Russian legislative election, 2016

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Russian legislative election, 2016

← 2011 18 September 2016 2021 →

All 450 seats to the State Duma
226 seats needed for a majority
Turnout 47.88%

  First party Second party Third party
  Dmitry Medvedev 2016.jpg Gennady Zyuganov, 2013.jpeg Vladimir Zhirinovsky in 2015.jpg
Leader Dmitry Medvedev Gennady Zyuganov Vladimir Zhirinovsky
Party United Russia Communist Party LDPR
Leader since 26 May 2012 14 February 1993 12 April 1991
Leader's seat Federal List Federal List Federal List
Last election 238 seats, 49.32% 92 seats, 19.19% 56 seats, 11.67%
Seats won 343[1] 42 39
Seat change Increase 105 Decrease 50 Decrease 17
Popular vote 28,527,828 7,019,752 6,917,063
Percentage 54.20% 13.34% 13.14%
Swing Increase 4.87% Decrease 5.85% Increase 1.47%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Sergey Mironov 2014-05-01 1.jpg
Leader Sergey Mironov Aleksey Zhuravlyov Rifat Shaykhutdinov
Party A Just Russia Rodina Civic Platform
Leader since 27 October 2013 29 September 2012 17 April 2015
Leader's seat Federal List Anna / Federal List Neftekamsk / Federal List
Last election 64 seats, 13.24%
Seats won 23 1 1
Seat change Decrease 41 Increase1 Increase1
Popular vote 3,275,053 792,226 115,433
Percentage 6.22% 1.51% 0.22%
Swing Decrease 7.02% Increase1.51% Increase 0.22%

2016 Russian legislative election maps.svg
The upper map shows the winning party vote in the territorial election commissions, the lower map shows the party of the winner and his vote in the single mandate constituencies.

Chairman before election

Sergey Naryshkin
United Russia

Chairman

Vyacheslav Volodin
United Russia

This article is part of a series on the
Politics of the
Russian Federation
Coat of Arms of the Russian Federation 2.svg

Legislative elections were held in Russia on 18 September 2016, having been brought forward from 4 December.[2] At stake were the 450 seats in the State Duma of the 7th convocation, the lower house of the Federal Assembly of Russia. Prior to the election United Russia had been the ruling party since winning the 2011 elections with 49.32% of the vote, and taking 238 seats (53%) of the seats in the State Duma.

Prior to the election, observers expected that turnout would be low and called the election campaign the dullest in recent memory.[3]

109,820,679 voters were registered in the Russian Federation (including Crimea[nb 1]) on 1 January 2016. Taking into account people registered outside the Russian Federation and the voters in Baikonur, the total number of eligible voters for 1 January 2016 was 111,724,534.[5] The vote had a record low turnout of 47.88%,[6] with just 28% of Muscovites casting their votes before 6pm.[7]

Background[edit]

Although the elections had been planned for 4 December 2016, deputies discussed the issue of rescheduling to an earlier date since the spring of 2015, with the second and third Sundays of September or October 2016 as possible alternatives. On 1 July 2015 the Constitutional Court of Russia accepted the possibility of conducting early elections to the Duma in 2016 under certain conditions. According to the Court, the constitution does not require the election date to be exactly five years after the previous elections and the election date can be shifted if the following conditions are met:[8]

  • Shifting of the election date does not disrupt reasonable periodicity of elections.
  • Limiting of the real terms of the Duma deputies is insignificant (less than a few months).
  • Shifting of the election dates is announced in advance, so to give all the parties enough time to prepare for the elections.

On 19 June 2015 the State Duma approved the first reading of a bill to bring the election to the State Duma forward from 4 December 2016 to the third Sunday of September 2016. The corresponding bill was adopted by the State Duma on the second and third (and final) reading with 339 deputies in favour and 102 against, with no abstentions. The document was put together by the speaker of the Duma, Sergei Naryshkin, and the three leaders of the Duma factions, Vladimir Vasilyev (United Russia), Vladimir Zhirinovsky (LDPR), and Sergei Mironov (A Just Russia). The initiative to transfer the date of elections had not been supported by the deputies of the Communist Party, who called it an unconstitutional decision. Earlier, a similar opinion was expressed by the leader of the Communist Party, Gennady Zyuganov. The September elections were not satisfactory to the Communists in part because the debate fell in August, "when one will be in the garden, the latter on the beach, others with their children" said Zyuganov. The Russian government supported the bill.

