Russian Mission, Alaska

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Russian Mission

Iqugmiut
Iqurmiut Traditional Council
Russian Mission aerial view.jpg
Russian Mission is located in Alaska
Russian Mission
Russian Mission
Location in Alaska
Coordinates: 61°47′8″N 161°20′3″W / 61.78556°N 161.33417°W / 61.78556; -161.33417Coordinates: 61°47′8″N 161°20′3″W / 61.78556°N 161.33417°W / 61.78556; -161.33417
Country United States
State Alaska
Census AreaKusilvak
ANCSA regional corporationCalista
IncorporatedOctober 28, 1970[1]
Government
 • MayorSheila A. Minock
 • State senatorLyman Hoffman (D)
 • State rep.Tiffany Zulkosky (D)
Area
 • Total5.72 sq mi (14.82 km2)
 • Land5.37 sq mi (13.90 km2)
 • Water0.35 sq mi (0.92 km2)
Elevation
52 ft (16 m)
Population
 • Total312
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
342
 • Density63.71/sq mi (24.60/km2)
Time zoneUTC-9 (Alaska (AKST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-8 (AKDT)
ZIP code
99657
Area code907
FIPS code02-65700
GNIS feature ID1408925

Russian Mission (Iqugmiut in Central Yup'ik; Russian: Рашен-Мишен) is a city in Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska. It was the location of a fur trading post of the Russian-American Company in 1842. After the sale of Russian-American possessions to the United States in 1867, it was officially named Russian Mission in the early 1900s. The sale of alcohol is prohibited. At the 2010 census the population was 312, up from 296 in 2000.

History[edit]

The first Russian-American Company fur trading post on the Yukon River was established here in 1837. The settlement was recorded as a Cup'ik village called "Ikogmiut," meaning "people of the point," in 1842 by the Imperial Russian Navy explorer Lavrenty Zagoskin.

The first Russian Orthodox mission in Interior Alaska was established here in 1851 by the Alutiiq priest Jacob Netzuetov. The mission was called "Pokrovskaya Mission," and the village name was changed to Russian Mission around 1900. It was often confused with a village on the Kuskokwim that was also called "Russian Mission" (or "Little Russian Mission") but which was renamed Chuathbaluk in the 1960s.

The city was incorporated in 1970.[5]

Geography[edit]

Russian Mission is located at 61°47′8″N 161°20′3″W / 61.78556°N 161.33417°W / 61.78556; -161.33417 (61.785522, -161.334074).[6]

Russian Mission is located on the right (western) bank of the Yukon River in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, 25 miles southeast of Marshall. It lies 70 air miles northeast of Bethel and 376 miles west of Anchorage.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.2 square miles (16 km2), of which, 5.7 square miles (15 km2) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) of it (8.27%) is water.

Climate[edit]

Russian Mission falls within the transitional climate zone, characterized by tundra interspersed with boreal forests, and weather patterns of long, cold winters and shorter, warm summers. Heavy northern winds often limit air access in the fall and winter. The Lower Yukon is ice-free from mid-June through October.[7]

