BAME writers should replicate Kaur's self-publishment.[116][117] Her style of menstrual activism has become "more the norm than the exception", with many women of color generating similar media attention since Kaur.[118] She has inspired various young poets to begin the practice.[113] "Kaur has become...a voice for the marginalized", wrote Sadaf Ahsan, for National Post; literature scholar Lili Pâquet saw such a signifier as resulting from the fallout of her menstrual photographs.[83][87]

Online reception[edit]

Her series of menstrual photographs elicited a "very" mixed reception.[119] She received death threats levied towards her, which led to emotional numbness and a subsequent distancing from social media.[120] In retrospect, Amika George, a British activist who campaigns against period poverty in the United Kingdom, credits Kaur's menstrual photographs with being the "catalyst for opening up the conversation about periods".[12] Allison Jackson of The World, Jane Helpern of i-D and, literary scholar Anna Camilleri espoused similar notions in 2015.[121][122][123] Various feminist artists defended Kaur when her menstrual photographs were taken down.[124] Kaur noted an effect on her friends in Punjab, as they had frank discussions with their families regarding periods.[12] In response to the reception of her photos, Kaur initially said:

I know that 50-60% of all comments on every site that covered the story were negative, but that didn't affect me much. What upset me was that people I knew first-hand were reacting badly. These were guys from my own community, who I'd been to high school with, and they were trying to tarnish me rather than the art...People always say my work is so great for women, that it is feminist art. But for me, it's men that need to see it the most. Because it's the misogyny that we need to address, rather than the feminism.[30]

Kaur later admitted that for many years internet trolls had "left me broken", having previously dismissed such ideas.[51] To resolve her dismay, she came to the conclusion that "I'm here to speak my truth and connect with readers, and that's it. None of the negative voices matter in the end".[51] Her work have been the subject of memes online, usually in the form of parody poems mocking Kaur's writing style, their prominence having been compared to a cottage industry.[125][126] Ahsan described Kaur as a "social media commodity", a status from which she prospers.[83] In 2017, a book parodying Kaur's poetry, entitled Milk and Vine, was released.[127] Kaur considers disdain for the fame her work has garnered to be analogous to the reception of contemporary art, seeing both as disparaged for being "easy".[23]

Waheed and Shire, among Kaur's influences, have accused her of plagiarism.[90] Claims by Waheed's supporters are based on Kaur and her lack of punctuation and use of honey as a metaphor.[128] Kaur has denied claims of plagiarism, speculating about the likelihood of similar experiences and that their similar themes and use of honey is a "by-product of our times", comparing contemporary concurrent artistic development to that in the Renaissance or Victorian periods – Kaur attributing their namesakes as said development.[106][125]

Critical reception[edit]

Critics have been less laudatory than general audiences. She has become "something of a polarizing figure in the literary, publishing, and media communities", whose "work is often knocked as being lowbrow or trite, or not in the rich tradition of serious poetry".[53][129] Her use of contemporary vernacular has drawn ire.[130] Other criticisms include her work being formulaic, attenuated and juvenile.[80][131][132] Kaur feels that her work can't be "fully reviewed or critiqued through a white lens or a Western one".[106] According to Ali, "no criticism has been leveled at Kaur that hasn't been similarly leveled at "actual" poets", citing Mary Oliver, Jane Hirshfield, Sharon Olds and Lucille Clifton.[109]

Rebecca Watts lambasted her poems' popularity and accessibility, describing them as "artless" and characterised by "the open denigration of intellectual engagement and rejection of craft" – Priya Khaira-Hanks, writing for The Guardian, remarked that Kaur's accessibility often led to "over-simplicity".[81][133][134] Watts' criticism was supported and disparaged by poets alike.[134] Isen disparaged what she regarded as an overly explanatory style, particularly when performed, as "the belated imposition of rhythm" fails to conceal compositional shortcomings.[54] Carl Wilson and Khaira-Hanks argued that her mainstream success and personal identity contributed towards people disregarding her work.[81][39] Kaur's poetry and her status as a poet has been dismissed and seen to be of inauthentic quality; this perception has been rebuked.[47][135]