On 17 June 2016 President Vladimir Putin signed a decree on the appointment of the State Duma elections on 18 September 2016.[9] From that day parties had the right to start the nomination process for deputies to hold congresses and transmit documents of candidates to the Central Election Commission of the Russian Federation (CEC) for registration.[10]

For the first time since the controversial and unilateral 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea (from Ukraine), Crimean voters could vote in a Russian general election.[3] Ukraine strongly condemned the vote.[11] Various countries (among them the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and France) did not recognize the legitimacy of the election in Crimea.[12][13][14] According to Russia correspondent for Al Jazeera English Rory Challands, (on election day) "Despite many Crimeans voting in Russian elections for 1st time, there's little excitement. Main sentiments so far are apathy and cynicism."[15] Scuffles between police and Ukrainian nationalists were reported near polling stations for Russian citizens in (the Ukrainian cities) Kiev and Odessa.[3][16]

In Syria, 4,751 Russian citizens (most of them taking part in the Russian military intervention in Syria) voted.[17]

Electoral system[edit]

Single-member constituency map adopted in 2015.

The State Duma is elected on a single election day for a term of five years, with parallel voting that was used between 1993 and 2003.

Out of 450 seats, 225 are elected by proportional representation from party lists with a 5% electoral threshold, the whole country forming a single constituency. Each political party should adopt a party list which should be divided into a federal part and regional groups. The federal part should have from 1 to 10 candidates, with the rest of the party list candidates comprising the regional groups. There should be at least 35 regional groups. Total number of candidates in a party list should be between 200 and 400.

Seats are allocated using Hare quota and largest remainder method.

The other 225 seats are elected in single-member constituencies using the first-past-the-post system.[18]

Chronology[edit]

A supporter of United Russia handing out leaflets in the street

On June 17, President Vladimir Putin set the date of the election as 18 September 2016. On June 20 the Central Election Commission approved the calendar of the election campaign.[19]

  • From June 18 to July 13 — Period for nomination of candidates (parties in the federal list and single-mandate constituencies, self-nominated in single member constituencies).
  • From July 4 to August 3 — Period of registration of federal lists of candidates to the Central Election Commission and of the registration of candidates in single-member constituencies in the district election commissions.
  • August 12 — Draw that decided allocation of parties on the federal-list ballot was held.[20]
  • August 16 and 18 — Draw that decided distribution of free TV time (August 16) and free space for parties or candidates in newspapers (August 18) was held.[21]
  • From August 20 to September 16 — Election campaign.
  • From 3 August to 6 September — Territorial election commissions issue absentee ballots.
  • From 7 to 17 September — Voters can get absentee ballots through election commissions at polling station.
  • September 17 — Day of Election silence.
  • September 18 — Election day.

Conduct[edit]

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe published its full report of the election on 23rd December 2016. It noted many problems with the election, such as the lack of "clear political alternatives [with the main four parliamentary parties, limiting] voters' choice", over-regulation of the registration of political parties, lack of proper conduct during counting of votes, voters not folding their ballots on 70% of occasions and lack of transparency of campaign finance.[22]

Participating parties[edit]

The Central Election Commission determined that 14 political parties could submit lists of candidates without collecting signatures.[23] Whilst other parties were required to present at least 200,000 signatures (with a maximum of 7,000 signatures per region).[18]

Parties that participated in the election[edit]

Fourteen parties were registered to participate in the election. These are the same fourteen parties that did not have to collect signatures in order to participate. None of the parties tasked with collecting signatures were registered on the ballot due to various violations or failure to submit documents.

