Russia national rugby union team

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Russia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Медведи (The Bears)
EmblemRussian bear
UnionRugby Union of Russia
Head coachLyn Jones
CaptainAndrey Garbuzov
Most capsYuri Kushnarev (114)
Top scorerYuri Kushnarev (777)
Top try scorerVyacheslav Grachev (31)
Home stadiumSochi Central Stadium
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current25 (as of 16 February 2020)
Highest16 (2012)
Lowest26 (2005)
First international
Russia 27–23 Barbarian F.C.
(Moscow, Russia; 6 June 1992)
Biggest win
Denmark 7–104 Russia
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 13 May 2000)
Biggest defeat
Japan 75–3 Russia
(Tokyo, Japan; 6 November 2010)
World Cup
Appearances2 (First in 2011)
Best resultPool stage, 2011, 2019
Websitewww.rugby.ru

The Russia national rugby union team (Russian: Сборная России по регби, Sbornaya Rossii po regbi), nicknamed the Bears, is administered by the Rugby Union of Russia (RUR). The RUR is considered the official successor union of the Soviet Union by World Rugby and the combined CIS team which played in the early 1990s. Since 1992, the team has played as Russia. Its first test match as Russia was against the Barbarians in Moscow in June 1992 and the country's first test against an official Test nation was against Belgium later that same year.

Russia is seen as a Tier 2 union by World Rugby.[1] The team's regular international competition is in the Rugby Europe Championship – often referred to as the Six Nations B. In addition, the team participates in World Rugby-run summer tournaments including the Nations Cup, the dormant Churchill Cup, and other international fixtures.

Russia competed in their first Rugby World Cup (RWC) in New Zealand in 2011 after qualifying as Europe 2 through their second-place finish in the 2009–10 ENC. Russia played in Pool C and finished fifth, scoring one point. Previous qualification campaigns saw elimination to Portugal ahead of the 2007 tournament and expulsion from 2003 qualifying for breaches of eligibility rules. The team also unsuccessfully attempted to qualify for the 1995 and 1999 Rugby World Cups. They competed in the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan by qualifying as Europe 1 as a result of Spain, Romania and Belgium being eliminated.

History[edit]

Georgia v. Russia, 24 March 2007

The Rugby Union of the Soviet Union was founded in 1936, although the national side did not play its first official international until 1974.

The Soviet Union took time to establish itself, but by the mid-1980s was regularly beating the likes of Italy and Romania. The team was invited to the inaugural 1987 Rugby World Cup, but declined on political grounds, not least the continued IRB membership of apartheid South Africa.[2]

Following the breakup of the USSR, Russian players played for the interim Commonwealth of Independent States team, which played four matches during 1991 and 1992.

The first game played by the new Russian national team took place on June 6, 1992, when Russia beat the Barbarians 27–23. Russia's first game against a full IRB member was versus Belgium four months later in the 1992/4 FIRA-AER European Trophy. That edition of the tournament saw Russia secure its first, and to-date only, win over Georgia. Russia continued to participate until realignment of FIRA-AER competitions in 2000.

The Russian national side has since played its regular competitive rugby in FIRA-AER's European Nations Cup, the second level mirror tournament to the Six Nations. Russia replaced Morocco in the top tier in 2001 after a team-record nine-game win streak and have stayed there ever since. The Russian side has yet to win the title, but has come close with second-place finishes twice, in the 2009 and the 2007-8 editions. It also secured second place in the 2009–10 combined table used in Rugby World Cup qualification.

In addition, as part of attempts to secure regular international fixtures the team has played in the now-defunct Superpowers Cup, winning the tournament once, the Nations Cup, the Churchill Cup, and most recently the IRB's International Rugby Series. The Russian side has also played representative teams including England Counties, France's equivalent side, South African Super Rugby youth and university sides, and New Zealand club teams as it seeks to vary and improve the quality of opposition.