Watts considered Kaur to be more concerned with authenticity than the "traditional craft of poetry".[136] In an essay for The Baffler, Soraya Roberts chastised Kaur as disingenuously representative of female South Asian oppression, when she is purportedly chiefly concerned with commodification; Pâquet echoed similar sentiments.[87][137] The lack of distinction between personal and collective trauma has received further criticism.[88] Miller viewed Kaur's work as vague and clichéd, citing an example depicting oppression: kaur, a woman of sikhi.[98]

In 2017, BBC and Vogue listed Kaur in their lists of women of the year; Quill & Quire chose The Sun and Her Flowers for their annual list of the best books.[3][108][138] The next year she was included on Forbes and Elle's complimentary lists of emerging artists.[110][139] In 2019, The New Republic named Kaur "Writer of the Decade", due to her impact on the medium of poetry; this led to a debate on whether the award was deserved, as well as about her work in general.[82][90][113]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

Articles[edit]

Performance films[edit]

  • Rupi Kaur Live (2021)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Kaur has described the name Singh as "the overarching last name" for her family.[34]
  2. ^ Kaur's most popular poems are "usually the unambiguous affirmations".[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Fischer, Molly (3 October 2017). "The Instagram Poet Outselling Homer Ten to One". The Cut. Archived from the original on 5 June 2018. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  2. ^ a b Aguiar, Deborah Vieira Pinto; Magaldi, Carolina Alves (30 January 2020). "Rupi Kaur: Women's Writing Tradition in Translation". International Journal of Linguistics, Literature and Translation. 3 (1). doi:10.32996/ijllt.2020.3.1.6 (inactive 28 February 2022). SSRN 3528322. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of February 2022 (link)
  3. ^ a b c Pike, Naomi (29 December 2017). "The Girls Who Ruled 2017". British Vogue. Retrieved 8 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ a b c d e Fishwick, Samuel (5 May 2017). "Rupi Kaur: 'I've never been more aware of my colour'". Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 29 March 2021. Retrieved 12 June 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d Rao, Sonia (11 October 2017). "Few read poetry, but millions read Rupi Kaur - The Boston Globe". Boston Globe. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 6:00-7:00.
  7. ^ a b c d e Choe, Jaywon; Flock, Elizabeth (2 January 2018). "How poet Rupi Kaur became a hero to millions of young women". PBS. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ a b c d Gopal, Vivek (1 May 2018). "Pop-Poet Rupi Kaur Isn't Worrying About Being Unique". Vice. Archived from the original on 17 March 2021. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  9. ^ a b c "National Poetry Month: Rupi Kaur - English | Colorado State University". English. Retrieved 25 February 2022.
  10. ^ a b c d Bozinoski, Mónica (10 October 2019). "Rupi Kaur: "When we connect, we feel less alone"". Vogue. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Carlin, Shannon (21 December 2017). "Meet Rupi Kaur, Queen of the 'Instapoets'". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 1 May 2020. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Burgum, Becky; George, Amika (28 May 2019). "Rupi Kaur And Amika George: Two Teen Icons Taking On The World". Elle. Retrieved 18 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ Tina Daheley (2 June 2018). "Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative". The Cultural Frontline (Podcast). BBC. Event occurs at 2:30-2:38. Retrieved 21 July 2021.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Groen, Danielle (11 November 2016). "How Rupi Kaur Became the Voice of Her Generation". Flare. Retrieved 26 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Vaz, Wynat (14 June 2017). "The Female Gaze: Rupi Kaur on The Freedom of Expression". Verve. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  16. ^ Kartung, Kaylee (21 April 2021). "Video Poet Rupi Kaur brings poetry to new heights with special, 'Rupi Kaur Live'". ABC News. Retrieved 31 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ Tom Power (2 December 2020). "Rupi Kaur on Home Body, depression and the viral photo that changed her life". Q (Podcast). CBC Radio. Event occurs at 9:10 - 9:20. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  18. ^ a b c d Biedenharn, Isabella (13 October 2017). "Instagram sensation Rupi Kaur doesn't have social media on her phone". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 13 November 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  19. ^ a b c d e Jain, Atishsa (22 October 2016). "A poet and rebel: How Insta-sensation Rupi Kaur forced her way to global fame". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 21 April 2017. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  20. ^ a b c Patrick, Ryan B. (4 November 2021). "'Leave your heart on the line and take the risk': Rupi Kaur on poetry, success & hosting the Giller Prize". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 24 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  21. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 9:30-9:35.
  22. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 12:20-12:30.
  23. ^ a b c d e Bakshi, Asmita (2 October 2017). "Popstar of poetry: "Insta-poet" Rupi Kaur is at the forefront of a movement embodying short, raw verse, with arbitrary line-breaks and quick, often gut-punch-packing compositions". India Today. ProQuest 1951480290.
  24. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 9:40-10:00.
  25. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 13:00-13:40.
  26. ^ Marsh, Ariana (5 January 2018). "Rupi Kaur and Sloane Stephens's Success Stories Are Total Career Inspiration". Teen Vogue. Retrieved 20 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ Shadrach Kabango (19 April 2016). "'Micropoet' Rupi Kaur nourishes readers with Milk and Honey". Q (Podcast). CBC Radio. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  28. ^ a b c Kassam, Ashifa (26 August 2016). "Rupi Kaur: 'There was no market for poetry about trauma, abuse and healing'". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  29. ^ Irving, John; VanderMeer, Jeff (7 September 2017). "Why Rupi Kaur loves Harry Potter". CBC Books. Retrieved 2 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  30. ^ a b c d Briscoll, Drogan (23 July 2015). "Feminist Artist Rupi Kaur, Whose Period Photograph Was Removed From Instagram: 'Men Need To See My Work Most'". HuffPost. Archived from the original on 1 April 2016. Retrieved 22 March 2016.
  31. ^ Tom Power (30 April 2021). "'Aren't we all just fighting to be resilient?': Rupi Kaur on womanhood, poetry and her new live show". Q (Podcast). CBC Radio. Event occurs at 1:18-1:28. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  32. ^ Kahanna, Priyanka (5 February 2019). "Incredible Indian Women Across the Globe". Vogue India. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  33. ^ a b El-Safty, Amirah (6 October 2015). "Internet Made the Poetry Star". The Walrus. Retrieved 31 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  34. ^ Tom Power (2 December 2020). "Rupi Kaur on Home Body, depression and the viral photo that changed her life". Q (Podcast). CBC Radio. Event occurs at 15:40 - 15:50. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  35. ^ a b Szkutak, Rebecca (10 October 2017). "How Rupi Kaur used Instagram to transform poetry". Interview. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  36. ^ a b Arora, Kim (27 January 2018). "There is resistance to Insta-poetry only because it is new: Rupi Kaur - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  37. ^ Asmelash, Leah (18 October 2021). "Poetry is experiencing a new golden age, with young writers of color taking the lead". CNN. Retrieved 30 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  38. ^ a b Vaz, Wyanet (3 August 2017). "Instagram Poets Who Took Our Hearts By Storm: Rupi Kaur". Verve. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  39. ^ a b c d Wilson, Carl (15 December 2017). "Why Rupi Kaur and Her Peers Are the Most Popular Poets in the World". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 7 March 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  40. ^ a b c d e f French, Agatha (12 October 2017). "Instapoet Rupi Kaur may be controversial, but fans and book sales are on her side". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  41. ^ a b Kirch, Claire (6 December 2016). "PW Notables of the Year: Rupi Kaur". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 5 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  42. ^ a b Faust, Gretchen (2017). Digital Environments: Ethnographic Perspectives Across Global Online and Offline Spaces. Transcript Verlag. pp. 159–170. ISBN 9783837634976. JSTOR j.ctv1xxrxw.14. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  43. ^ Das, Nabina (2015). "Blood, Period: In many countries, especially in India, menstruation is a subject of taboo and stigma, which feeds the ego and pride of a misogynist society that objectifies and sexualises women". Economic and Political Weekly. 50 (16): 95–96. JSTOR 24482075. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  44. ^ a b Gaybor, Jacqueline (11 November 2020). "Everyday (online) body politics of menstruation". Feminist Media Studies: 1–16. doi:10.1080/14680777.2020.1847157. ISSN 1468-0777. S2CID 228869373. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  45. ^ a b c d Power, Tom (2 December 2020). "Rupi Kaur on Home Body, depression and the viral photo that changed her life". CBC Radio. Archived from the original on 2 June 2021. Retrieved 12 June 2021.
  46. ^ a b c Mathers, Joanna (21 December 2020). "Rupi Kaur: Meet Poetry's Defiant Darling". Viva. Retrieved 23 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  47. ^ a b c d Mezezwa, Tariro (5 October 2017). "Rupi Kaur Is Kicking Down the Doors of Publishing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 13 June 2018. Retrieved 24 May 2018.
  48. ^ "Here are the bestselling books in Canada of 2017". CBC Books. Archived from the original on 3 August 2020. Retrieved 2 October 2020.
  49. ^ Writer, The Indian Express (4 October 2019). "Rupi Kaur weaves a powerful narrative on human trauma and healing". The Indian Express. Retrieved 20 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  50. ^ Gross, Anisse (26 August 2016). "How To Sell Nearly a Half-Million Copies of a Poetry Book". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 5 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  51. ^ a b c d e f Maitland, Hayley (14 March 2019). "Instagram Sensation Rupi Kaur Gets Candid About Trolls, Acne, And How To Make It As A Writer". British Vogue. Retrieved 17 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  52. ^ a b c Keswani, Sumeet (5 June 2016). "Men must read feminist poetry to know what we go through: Rupi Kaur". The Times of India. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  53. ^ a b c Maher, John (2 February 2018). "Can Instagram Make Poems Sell Again?". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 5 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  54. ^ a b c Isen, Tajja (27 April 2018). "Poet Rupi Kaur comes full circle with Brampton performance". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  55. ^ Ferguson, Donna (26 January 2019). "'Keats is dead...': How young women are changing the rules of poetry". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  56. ^ Bali, Etti (17 February 2018). "What Rupi Kaur heard while growing up: 'Can't you just fit in? Eww, you are so Indian!'". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 25 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  57. ^ a b c d e Joshi, Sonam (13 December 2020). "Everyone said the literary world would laugh at me but I didn't care: Rupi Kaur - Times of India". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 18 February 2021. Retrieved 12 June 2021.
  58. ^ a b Medley, Mark (6 October 2017). "Rupi Kaur: The superpoet of Instagram". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  59. ^ Rogers, Shelagh (9 October 2017). "How Rupi Kaur pushed through writer's block to create her second collection of poems". CBC Radio. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  60. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 22:30-22:40.
  61. ^ Alter, Alexandra (29 December 2018). "New Life for Old Classics, as Their Copyrights Run Out". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 9 October 2020. Retrieved 6 January 2019.
  62. ^ Albanese, Andrew (15 March 2019). "London Book Fair 2019: Heard Any Good Poems Lately?". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 5 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  63. ^ a b c d Shaikh, Sadaf (23 April 2018). "The Time Of Rupi Kaur In The Era Of A Vexed Generation". Verve. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  64. ^ Writer, CBC (10 October 2017). "Rupi Kaur and Shelagh Rogers share some of their favourite books of poetry". CBC Books. Retrieved 2 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  65. ^ a b "Rupi Kaur to publish new poetry collection, home body, in Nov. 2020". CBC Books. 14 September 2020. Archived from the original on 21 September 2020. Retrieved 2 October 2020.