№ on ballot Party Abb. Party leader № 1 in party list Convention date[24] Ideology Contesting on party list? [25] Contesting on SMC? [25] Notes
1 Rodina Rodina Aleksey Zhuravlyov Aleksey Zhuravlyov 2 July 2016 National conservatism / Ultranationalism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 8[26]
2 Communists of Russia CoR Maxim Suraykin Maxim Suraykin 1 July 2016 Communism / Marxism–Leninism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 3[27]
3 Russian Party of Pensioners for Justice RPPJ Vladimir Burakov Vladimir Burakov 9 July 2016 Social conservatism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 12[28]
4 United Russia UR Dmitry Medvedev Dmitry Medvedev 26–27 June 2016 Statism / Centrism / National conservatism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 12[29]
5 Russian Ecological Party "The Greens" Greens Anatoly Panfilov (ru) Oleg Mitvol 6 July 2016 Environmentalism / Centrism / Green politics CEC registered the list of candidates on July 29[30]
6 Civic Platform CPl Rifat Shaykhutdinov Rifat Shaykhutdinov 2 July 2016 Conservatism / Economic Liberalism CEC registered the list of candidates on July 27[31]
7 Liberal Democratic Party of Russia LDPR Vladimir Zhirinovsky Vladimir Zhirinovsky 28 June 2016 Russian nationalism / Pan-Slavism / Euroscepticism / Anticommunism CEC registered the list of candidates on July 18[32]
8 People's Freedom Party PARNAS Mikhail Kasyanov Mikhail Kasyanov 2 July 2016 Conservative liberalism / Liberal democracy / Pro-Europeanism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 3[33]
9 Party of Growth PoG Boris Titov Boris Titov 4 July 2016 Liberal conservatism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 1[34]
10 Civilian Power CPo Kirill Bykanin Kirill Bykanin 8 July 2016 Liberalism / Green politics CEC registered the list of candidates on August 3[35]
11 Yabloko Yabloko Emilia Slabunova Grigory Yavlinsky 1–3 July 2016 Social liberalism / Pro-Europeanism / Social democracy CEC registered the list of candidates on August 5[36]
12 Communist Party of the Russian Federation CPRF Gennady Zyuganov Gennady Zyuganov 25 June 2016 Communism / Left-wing nationalism CEC registered the list of candidates on August 1[37]
13 Patriots of Russia PoR Gennady Semigin Gennady Semigin 1 July 2016 Democratic socialism / Left-wing nationalism CEC registered the list of candidates on July 27[38]
14 A Just Russia JR Sergey Mironov Sergey Mironov 27 June 2016 Social democracy / Democratic socialism CEC registered the list of candidates on July 22[39]

Parties that did not participate in the election[edit]

Party Abb. Party leader № 1 in party list Convention date[24] Ideology Notes
Alliance of Greens and Social Democrats AGSD Alexander Zakondyrin Alexander Zakondyrin 2 July 2016 Grassroots democracy Barred from the election because the party leadership did not notify the CEC about holding a pre-election convention[40]
Great Fatherland Party GFP Nikolai Starikov Nikolai Starikov 28 June 2016 Centrism / National conservatism CEC refused to register the list of candidates[29]
Native Party NP Alexander Samokhin 24 June 2016 Party failed to submit the necessary signatures and as such will not be participating in the election[41]
Party of Good Deeds PGD Andrey Kirillov 2 July 2016 Party did not submit documents to the CEC[42]
Party of the Parents of Future PPF Marina Voronova Party failed to submit the necessary signatures and as such will not be participating in the election[43]
Party of Rural Revival PRR Vasily Vershinin 6 July 2016 Agrarianism Announced that it would not be taking part in the election.[44] However, nominated several candidates in single-member districts
Party of Social Reforms PSR Stanislav Polishchuk 26 June 2016 Barred from the election due to critical deficiencies in the documents filed with the CEC[45]
People Against Corruption PAC Grigory Anisimov 22 June 2016 Party did not submit documents to the CEC[42]
Revival of Agrarian Russia RAR Vasily Krylov 5 July 2016 Agrarianism CEC refused to certify the list of candidates[46]
Union of Labor UL Alexander Shershukov Svetlana Antropova 21 June 2016 CEC refused to register the list of candidates[29]
Volya Volya Svetlana Peunova Marina Gerasimova 25 June and 2 July 2016 Left-wing nationalism / Democratic socialism / Narodniks Party failed to submit the necessary signatures and as such will not be participating in the election[47]

Single-member constituencies[edit]

In 225 single-member constituencies, candidates could be nominated by a party, or be self-nominated.

Opinion polls[edit]

Opinion polling for ruling party (WCIOM)
Opinion polling for opposition parties (WCIOM)

Exit polls[edit]

Date Poll source UR CPRF LDPR JR PARNAS Yabloko CPl Rodina PoR Greens PoG[nb 2] CoR RPPJ CPo Spoilt vote Lead
18 September 2016 WCIOM 44.5% 14.9% 15.3% 8.1% 1.2% 3.5% 0.3% 2.3% 0.8% 0.8% 1.8% 2.6% 2% 0.2% 1.7% 29.2% over LDPR
18 September 2016 FOM 48.4% 16.3% 14.2% 7.6% 1% 3.2% 0.2% 1.8% 0.6% 0.8% 1.5% 1.5% 1.9% 0.1% ? 32.1% over CPRF