The RUR has been attempting to gain greater participation in the autumn test window, and is now being integrated into World Rugby's global test match schedule.[1]

Rugby World Cup[edit]

World Cup record[edit]

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round P W D L F A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Declined invitation -
United KingdomIrelandFrance 1991 Did not enter Did not enter
South Africa 1995 Did not qualify 4 3 0 1 125 49
Wales 1999 4 1 0 3 85 92
Australia 2003 Banned 6 5 0 1 176 114
France 2007 Did not qualify 14 6 1 7 382 323
New Zealand 2011 Pool Stage 4 0 0 4 57 196 10 7 1 2 291 175
England 2015 Did not qualify 12 7 0 5 269 300
Japan 2019 Pool Stage 4 0 0 4 19 160 10 4 0 6 249 201
Total 2/9 8 0 0 8 76 356 50 29 2 19 1328 1053

Early qualifying attempts (1987 – 2007)[edit]

The Soviet Union declined to take up its invite to take part in the inaugural 1987 Rugby World Cup on the basis of the IRB membership by apartheid South Africa.[3] The Soviet Rugby Union was not an IRB member in time for 1991 Rugby World Cup qualifying.

In qualifying for the 1995 Rugby World Cup, the first in which the national side was involved, Russia came through preliminary qualifying with wins over Poland and Georgia, before beating Germany but losing to Romania for the Eastern Europe spot.

In European qualifying for the 1999 Rugby World Cup, Russia finished fourth in Pool 1 in Round B, which was not enough to progress from a group also including Italy, Georgia, Croatia, and Denmark.

The Russian national side was expelled from qualifying for the 2003 Rugby World Cup, due to eligibility issues. Spain, who Russia had beaten in qualifying, protested the fielding of three South African-born players (Johan Hendriks, Reiner Volschenck and Werner Pieterse), whom the RUR claimed had qualified through ancestry. However, the RUR did not produce documentation deemed acceptable by the IRB, and Spain were re-instated in qualification in Russia's place.[4]

In 2007 Rugby World Cup qualifying, Russia came through European qualifying to a mini-group stage where they were pooled with Italy and Portugal. The winner would qualify directly and the second place team would continue the qualification process, with the third-placed team eliminated. After both losing heavily to Italy, Portugal and Russia met to determine progression to qualifying round 5. Russia lost the match, played in Lisbon, 26–23 and dropped out.

2011[edit]

Russia qualified for the 2011 Rugby World Cup in New Zealand as Europe 2 after finishing second in the 2008–10 European Nations Cup. This marked the team's World Cup debut, with Russia becoming the 25th side to play at the tournament, where they faced Australia, Ireland, Italy and the United States in Group C of the tournament.[5]

Despite losing all four of their games, most disappointingly a narrow defeat to the US in its opening fixture in which the Bears scored a bonus point, Russia's debut was generally viewed as a success,[citation needed] as the team scored the most tries (8) by a debutant in the professional era,[citation needed] and the most since Western Samoa in 1991, and becoming the first side to score three tries against Australia in a World Cup match since 1987.[citation needed]

Match Results
Date Opponent Score Venue
15 Sep 2011  United States 6–13 Stadium Taranaki, New Plymouth
20 Sep 2011  Italy 17–53 Trafalgar Park, Nelson
25 Sep 2011  Ireland 12–62 International Stadium, Rotorua
1 Oct 2011  Australia 22–68 Trafalgar Park, Nelson

2015[edit]

The Russian national rugby union team finished third in European qualifying for the 2015 Rugby World Cup. The top two teams in the final group— Georgia and Romania — immediately qualified for the 2015 tournament. Russia, as third-place finisher in the final group, faced Uruguay in a home-and-away two-game playoff. Uruguay won on aggregate and secured the 20th and final qualifying spot for the 2015 tournament, with Russia failing to qualify.

2019[edit]

The Russian national rugby union team once again finished third in European qualifying for the 2019 Rugby World Cup. However, after a controversial game played by Belgium and Spain (which was originally intended to be replayed), the issue of three teams in the group stage fielding ineligible players (Belgium, Romania, and Spain) was investigated by World Rugby and Rugby Europe. It was determined that all three teams had violated eligibility rules and gained an unfair advantage (both Romania and Spain defeated Russia by slim margins) and were sanctioned, and thus, Russia advanced as the automatic qualifier, with Germany headed to the repechage against Portugal.

European Nations Cup[edit]

As the Soviet Union, the side secured four straight silvers (all behind France and ahead of Italy and Romania) during the 1980s, and a further three bronzes.

Russia first played the FIRA Trophy in the 1992–94 season. Since 2000, Russia's primary international competition is the European Nations Cup, administered by Rugby Europe and played, by-and-large, during the Six Nations international release window in February and March. Russia won the inaugural Division 2 competition, winning promotion to the top tier in 2000, where they have remained ever since.