  66. ^ Isaac, Paulina Jayne (11 December 2020). "Here Are the Best-Selling Books of 2020". Cosmopolitan. Retrieved 2 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  67. ^ a b "When COVID-19 hit, bestselling poet Rupi Kaur had writer's block — so she started teaching on Instagram". CBC Radio. Archived from the original on 18 July 2020. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  68. ^ a b c "Rupi Kaur Self-Releases Poetry Special After Being Turned Down By Streaming Services: 'A Journey'". People. Archived from the original on 9 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  69. ^ "Bestselling poet Rupi Kaur releasing on-demand poetry performance film on April 30". CBC Books. 13 April 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  70. ^ a b Bozorg, Shadi (2 September 2021). "Rupi Kaur, Instagram's Favourite Poet, Shares Her Truth". Complex. Retrieved 30 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  71. ^ Zorrilla, Mónica Marie (18 August 2021). "Poet Rupi Kaur Gets One-Hour Special on Amazon Prime Video". Variety. Retrieved 30 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  72. ^ Staff, The Canadian Press (18 July 2021). "Star-studded event to mark 10th anniversary of Jack Layton's death". CTV News. Retrieved 31 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  73. ^ VanderBeek, Conner Singh (2 April 2020). "To be a child of diaspora: The irreconcilable outsider in Sikh discourse". Sikh Formations. 16 (1–2): 187–199. doi:10.1080/17448727.2018.1545192. ISSN 1744-8727. S2CID 149490129. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  74. ^ O'Donnell, Norah (26 February 2018). "Rupi Kaur on the simplicity of her poetry and the rise of "Instapoets"". CBS News. Retrieved 20 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  75. ^ a b c d Ty, Eleanor (2018). "Teaching Literatures in the Age of Digital Media". Canadian Review of Comparative Literature. 45 (2): 213–221. doi:10.1353/crc.2018.0020. ISSN 1913-9659. S2CID 150162170.
  76. ^ "5 Reasons Rupi Kaur Is the Poet of Our Times". B&N Reads. 9 January 2018. Retrieved 25 February 2022.
  77. ^ a b Harumi, Luana (30 April 2021). "Rupi Kaur Wants To Give You Hope". V. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  78. ^ Hill, Faith; Yuan, Karen (15 October 2018). "How Instagram Saved Poetry". The Atlantic. Retrieved 6 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  79. ^ Bozorg, Shadi (2 December 2021). "Rupi Kaur Promises to Take Audiences on a 'Deeper Journey' on Her World Tour". Complex. Retrieved 23 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  80. ^ a b c d e Writer, The Economist (1 November 2017). "Rupi Kaur reinvents poetry for the social-media generation". The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved 22 July 2021.
  81. ^ a b c d Khaira-Hanks, Priya (4 October 2017). "Rupi Kaur: the inevitable backlash against Instagram's favourite poet". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 9 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  82. ^ a b Alam, Rumaan (23 December 2019). "Rupi Kaur Is the Writer of the Decade". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  83. ^ a b c d Ahsan, Sadaf (14 October 2017). "Free Verse; how Brampton's Rupi Kaur Defies Her Critics Sadaf Ahsan". National Post. ProQuest 1950794453.
  84. ^ a b Writer, National Poetry Library (4 May 2020). "New to Eloans: Tracy K. Smith and Rupi Kaur". National Poetry Library. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  85. ^ a b Cerón, Ella (4 October 2017). "Rupi Kaur Talks "The Sun and Her Flowers" and How She Handles Social Media's Response to Her Work". Teen Vogue. Retrieved 20 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  86. ^ Dean, Michelle (26 February 2016). "Instagram poets society: selfie age breeds life into verse and has a new following". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  87. ^ a b c Pâquet, Lili (2019). "Selfie‐Help: The Multimodal Appeal of Instagram Poetry". The Journal of Popular Culture. 52 (2): 296–314. doi:10.1111/jpcu.12780. ISSN 0022-3840. S2CID 167066039.
  88. ^ a b c d e f Giovanni, Chiara (4 August 2017). "The Problem With Rupi Kaur's Poetry". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 8 January 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2021.