Results[edit]

United Russia won a supermajority of seats, which will allow them to change the Constitution without the votes of other parties. Turnout was reported as low. Throughout the day there were reports of voting fraud including video purporting to show officials stuffing ballot boxes.[48] Additionally, results in many regions demonstrate that United Russia on many poll stations got anomalously close results, for example, 62.2% in more than hundred poll stations in Saratov Oblast. This suggests that the results in these regions likely have been rigged.[49] The government said there was no evidence of any large scale cheating.[50] However, on 22 September the Central Electoral Committee canceled the results in seven constituencies, where the number of used ballots exceeded the number of registered voters, or where the authorities were videotaped stuffing the ballots.[51] According to research by University of Michigan political scientists Kirill Kalinin and Walter R. Mebane, Jr., the election results are fraudulent.[52]

Seat composition before election: JR – 64, CPRF – 92, UR – 238, LDPR – 56
Seat composition after election: UR – 343, CPRF – 42, LDPR – 39, JR – 23, Rodina – 1, CPl – 1, Independent – 1
Party Party list Constituency Total result
Votes % ±pp Seats Votes % Seats Seats +/–
United Russia 28,527,828 55.23 +5.13 140 25,162,770 50.12 203 343 +105
Communist Party of the Russian Federation 7,019,752 13.59 –5.91 35 6,492,145 12.93 7 42 −50
Liberal Democratic Party of Russia 6,917,063 13.39 +1.53 34 5,064,794 10.09 5 39 −17
A Just Russia 3,275,053 6.34 –7.11 16 5,017,645 10.00 7 23 −41
Communists of Russia 1,192,595 2.31 0 1,847,824 3.68 0 New
Yabloko 1,051,335 2.04 –1.45 0 1,323,793 2.64 0 0 0
Russian Party of Pensioners for Justice 910,848 1.76 0 0 New
Rodina 792,226 1.53 0 1,241,642 2.47 1 1 New
Party of Growth 679,030 1.31 +0.71 0 1,171,259 2.33 0 0 0
The Greens 399,429 0.77 0 770,076 1.53 0 0 New
People's Freedom Party 384,675 0.74 0 530,862 1.06 0 0 New
Patriots of Russia 310,015 0.60 –0.39 0 704,197 1.40 0 0 0
Civic Platform 115,433 0.22 0 364,100 0.73 1 1 New
Civilian Power 73,971 0.14 0 79,922 0.16 0 0 New
Independent 429,051 0.85 1 1 +1
Invalid/blank votes 982,596 1,767,725
Total 52,631,849 100 225 51,967,805 100 225 450 0
Registered voters/turnout 110,061,200 47.82 –12.22 109,636,794 47.40
Source: Central Election Commission

By region[edit]

The breakdown of the party-list results by region is as follows:[1]