Since realignment, Russia has secured two runners-up spots and three third-place finishes, in doing so claiming the third-highest number of wins, the third-highest win percentage, and the third-lowest number of losses, in each case placing below Georgia and Romania.

In the 2011-12 season, Russia finished fourth with five wins and five losses. In the 2013-14 season, the team finished third with six wins and four losses. In the 2015-16 season, the Bears again claimed six wins and four losses to finish third. In the 2017 season, Russia finished fourth with two wins and three losses.

Current players[edit]

Russia has traditionally fielded squads consisting near-entirely of players from its own professional league, but as players gain exposure, several players have represented their country while playing club rugby overseas, including Vasily Artemyev, the first Russian to play in the Aviva Premiership and locks Andrei Ostrikov, and Kirill Kulemin.

Former Melbourne Rebels lock Adam Byrnes, who qualified for Russia through maternal lineage, is the only foreign-born player to have played for the Bears in recent years.

Current squad[edit]

Russia`s squad for the 2020 Rugby Europe Championship.

Head Coach: Wales Lyn Jones

  • Caps Updated: 15 February 2020

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.

Player Position Date of birth (age) Caps Club/province
Shamil Magomedov Hooker (1987-04-17) 17 April 1987 (age 32) 2 Russia Enisey-STM
Denis Mashkin Hooker (1997-02-19) 19 February 1997 (age 22) 0 Russia Enisey-STM
Evgeny Matveev Hooker (1985-04-15) 15 April 1985 (age 34) 63 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Azamat Bitiev Prop (1989-12-09) 9 December 1989 (age 30) 24 Russia Krasny Yar
Kirill Gotovtsev Prop (1987-07-17) 17 July 1987 (age 32) 7 Russia Krasny Yar
Valery Morozov Prop (1995-09-21) 21 September 1995 (age 24) 22 England Sale Sharks
Vladimir Podrezov Prop (1994-01-27) 27 January 1994 (age 26) 29 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Alexey Scobyola Prop (1991-08-08) 8 August 1991 (age 28) 0 Russia Slava Moskva
Evgeny Elgin Lock (1987-03-10) 10 March 1987 (age 32) 28 Russia Enisey-STM
Andrey Garbuzov Lock (1983-08-07) 7 August 1983 (age 36) 99 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Roman Khodin Lock (1994-09-06) 6 September 1994 (age 25) 5 Russia Strela Kazan
Evgeny Mishechkin Lock (1997-07-27) 27 July 1997 (age 22) 13 Russia Slava Moskva
Andrei Ostrikov Lock (1987-02-07) 7 February 1987 (age 33) 37 France FC Grenoble
Yegor Zykov Lock (1993-01-11) 11 January 1993 (age 27) 2 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Victor Gresev Back row (1986-03-31) 31 March 1986 (age 33) 101 Russia Locomotiv Penza
Patris Peki Back row (1995-10-19) 19 October 1995 (age 24) 3 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Anton Sychev Back row (1994-02-05) 5 February 1994 (age 26) 20 Russia Metallurg
Vitaly Zhivatov Back row (1992-02-16) 16 February 1992 (age 28) 14 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Stepan Khokhlov Scrum-half (1998-05-09) 9 May 1998 (age 21) 1 Russia Slava Moskva
Konstantin Uzunov Scrum-half (1994-04-19) 19 April 1994 (age 25) 14 Russia Enisey-STM
Nikita Churashov Fly-half (1996-02-11) 11 February 1996 (age 24) 1 Russia Enisey-STM
Ramil Gaisin Fly-half (1991-07-26) 26 July 1991 (age 28) 50 Russia Enisey-STM
Dmitry Gerasimov Centre (1988-04-16) 16 April 1988 (age 31) 69 Russia Enisey-STM
Kirill Golosnitsky Centre (1994-05-30) 30 May 1994 (age 25) 14 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Stanislav Bondarev Centre (1988-09-29) 29 September 1988 (age 31) 0 Russia RK Bogatyri
Daniil Potikhanov Wing (1999-11-30) 30 November 1999 (age 20) 1 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
German Davydov Wing (1994-03-10) 10 March 1994 (age 25) 22 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Vladislav Sozonov Wing (1993-10-09) 9 October 1993 (age 26) 13 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye
Vasily Artemyev (c) Fullback (1987-07-24) 24 July 1987 (age 32) 92 Russia CSKA Moscow
German Godlyuk Fullback (1992-08-11) 11 August 1992 (age 27) 2 Russia VVA-Podmoskovye

Coaching staff[edit]

The current head coach is ex-Neath RFC flanker Lyn Jones.