  89. ^ Millner, Maggie (13 June 2018). "Instapoets Prove Powerful in Print". Poets & Writers. Retrieved 25 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  90. ^ a b c Ahsan, Sadaf (2 January 2020). "Rupi Kaur may not be MY 'writer of the decade,' but that doesn't mean she isn't THE 'writer of the decade'". National Post. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  91. ^ Harris, Ashleigh (3 July 2018). "Introduction: African Street Literatures and the Global Publishing Go-Slow". English Studies in Africa. 61 (2): 1–8. doi:10.1080/00138398.2018.1540173. ISSN 0013-8398. S2CID 165665676.
  92. ^ Cowles, Gregory (17 June 2016). "Inside the List". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 20 June 2021.
  93. ^ Tina Daheley (2 June 2018). "Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative". The Cultural Frontline (Podcast). BBC. Event occurs at 1:36-1:38. Retrieved 21 July 2021.
  94. ^ Castillo, Rafael (16 January 2020). "2020 will be the year of the independent author". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  95. ^ Euse, Erica (7 November 2017). "the cult of rupi kaur". i-D. Retrieved 20 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  96. ^ Robertson, Becky (15 December 2016). "Q&Q staff share their holiday-gift picks". Quill & Quire. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  97. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 21:10-21:13.
  98. ^ a b c Miller, Alyson (2019). "'Poetry's Beyoncé': On Rupi Kaur and the commodifying effects of instapoetics". Axon: Creative Explorations. 9 (1). Retrieved 27 December 2021.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  99. ^ Popa, Maya C. (29 March 2019). "What Happens When Verse Goes Viral?". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  100. ^ a b Leszkiewicz, Anna (6 March 2019). "Why are we so worried about "Instapoetry"?". New Statesman. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  101. ^ a b Dundas, Deborah (28 April 2021). "With an essential worker father and Brampton beset by COVID-19, poet Rupi Kaur celebrates the immigrant working class". Toronto Star. Retrieved 22 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  102. ^ Writer, Times of India (8 February 2018). "Beyonce changed my life: Rupi Kaur - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  103. ^ a b Imran, Muhammad (2018). "The Sun and Her Flowers: Rupi Kaur. Kansas: Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2017, 248 pages" (PDF). Asian Women. 34 (4): 121–124. doi:10.14431/aw.2018.12.34.4.121. S2CID 149459094. Archived (PDF) from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  104. ^ Tina Daheley (2 June 2018). "Rupi Kaur: Rewriting the Migration Narrative". The Cultural Frontline (Podcast). BBC. Event occurs at 2:40-2:50. Retrieved 21 July 2021.
  105. ^ Noel-Tod, Jeremy (15 October 2017). "Book review: The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur". The Times. ISSN 0140-0460. Retrieved 2 July 2021.
  106. ^ a b c Majumdar, Anushree (4 February 2018). "Rupi Kaur: The attractive, marketable social media icon critics love to rage at and young Instagrammers flock to". The Indian Express. Retrieved 6 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  107. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 25:00-26:00.
  108. ^ a b c Robertson, Becky (11 December 2017). "2017 Books of the Year: reviewers' picks | the sun and her flowers". Quill and Quire. Retrieved 18 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  109. ^ a b Ali, Kazim (23 October 2017). "On Instafame & Reading Rupi Kaur by Kazim Ali". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 20 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  110. ^ a b Pitt, Helen (1 November 2019). "Thought poetry was dead? The 'Instapoets' raking it in online would beg to differ". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  111. ^ Rogers, Sam (20 March 2019). "The Rise Of The Insta-Poet: 6 Modern Bards You Should Be Following". British Vogue. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  112. ^ Wagner, Erica (10 December 2019). "How reading has changed in the 2010s". BBC Culture. Retrieved 19 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  113. ^ a b c Weaver, Jackson (1 January 2020). "Instapoet Rupi Kaur's 'writer of the decade' honour rekindles debate on her work, genre". CBC Books. Retrieved 15 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  114. ^ Walker, Rob (7 October 2017). "'Now it's the coolest thing': rise of Rupi Kaur helps boost poetry sales". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  115. ^ Wong, Jessica (16 December 2018). "Viral verse: Poets of Instagram inject new life, fresh voices into poetry genre". CBC News. Archived from the original on 13 December 2020. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  116. ^ Devaney, Susan (27 November 2020). "Rupi Kaur's Poetry Inspired This Hub Of Creativity For Young Black Girls". British Vogue. Retrieved 3 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  117. ^ Byrne, Tanya (18 August 2017). "'BAME writers must tell their own stories – and we have to be disruptive'". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  118. ^ Copeman, Jacob; Banerjee, Dwaipayan (2019). Hematologies: The Political Life of Blood in India. Cornell Scholarship Online. p. 116. ISBN 9781501745096.