Region JR CPl CPo CPRF CoR LDPR PoG PoR PARNAS Rodina RPPJ Greens UR Yabloko Turnout Invalid ballots
 Adygea 4.83% 0.13% 0.10% 13.37% 2.23% 12.66% 0.69% 0.24% 0.33% 1.13% 1.35% 0.65% 59.45% 0.89% 53.9%
 Altai Krai 13.78% 0.15% 0.15% 17.25% 3.66% 19.82% 0.84% 0.30% 0.60% 1.15% 1.76% 0.71% 35.19% 2.03% 40.7%
 Altai Republic 4.10% 0.11% 0.14% 18.89% 2.69% 12.73% 0.52% 0.69% 0.94% 5.66% 1.36% 0.55% 48.81% 0.81% 45.1%
 Amur Oblast 4.15% 0.19% 0.17% 16.62% 2.49% 29.02% 0.63% 0.52% 0.45% 1.28% 2.54% 0.72% 37.91% 0.91% 42.4%
 Arkhangelsk Oblast 9.17% 0.17% 0.13% 12.78% 1.97% 19.73% 1.21% 0.45% 0.83% 1.62% 2.99% 0.86% 44.48% 2% 36.5%
 Astrakhan Oblast 17.56% 0.19% 0.17% 14.18% 3.31% 13.13% 0.89% 0.38% 0.73% 1.10% 1.57% 0.64% 42.22% 0.99% 36.9%
 Baikonur 2.42% 0.16% 0.14% 11.98% 1.65% 29.73% 0.79% 0.59% 0.70% 1.94% 2.70% 0.99% 42.64% 1.03% 43.1%
 Bashkortostan 6.88% 0.30% 0.14% 18.62% 1.84% 11.29% 0.36% 0.39% 0.21% 0.69% 0.99% 0.51% 56.37% 0.52% 69.7%
 Belgorod Oblast 7.01% 0.20% 0.12% 14.93% 1.94% 13.73% 0.67% 0.29% 0.44% 1.20% 1.73% 0.68% 54.73% 0.78% 62.1%
 Bryansk Oblast 3.48% 0.19% 0.10% 13.29% 1.83% 10.80% 0.54% 0.32% 0.38% 1.43% 1.26% 0.44% 63.91% 0.76% 55.1%
 Buryatia 6.55% 0.82% 0.14% 20.59% 2.87% 13.54% 3.90% 0.40% 0.52% 0.83% 2.19% 0.57% 43.34% 1.17% 40.5%
 Chechnya 1.12% 0.02% 0.07% 0.02% 0.96% 0.01% 0.16% 0.36% 0.01% 0.26% 0.11% 0.53% 96.29% 0.03% 94.9%
 Chelyabinsk Oblast 17.48% 0.2% 0.15% 12.02% 2.43% 16.73% 1.23% 0.48% 0.94% 1.80% 2.34% 1.07% 38.19% 2.14% 44.4%
 Chukotka Autonomous Okrug 3.13% 0.19% 0.13% 7.76% 1.62% 17.34% 0.70% 0.48% 0.39% 1.21% 2.17% 0.81% 58.8% 0.80% 64.5%
 Chuvashia 10.69% 0.31% 0.18% 13.42% 1.94% 11.72% 0.77% 0.60% 0.63% 1.02% 2.78% 1.01% 50.92% 1.01% 59.3%
 Crimea[nb 3] 2.06% 0.20% 0.09% 5.60% 1.26% 11.14% 0.41% 0.26% 0.54% 1.39% 1.07% 0.69% 72.80% 0.68% 49.1%
 Dagestan 2.20% 0.07% 0.08% 5.35% 0.37% 0.52% 0.47% 0.53% 0.07% 0.32% 0.25% 0.17% 88.90% 0.15% 88.1%
 Ingushetia 9.57% 0.22% 0.54% 5.65% 0.20% 1.65% 2.14% 2.20% 0.06% 3.85% 0.11% 0.88% 72.41% 0.20% 81.4%
 Irkutsk Oblast 5.19% 0.30% 0.13% 24.08% 3.09% 17.01% 1.25% 0.87% 0.48% 1.46% 1.95% 0.89% 39.77% 1.43% 34.6%
 Ivanovo Oblast 7.31% 0.23% 0.10% 18.08% 3.07% 17.67% 1.09% 0.55% 0.94% 1.48% 2.53% 0.94% 42.38% 2.02% 38.5%
 Jewish Autonomous Oblast 2.80% 0.16% 0.14% 17.11% 3.31% 21.90% 0.65% 0.43% 0.45% 0.98% 1.94% 0.65% 45.03% 0.93% 39.6%
 Kabardino-Balkaria 2.09% 0.01% 0.01% 18.90% 0.11% 0.15% 0.24% 0.11% 0.01% 0.06% 0.02% 0.54% 77.71% 0.04% 90.1%
 Kaliningrad Oblast 5.62% 0.21% 0.14% 13.99% 2.76% 16.60% 2.30% 3.42% 1.04% 2.03% 2.21% 0.81% 43.39% 2.37% 44.0%