Former head coach is Alexander Pervukhin, who returned to the position following a long break retains strong links to 2016 Russian Rugby Premier League Champions Enisei-STM in Krasnoyarsk.

Prior to Pervukhin, former Wales flanker Kingsley Jones was the most recent coach, with Siua Taumalolo and Darren Morris his assistants. He left in 2014 to take up a coaching role with the Newport Gwent Dragons in Wales. Raphaël Saint-André, brother of French coach Philippe Saint-André, then coached the team for the final two matches of the 2015 Rugby World Cup qualifying matches against Uruguay.

Coaching staff
Name With Backs Forwards Strength & Conditioning Coach Dates
Russia Alexander Pervukhin 2006–2008
France Claude Saurel 2008
Russia Nikolay Nerush England Steve Diamond England Jos Baxendell England Steve Diamond 2008–2010
Russia Nikolay Nerush Wales Kingsley Jones New Zealand Henry Paul Wales Darren Morris 2010–2011
Wales Kingsley Jones Tonga Siua Taumalolo Wales Darren Morris 2011–2014
France Raphaël Saint-André France Laurent Seigne 2014
Russia Alexander Pervukhin Russia Alexander Alekseenko Ireland Mark McDermott 2014–2018
Ireland Mark McDermott Russia Alexander Alekseenko Ireland Mark McDermott 2018
Wales Lyn Jones Russia Alexander Voytov Wales Shaun Connor Ireland Mark McDermott Wales Mark Bennett 2018-

Stadiums and attendance[edit]

The national team does not have a permanent home stadium and play their matches at various locations across Russia. These include the rugby hotbed of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia, where the national side played its first full test against a foundation union, versus Ireland in 2002. Other games have been played in Krasnodar, Sochi, Moscow, Monino and Penza.

After 2018 FIFA World Cup was held in Russia, the country received new large stadiums as a heritage. The Russian rugby union was given the opportunity to use these stadiums for the home games of the national team. The first big match took place in Moscow at VTB Arena as part of the warm-up to 2019 Rugby World Cup. In February 2020, Russia will host Portugal to the Kaliningrad Stadium.

The highest attended matches in Russia involving the Russian national team are:

Rank Attendance Opponent Date Venue Location
1 15,000  Italy 1998-04-18 Central Stadium Krasnoyarsk
2 15,000  Ireland 2002-09-21 Central Stadium Krasnoyarsk
3 12,000  Namibia 2018-11-10 Kuban Stadium Krasnodar
4 11,500  Spain 2018-02-10 Kuban Stadium Krasnodar
5 10,000  United States 2003-06-19 Central Stadium Krasnoyarsk
6 8,000  Georgia 2008-04-12 Central Stadium Krasnoyarsk
7 8,000  Zimbabwe 2014-08-04 Central Stadium Krasnoyarsk
8 6,500 Ireland Connacht 2019-09-07 VTB Arena Moscow
9 6,000  Belgium 2018-02-17 Kuban Stadium Krasnodar
10 5,850  Georgia 2019-03-17 Kuban Stadium Krasnodar
11 5,100 Barbarian F.C. 1992-06-06 RZD Arena Moscow

Recent and upcoming fixtures[edit]

The following table shows the fixtures of the Russian national team in official test matches during the previous 12 months.

Date Opponent Opp Rank Result Venue Event
2017-11-18  Chile 24 W 42-11 Hong Kong Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong 2017 Cup of Nations
2017-11-14  Kenya 30 W 31-10 Hong Kong King's Park, Hong Kong 2017 Cup of Nations
2017-11-10  Hong Kong 22 W 16-13 Hong Kong King's Park, Hong Kong 2017 Cup of Nations
2017-06-18  Namibia 19 W 31-10 Uruguay Estadio Charrúa, Montevideo 2017 World Rugby Nations Cup
2017-06-14  Uruguay 21 L 29-32 Uruguay Estadio Charrúa, Montevideo 2017 World Rugby Nations Cup
2017-06-10  Argentina XV n/a W 39-38 Uruguay Estadio Charrúa, Montevideo 2017 World Rugby Nations Cup
2017-03-19  Germany 24 W 52-25 Russia Sochi Central Stadium, Sochi 2017 Rugby Europe Championship
2017-03-12  Georgia 12 L 14-28 Georgia (country) Dinamo Arena, Tbilisi 2017 Rugby Europe Championship
2017-03-04  Romania 16 L 10-30 Russia Sochi Central Stadium, Sochi 2017 Rugby Europe Championship
2017-02-18  Belgium 26 W 25-18 Belgium King Baudouin Stadium, Brussels 2017 Rugby Europe Championship
2017-02-11  Spain 22 L 6-16 Spain Estadio Nacional Complutense, Madrid 2017 Rugby Europe Championship