  119. ^ Saul, Heather (31 March 2015). "Menstruation-themed photo series artist 'censored by Instagram' says images are to demystify taboos around periods". The Independent. Archived from the original on 10 June 2021. Retrieved 10 June 2021.
  120. ^ Hutcheon, Jane (25 May 2017). One Plus One: Rupi Kaur (Video). One Plus One. ABC News. Event occurs at 19:00-19:20.
  121. ^ Jackson, Allison (2015). "These female artists are challenging the world's perception of women's bodies". The World. Public Radio International. Retrieved 20 July 2021.
  122. ^ Helpern, Jane (1 July 2015). "10 signs that menstruation is modernizing". i-D. Retrieved 20 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  123. ^ Camilleri, Anna (2015). "Sacrilegious Heroics: Biblical and Byronic Archetypes of the Vengeful Feminine". The Byron Journal. 43 (2): 109–120. doi:10.3828/bj.2015.16. ISSN 1757-0263. S2CID 162964769.
  124. ^ Poland, Bailey (2016). Haters: Harassment, Abuse, and Violence Online. University of Nebraska Press. p. 220. ISBN 978-1-61234-872-8.
  125. ^ a b "Why Do We Love To Hate and Meme Insta-Poet Rupi Kaur?". Vice. Archived from the original on 9 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  126. ^ Crawford, Blair (17 November 2017). "Rupi Kaur, the 'Poet of Instagram' wows sellout crowd at Museum of History". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 23 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  127. ^ Kini, Aditi Natasha (15 November 2017). "White Mediocrity Has Propelled This Rupi Kaur Parody Book to the Top of the Best-Seller List". Teen Vogue. Retrieved 20 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  128. ^ "'Instapoet' Rupi Kaur weaves Punjab into her poems". Hindustan Times. 2 October 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  129. ^ Leeder, Karen (3 July 2018). "'I am a Double-voiced […] Bird': Identity and Voice in Ulrike Almut Sandig's Poetry". Oxford German Studies. 47 (3): 329–350. doi:10.1080/00787191.2018.1503471. ISSN 0078-7191. S2CID 166185107. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021. Retrieved 9 June 2021.
  130. ^ Bresge, Adina (8 June 2018). "Verse goes viral". The Hamilton Spectator. ISSN 1189-9417. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  131. ^ Mann, Jagdeesh (9 June 2017). "Rupi Kaur's literary ascent is poetry in motion". The Georgia Straight. Retrieved 20 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  132. ^ "Preface: Poetry's Revival and Mr. Wilson". Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture. 23 (3): 5–22. 2020. doi:10.1353/log.2020.0024. ISSN 1533-791X. S2CID 242732517.
  133. ^ Carpani, Jessica (3 April 2021). "No rhyme or reason to publishers, says Britain's most followed poet on Instagram". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 3 July 2021.
  134. ^ a b Flood, Alison; Cain, Sian (23 January 2018). "Poetry world split over polemic attacking 'amateur' work by 'young female poets'". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  135. ^ Paterson, Don (26 January 2018). "Curses and verses: the spoken-word row splitting the poetry world apart". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  136. ^ Manning, Maria (2021). "Crafting Authenticity: Reality, Storytelling, and Female Self-Representation through Instapoetry". Storytelling, Self, Society. 16 (2). ISSN 1550-5340.
  137. ^ Roberts, Soraya (24 January 2018). "No Filter". The Baffler. Retrieved 27 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  138. ^ BBC Staff (1 November 2017). "BBC 100 Women 2017: Who is on the list?". BBC. Archived from the original on 31 March 2019. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  139. ^ Casparis, Lena de (4 June 2018). "Introducing The Elle List 2018: 50 Movers And Shakers Of The Moment". Elle. Retrieved 6 June 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]