 Kalmykia 3.18% 0.27% 0.11% 11.69% 1.56% 4.29% 0.58% 2.31% 0.34% 0.50% 1.24% 0.42% 70.61% 1.42% 57.5%
 Kaluga Oblast 6.21% 0.17% 0.13% 15.95% 2.40% 17.38% 1.33% 0.60% 0.86% 1.87% 2.41% 0.91% 45.75% 2.21% 43.1%
 Kamchatka Krai 4.42% 0.22% 0.17% 12.59% 2.54% 21.31% 1.26% 0.74% 0.54% 1.42% 2.37% 0.98% 46.70% 1.40% 39.5%
 Karachay-Cherkessia 1.07% 0.10% 0.05% 7.97% 6.59% 0.64% 0.20% 0.65% 0.40% 0.20% 0.11% 0.10% 81.67% 0.40% 93.3%
 Karelia 10.09% 0.30% 0.13% 13.05% 2.56% 17.57% 1.66% 0.90% 0.82% 1.42% 2.32% 0.95% 37.30% 7.80% 39.6%
 Kemerovo Oblast 4.51% 0.10% 0.09% 7.21% 0.60% 7.72% 0.15% 0.49% 0.16% 0.23% 0.35% 0.17% 77.33% 0.44% 86.7%
 Khabarovsk Krai 4.52% 0.23% 0.17% 16.46% 3.31% 25.01% 1.11% 0.42% 1.13% 1.60% 2.99% 1.22% 37.31% 1.85% 36.9%
 Khakassia 7.17% 0.17% 0.14% 20.90% 3.49% 19.52% 0.86% 0.76% 0.70% 1.32% 2.09% 1.03% 38.06% 1.44% 39.4%
 Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug 5.57% 0.22% 0.15% 9.69% 2.15% 22.31% 1.03% 0.59% 0.62% 2.25% 2.17% 0.77% 47.61% 1.13% 39.2%
 Kirov Oblast 9.46% 0.23% 0.16% 13.58% 2.64% 24.94% 1.40% 0.36% 0.56% 1.43% 2.38% 0.74% 37.96% 1.63% 41.9%
 Komi Republic 8.82% 0.25% 0.22% 12.49% 3.67% 22.59% 1.23% 0.69% 0.85% 1.86% 3.51% 1.12% 37.85% 1.76% 40.7%
 Kostroma Oblast 8.05% 0.15% 0.10% 21.40% 3.17% 18.85% 1.32% 0.30% 0.81% 2.73% 2.32% 0.74% 36.56% 1.77% 39.4%
 Krasnodar Krai 3.69% 0.19% 0.14% 12.63% 1.98% 13.76% 1.21% 0.42% 0.54% 1.55% 1.62% 0.61% 59.30% 0.97% 51.2%
 Krasnoyarsk Krai 4.86% 0.26% 0.16% 14.41% 3.06% 20.26% 1.02% 5.13% 0.77% 1.84% 2.20% 1.15% 40.45% 1.57% 36.6%
 Kurgan Oblast 13.79% 0.14% 0.11% 14.56% 3.03% 18.83% 0.66% 0.42% 0.51% 1.40% 1.93% 0.60% 41.51% 0.96% 41.8%
 Kursk Oblast 4.55% 0.21% 0.13% 12.83% 3.55% 15.66% 0.74% 2.61% 0.55% 1.24% 1.62% 0.92% 51.70% 1.28% 47.0%
 Leningrad Oblast 9.61% 0.23% 0.14% 10.37% 2.22% 13.30% 2.46% 0.37% 0.95% 1.81% 2.13% 0.90% 50.04% 2.57% 44.1%
 Lipetsk Oblast 5.96% 0.15% 0.11% 13.68% 1.99% 12.33% 0.69% 0.45% 0.51% 1.80% 2.50% 0.49% 56.19% 1.20% 52.6%
 Magadan Oblast 7.72% 0.35% 0.10% 14.84% 2.74% 19.15% 1.22% 0.48% 0.64% 1.26% 2.51% 0.87% 44.69% 1.08% 40.5%
 Mari El 4.60% 0.21% 0.10% 27.28% 4.11% 10.44% 0.55% 0.24% 0.42% 0.96% 1.23% 0.60% 46.70% 0.86% 53.3%
 Mordovia 2.49% 0.06% 0.05% 5.16% 0.60% 5.19% 0.18% 0.20% 0.15% 0.29% 0.33% 0.14% 84.36% 0.31% 83.0%
 Moscow 6.54% 0.32% 0.25% 13.90% 1.97% 13.09% 3.55% 0.60% 2.62% 3.52% 2.93% 1.77% 37.76% 9.53% 35.2%
 Moscow Oblast 5.02% 0.25% 0.17% 15.24% 2.04% 14.89% 1.90% 0.62% 1.19% 2.57% 2.56% 1.34% 45.99% 3.45% 37.9%
 Murmansk Oblast 8.72% 1.13% 0.17% 11.13% 2.73% 19.97% 1.38% 0.41% 1.00% 1.79% 3.26% 1.09% 41.98% 2.28% 39.7%
