Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA

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Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA
Rush2box.jpg
North American Nintendo 64 cover art
Developer(s)Atari Games (as GT Interactive Software Corp.)
Publisher(s)Midway Games
Designer(s)Ed Logg
Composer(s)Barry Leitch
SeriesRush
Platform(s)Nintendo 64
Release
  • NA: November 10, 1998
  • PAL: February 4, 1999
Genre(s)Racing
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA is a racing video game developed by Atari Games and published by Midway Games exclusively for the Nintendo 64 video game console. It was released on November 10, 1998 in North America, and February 4, 1999 in Europe. Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA is a sequel to San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing and the second game in the Rush series.

Gameplay[edit]

The game is notable for the high level of detail in the recreations of the various cities and states used, and for its fast arcade-style physics. The game also features a two-player mode and rumble pack support. Hidden shortcuts and jumps add to the replay value of the game.

Mountain Dew soda cans appear in the game and can be collected to unlock content.[1][2]

Reception[edit]

IGN gave Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA a "great" 8.9 out of 10 overall despite criticism with the presentation, calling it "a bit on the cheesy side" and stating that it had "generic menus and the same overall front-end" as San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing.[2] The game received generally positive critical responses, and has a ranking of 77.69% on GameRankings.[3]

Next Generation rated it four stars out of five, and stated that "Trust us, you'll be hooked. And that's to say nothing of the game's two-player mode. Overall, Rush 2 is a worthy successor to the original."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rush 2 Does the Dew". IGN. September 24, 1998. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Casamassina, Matt (November 11, 1998). "Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA". IGN. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  3. ^ Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA
  4. ^ "Finals". Next Generation. No. 49. Imagine Media. January 1999. p. 109.