World Rugby Rankings[edit]

Top 30 rankings as of 10 February 2020[6]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  South Africa 094.19
2 Steady  New Zealand 092.11
3 Steady  England 087.80
4 Increase  Ireland 085.36
5 Decrease  Wales 084.28
6 Steady  France 082.37
7 Steady  Australia 081.90
8 Steady  Japan 079.28
9 Steady  Scotland 078.58
10 Steady  Argentina 078.31
11 Steady  Fiji 076.21
12 Increase  Georgia 072.70
13 Decrease  Italy 072.04
14 Steady  Tonga 071.44
15 Steady  Samoa 070.72
16 Steady  Spain 068.28
17 Steady  United States 068.10
18 Steady  Uruguay 067.41
19 Steady  Romania 065.11
20 Increase  Portugal 062.40
21 Steady  Hong Kong 061.23
22 Increase  Canada 061.12
23 Increase  Namibia 061.01
24 Increase  Netherlands 060.08
25 Decrease  Russia 059.90
26 Steady  Brazil 058.89
27 Steady  Belgium 057.57
28 Steady  Germany 054.64
29 Steady  Chile 053.83
30 Steady  South Korea 053.11
*Change from the previous week
Russia's historical rankings
Russia IRB World Rankings.png
Source: World Rugby - Graph updated to 10 February 2020[6]

On introduction of the World Rugby Rankings in October 2003, Russia was ranked 23rd. Since then the team's lowest ranking was 26 (most recently in October 2005). The team's ranking peaked at 16 on several occasions (most recently in February 2010). As of November 15, 2016, Russia is ranked 21st in the world.

Overall record[edit]

Below is table of the representative rugby matches played by a Russia national XV at test level up until 08 February 2020.[7]

Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Argentina Jaguars 5 0 5 0 0.00% 58 200 –142
 Argentina XV 2 2 0 0 100.00% 87 78 +9
 Australia 1 0 1 0 0.00% 22 68 –46
 Belgium 8 7 1 0 87.50% 275 148 +127
 Canada 5 1 4 0 20.00% 91 157 –66
 Chile 1 1 0 0 100.00% 42 11 +31
 Croatia 1 0 1 0 0.00% 16 23 –7
 Czech Republic 8 6 2 0 75.00% 309 104 +205
 Denmark 3 3 0 0 100.00% 191 28 +163
 England Saxons 1 0 1 0 0.00% 17 49 –32
 France XV 2 0 2 0 0.00% 21 87 –66
France French Military 1 0 1 0 0.00% 12 33 –21
 Georgia 23 1 21 1 4.35% 260 579 –319
 Germany 11 11 0 0 100.00% 528 140 +388
 Hong Kong 5 5 0 0 100.00% 144 62 +82
 Ireland 3 0 3 0 0.00% 15 132 –117
Ireland Emerging Ireland 1 0 1 0 0.00% 0 66 –66
 Italy 5 0 5 0 0.00% 76 283 –207
 Emerging Italy 2 0 2 0 0.00% 36 60 –24
 Italy A 4 0 4 0 0.00% 66 129 –63
 Japan 7 1 6 0 16.7% 118 299 –161
 Kenya 1 1 0 0 100.00% 31 10 +21
 Morocco 3 2 1 0 66.67% 44 46 –2
 Namibia 7 5 2 0 71.43% 183 141 +42
 Netherlands 4 4 0 0 100.00% 208 39 +169
 Norway 1 1 0 0 100.00% 66 0 +66
 Papua New Guinea 1 1 0 0 100.00% 49 19 +30
 Poland 4 4 0 0 100.00% 201 59 +142
 Portugal 19 13 5 1 68.42% 518 362 +156
 Romania 23 6 16 1 28.26% 329 567 –238
 Samoa 1 0 1 0 0.00% 9 34 –25
 Scotland 1 0 1 0 0.00% 0 61 –61
 Scotland A 1 0 1 0 0.00% 7 49 –42
 Spain 23 16 7 0 72.72% 639 518 +121
 Sweden 1 0 1 0 0.00% 13 20 –7
 Tunisia 2 2 0 0 100.00% 57 41 +16
 Ukraine 9 9 0 0 100.00% 439 115 +324
 United States 8 0 8 0 0.00% 110 280 –170
 USA Selects 1 1 0 0 100.00% 30 21 +9
 Uruguay 9 4 5 0 44.44% 215 231 –16
 Zimbabwe 3 3 0 0 100.00% 92 35 +57
Total 221 110 108 3 48.87% 5633 5384 +249