 Nenets Autonomous Okrug 4.41% 0.21% 0.20% 18.45% 2.87% 21.80% 1.02% 0.51% 0.77% 2.22% 2.24% 1.08% 41.11% 1.23% 44.8%
 Nizhny Novgorod Oblast 5.11% 0.14% 0.12% 12.83% 2.26% 12.36% 0.94% 0.40% 0.68% 1.70% 1.69% 0.52% 58.15% 1.30% 44.4%
 North Ossetia-Alania 1.86% 0.05% 0.04% 22.18% 0.74% 1.75% 0.17% 3.92% 0.10% 0.98% 0.25% 0.22% 67.09% 0.15% 85.6%
 Novgorod Oblast 12.60% 0.25% 0.14% 15.67% 2.58% 16.18% 1.78% 0.42% 0.75% 1.34% 2.33% 0.81% 40.05% 2.81% 39.8%
 Novosibirsk Oblast 5.61% 0.26% 0.13% 19.55% 3.48% 19.55% 0.96% 0.37% 1.04% 3.13% 1.82% 0.84% 38.26% 2.30% 34.9%
 Omsk Oblast 6.24% 0.24% 0.16% 25.21% 4.55% 15.61% 1.98% 0.31% 0.74% 1.27% 1.72% 0.64% 36.32% 1.91% 38.7%
 Orenburg Oblast 5.39% 0.21% 0.13% 18.38% 3.08% 22.66% 1.02% 0.62% 0.60% 1.04% 1.68% 0.55% 40.85% 1.35% 41.6%
 Oryol Oblast 5.63% 0.24% 0.12% 17.86% 3.74% 15.33% 0.94% 0.38% 0.64% 1.13% 1.73% 0.75% 47.93% 1.10% 53.5%
 Penza Oblast 4.44% 0.12% 0.08% 12.48% 2.12% 10.02% 0.58% 0.24% 0.47% 0.89% 1.37% 0.47% 64.26% 1.03% 60.6%
 Perm Krai 9.02% 0.21% 0.16% 14.24% 3.36% 15.75% 1.74% 0.35% 0.86% 1.45% 2.24% 0.69% 42.65% 3.07% 35.1%
 Primorsky Krai 5.16% 0.21% 0.17% 17.95% 3.38% 19.66% 1.51% 0.45% 0.86% 1.87% 3.80% 0.82% 38.99% 1.79% 37.3%
 Pskov Oblast 7.27% 0.19% 0.18% 17.41% 2.59% 14.23% 1.18% 0.71% 0.53% 1.47% 2.17% 0.81% 45.15% 4.14% 42.1%
 Rostov Oblast 4.34% 0.20% 0.12% 13.60% 2.29% 12.49% 0.82% 0.34% 0.57% 1.53% 1.58% 0.58% 58.79% 1.18% 48.2%
 Ryazan Oblast 5.00% 0.18% 0.10% 13.99% 2.58% 14.99% 0.82% 0.30% 0.73% 1.49% 1.85% 0.72% 54.52% 1.34% 43.3%
 Saint Petersburg 6.90% 0.28% 0.31% 11.31% 1.23% 11.36% 8.52% 0.44% 2.18% 2.62% 2.19% 1.53% 39.71% 9.08% 32.5%
 Sakha Republic 15.20% 0.82% 0.16% 14.35% 3.14% 10.70% 0.73% 0.30% 0.49% 1.56% 2.34% 0.82% 46.42% 1.16% 48.1%
 Sakhalin Oblast 3.40% 0.21% 0.14% 15.44% 3.25% 20.03% 1.07% 0.59% 0.72% 1.72% 3.00% 0.90% 45.44% 1.74% 37.1%
 Samara Oblast 4.47% 0.51% 0.16% 15.94% 2.75% 14.27% 1.45% 0.36% 0.91% 1.33% 1.44% 0.86% 50.77% 1.99% 52.8%
 Saratov Oblast 4.22% 0.14% 0.18% 10.36% 2.06% 9.36% 0.59% 0.53% 0.36% 1.03% 0.76% 0.49% 68.17% 0.89% 64.4%
 Sevastopol[nb 4] 5.09% 0.12% 0.07% 12.07% 1.90% 15.36% 3.58% 0.30% 0.56% 2.29% 0.98% 0.78% 53.78% 0.65% 47.0%
 Smolensk Oblast 4.35% 0.20% 0.11% 15.82% 2.23% 19.42% 0.86% 0.59% 0.64% 1.38% 2.10% 0.72% 48.13% 1.33% 40.3%
 Stavropol Krai 4.34% 0.18% 0.15% 13.19% 2.67% 15.52% 1.02% 0.42% 0.52% 1.29% 1.72% 0.85% 54.26% 0.99% 42.0%
 Sverdlovsk Oblast 13.20% 0.35% 0.16% 11.88% 2.61% 16.54% 1.47% 0.50% 0.97% 1.57% 3.03% 1.25% 40.53% 2.90% 41.4%