Climate data for Russian Mission, Alaska (1966-1987 averages)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 48
(9)
45
(7)
44
(7)
60
(16)
79
(26)
80
(27)
86
(30)
82
(28)
70
(21)
59
(15)
48
(9)
48
(9)
86
(30)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 35.6
(2.0)
35.0
(1.7)
39.8
(4.3)
47.6
(8.7)
64.6
(18.1)
74.2
(23.4)
78.7
(25.9)
74.3
(23.5)
63.2
(17.3)
49.6
(9.8)
39.1
(3.9)
37.5
(3.1)
80.3
(26.8)
Average high °F (°C) 13.6
(−10.2)
13.9
(−10.1)
24.9
(−3.9)
32.8
(0.4)
50.6
(10.3)
60.2
(15.7)
63.8
(17.7)
61.1
(16.2)
51.9
(11.1)
35.3
(1.8)
23.6
(−4.7)
15.1
(−9.4)
37.2
(2.9)
Daily mean °F (°C) 4.3
(−15.4)
4.6
(−15.2)
13.6
(−10.2)
22.0
(−5.6)
41.1
(5.1)
50.5
(10.3)
54.5
(12.5)
52.4
(11.3)
43.0
(6.1)
28.0
(−2.2)
16.1
(−8.8)
6.5
(−14.2)
28.1
(−2.2)
Average low °F (°C) −5.0
(−20.6)
−4.8
(−20.4)
2.2
(−16.6)
11.1
(−11.6)
31.5
(−0.3)
40.7
(4.8)
45.2
(7.3)
43.7
(6.5)
34.0
(1.1)
20.6
(−6.3)
8.5
(−13.1)
−2.1
(−18.9)
18.8
(−7.3)
Mean minimum °F (°C) −31.8
(−35.4)
−33.4
(−36.3)
−23.1
(−30.6)
−14
(−26)
14.8
(−9.6)
28.1
(−2.2)
34.5
(1.4)
31.4
(−0.3)
20.0
(−6.7)
−0.1
(−17.8)
−14.7
(−25.9)
−30.4
(−34.7)
−45.4
(−43.0)
Record low °F (°C) −54
(−48)
−50
(−46)
−45
(−43)
−38
(−39)
−21
(−29)
10
(−12)
27
(−3)
21
(−6)
13
(−11)
−20
(−29)
−31
(−35)
−44
(−42)
−54
(−48)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.41
(36)
0.65
(17)
1.12
(28)
1.16
(29)
0.88
(22)
1.58
(40)
2.49
(63)
2.98
(76)
2.33
(59)
2.11
(54)
1.86
(47)
1.95
(50)
20.52
(521)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 16.5
(42)
5.7
(14)
7.9
(20)
7.4
(19)
0.2
(0.51)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
3.1
(7.9)
13.3
(34)
16.4
(42)
70.5
(179.41)
Source: "http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ak8054" [8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880148
1890140−5.4%
190016618.6%
192090
193054−40.0%
194034−37.0%
19505561.8%
196010285.5%
197014643.1%
198016915.8%
199024645.6%
200029620.3%
20103125.4%
Est. 2018342[4]9.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]

Russian Mission first reported on the 1880 U.S. Census as Ikogmute Mission, an unincorporated Inuit village & Russian Orthodox Mission.[10] It appeared on the 1890 census as "Ikogmiut", but included the nearby village of "Pokrovskaia" (called Pogoreshapka on the 1880 U.S. Census).[11] In 1900, it was returned again as Ikogmute Mission.[12] In 1920, it would be officially returned as Russian Mission. It would formally incorporate in 1970.

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 296 people, 70 households, and 60 families residing in the city. The population density was 52.3 people per square mile (20.2/km²). There were 81 housing units at an average density of 14.3 per square mile (5.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 6.08% White, and 93.92% Native American.

There were 70 households out of which 67.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 24.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.9% were non-families . 10.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.23 and the average family size was 4.51.

In the city, the age distribution of the population shows 48.0% under the age of 18, 12.5% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 11.5% from 45 to 64, and 4.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 19 years. For every 100 females, there were 109.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,500, and the median income for a family was $22,500. Males had a median income of $17,083 versus $13,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $8,358. About 15.6% of families and 21.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.7% of those under the age of eighteen and 15.4% of those sixty five or over.

Most residents are Russian Orthodox, with a Roman Catholic minority.

Transportation[edit]

Russian Mission is served by Russian Mission Airport. Passengers, mail, and light goods arrive primarily by air. A gravel airstrip and seaplane landing area are owned and operated by the state. Scheduled daily flights are available.

Russian Mission's location on the Yukon River allows barge and small boat travel during the summer.

Snowmachines are used in inter-village transportation in the winter, and a trail is marked to Kalskag[disambiguation needed] (25 mi).

Education[edit]

K-12 students attend Russian Mission School, operated by the Lower Yukon School District.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1996 Alaska Municipal Officials Directory. Juneau: Alaska Municipal League/Alaska Department of Community and Regional Affairs. January 1996. p. 127.
  2. ^ "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 1, 2019.
  3. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Alaska". United States Census Bureau. 2008-07-10. Archived from the original on 2008-09-12. Retrieved 2008-07-14.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  5. ^ "Russian Mission, Alaska". State of Alaska, Division of Community and Regional Affairs. Retrieved 2019-10-17.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. ^ "Russian Mission, Alaska". State of Alaska, Division of Community and Regional Affairs. Retrieved 2019-10-17.
  8. ^ http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ak8054. Retrieved April 6, 2013. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  10. ^ http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1880a_v1-17.pdf
  11. ^ "Report on Population and Resources of Alaska at the Eleventh Census, 1890". 1893.
  12. ^ http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/33405927v1ch07.pdf
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.