Individual records[edit]

Most caps[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Won Lost Draw %
1 Yuri Kushnarev Fly-half 2005– 114 98 16 53 59 2 48.21
2 Victor Gresev Flanker 2006– 101 91 10 43 57 1 43.93
3 Andrei Garbuzov Lock 2005– 99 75 24 44 54 1 45.40
4 Vasily Artemyev Centre 2009– 92 88 4 39 51 1 43.88
5 Andrei Kuzin Centre 1997–2011 78 68 10 38 37 3 50.64
6 Alexander Khrokin Prop 1994–2011 76 47 29 36 38 2 48.68
7 Vladislav Korshunov Hooker 2002–2015 73 48 25 32 39 2 45.20
Alexander Voytov Lock 2003–2014 73 67 6 29 42 2 41.09
9 Viacheslav Grachev Flanker 1993–2011 72 70 2 33 37 2 47.22
10 Mikhail Babaev Wing 2006- 71 65 6 33 37 1 47.18

Most tries[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries
1 Vasily Artemyev Centre 2009– 92 88 4 145 29
2 Andrei Kuzin Centre 1997–2011 78 68 10 130 26
3 Vladimir Ostroushko Wing 2006– 50 46 4 125 25
4 Victor Gresev Flanker 2006– 101 91 10 100 20
5 Viacheslav Grachev Flanker 1993–2011 72 70 2 90 19
6 Igor Galinovskiy Wing 2006- 50 43 7 90 18
7 Alexander Gvozdovsky Wing 2005-2010 31 28 3 75 15
Denis Simplikevich Wing 2011- 29 24 5 75 15
9 Evgeni Matveev Centre 2007- 63 26 37 65 13
10 Anton Rudoy Flanker 2016- 20 19 1 60 12

Most points[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1 Yuri Kushnarev Fly-half 2005– 114 777 10 149 141 2
2 Konstantin Rachkov Fly-half 1997–2011 44 316 10 51 41 5
3 Vladimir Simonov Centre 2001-2004 22 168 11 25 18 3
4 Vasily Artemyev Centre 2009– 92 145 29 0 0 0
5 Ramil Gaisin Fly-half 2012– 50 144 7 29 17 0
6 Andrei Kuzin Centre 1997–2011 78 130 26 0 0 0
7 Vladimir Ostroushko Wing 2006– 50 125 25 0 0 0
8 Alexander Yanyushkin Scrum-half 2002–2015 70 116 10 9 16 0
9 Viktor Motorin Scrum-half 1999–2009 41 112 2 24 18 0
10 Victor Gresev Flanker 2006– 101 100 20 0 0 0

Other international teams[edit]

Sevens[edit]

Russia also has a rugby sevens team, which competes in several rounds each year on the World Rugby Sevens Series and in the FIRA-AER Grand Prix Sevens circuit, with Moscow hosting the second leg. The sevens team has recorded wins against Tier 1 nations and recorded their first top eight finish at the 2011 Hong Kong Sevens,[citation needed] and a Bowl win in Glasgow in 2012. The team is two-time European Champion (2007 and 2009), making it the second most successful team at that tournament.

Women[edit]

Russia's women field national rugby union teams in both fifteens, where it appeared at the Women's Rugby World Cup in 1994 and 1998 as Russia and in 1991 as the USSR, and in sevens, which took part in the first Women's Rugby World Cup Sevens in 2009 and which contests the IRB Women's Sevens World Series.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-10-15. Retrieved 2017-07-26.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ RUR Team Media Guide RWC11
  3. ^ Rugby Union of Russia Official Team Media Guide for RWC11
  4. ^ http://www.ferugby.com/noticias.htm
  5. ^ "Official RWC 2011 Site". RugbyWorldCup.com. Retrieved 2010-07-04.
  6. ^ a b "Men's World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  7. ^ Russia rugby statistics

External links[edit]