 Tambov Oblast 3.89% 0.11% 0.09% 10.77% 1.76% 7.76% 0.42% 0.21% 0.39% 7.21% 0.94% 0.38% 63.51% 0.87% 49.2%
 Tatarstan 2.26% 0.12% 0.11% 4.07% 3.02% 2.25% 0.23% 0.20% 0.27% 0.41% 0.49% 0.20% 85.27% 0.55% 78.7%
 Tomsk Oblast 7.33% 0.20% 0.17% 12.58% 3.52% 20.46% 1.84% 0.50% 1.10% 1.45% 1.91% 1.55% 40.67% 3.71% 33.8%
 Tula Oblast 4.47% 0.17% 0.13% 14.41% 2.61% 14.28% 0.98% 0.32% 0.77% 1.79% 2.60% 0.99% 53.02% 1.76% 45.6%
 Tuva 4.35% 0.10% 0.09% 4.17% 1.15% 3.12% 0.23% 0.24% 0.47% 0.25% 0.94% 0.26% 82.61% 0.93% 89.7%
 Tver Oblast 9.61% 0.17% 0.14% 15.23% 2.18% 16.35% 1.07% 0.41% 0.79% 1.94% 2.26% 0.76% 45.00% 1.92% 41.6%
 Tyumen Oblast 11.45% 0.14% 0.11% 12.27% 0.50% 14.12% 0.25% 0.24% 0.20% 0.35% 0.53% 0.23% 58.35% 0.39% 81.1%
 Udmurtia 8.91% 0.31% 0.13% 13.93% 2.24% 12.28% 3.18% 0.67% 0.61% 1.15% 1.82% 0.62% 50.52% 1.19% 44.4%
 Ulyanovsk Oblast 3.34% 0.21% 0.12% 19.16% 3.24% 15.99% 1.81% 0.46% 0.61% 1.13% 1.89% 0.54% 48.46% 1.23% 52.3%
 Vladimir Oblast 7.61% 0.39% 0.15% 13.03% 3.37% 17.96% 1.25% 0.42% 0.84% 1.94% 3.04% 0.99% 45.20% 1.77% 38.4%
 Volgograd Oblast 5.61% 0.16% 0.11% 14.94% 2.53% 16.17% 0.88% 0.79% 0.73% 1.27% 1.82% 0.73% 50.64% 1.76% 42.1%
 Vologda Oblast 10.54% 0.23% 0.15% 13.87% 2.76% 21.40% 1.45% 0.40% 0.97% 1.40% 4.03% 1.00% 37.21% 2.43% 40.8%
 Voronezh Oblast 7.07% 0.12% 0.10% 15.59% 1.98% 9.25% 0.70% 0.54% 0.53% 1.48% 1.28% 0.56% 58.67% 0.97% 53.7%
 Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 4.74% 0.28% 0.27% 6.86% 1.15% 14.02% 0.65% 0.46% 0.43% 0.73% 0.90% 0.49% 67.14% 0.67% 74.3%
 Yaroslavl Oblast 10.27% 0.28% 0.11% 16.04% 2.19% 17.36% 1.43% 0.59% 1.26% 2.50% 2.51% 1.46% 38.43% 3.77% 37.8%
 Zabaykalsky Krai 4.17% 0.35% 0.16% 15.93% 3.38% 26.40% 0.66% 0.81% 0.50% 1.19% 2.13% 0.78% 39.87% 0.82% 38.9%
Total 6.23% 0.22% 0.14% 13.34% 2.27% 13.14% 1.29% 0.59% 0.73% 1.51% 1.73% 0.76% 54.19% 1.99% 47.8%


Turnout (red) and United Russia vote (blue)
KPRF (red) vs LDPR (blue), percentage difference based on total number of registered voters

By constituency[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Recognized by most members of the UN as part of Ukraine.[4]
  2. ^ In opinion polls often found under the old name of "Right Cause"
  3. ^ Recognized by most members of the UN as part of Ukraine[53][54][55][56]
  4. ^ Recognized by most members of the UN as part of Ukraine[53]

References[edit]

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    UN General Assembly adopts resolution affirming Ukraine's territorial integrity, China Central Television (28 March 2014)
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External links[edit]