2004 Russian presidential election

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2004 Russian presidential election

← 2000 14 March 2004 2008 →
Opinion polls
Turnout64.3% Decrease 4.3 pp
  Vladimir Putin (1).jpg Nikolay Kharitonov 5 December 2000 (1).jpg
Nominee Vladimir Putin Nikolay Kharitonov
Party Independent Communist Party
Home state Moscow Moscow
Popular vote 49,558,328 9,514,554
Percentage 71.9% 13.8%

2004 Russian presidential election map.svg
  Constituencies won by Vladimir Putin
  Constituencies won by Nikolay Kharitonov

President before election

Vladimir Putin
Independent

Elected President

Vladimir Putin
Independent

The 2004 Russian presidential election was held on 14 March 2004.[1] Incumbent President Vladimir Putin was seeking a second full four-year term. He was re-elected with 71.9% of the vote.

Candidates[edit]

Registered candidates[edit]

Candidates are listed in the order they appear on the ballot paper (alphabetical order in Russian).

Candidate name, age,
political party
Political offices Details
Sergey Glazyev
(43)
Independent
(campaign)
Sergey Glazyev RN MOW 04-2011.jpg Leader of the Rodina party
(2003-2004)
Deputy of the State Duma
(1993-1995 and 1999–2007)
Minister of Foreign Economic Relations of Russia
(1992-1993)
Glazyev was Minister of Foreign Economic Relations of Russia under Boris Yeltsin, a Communist member of the State Duma and in 2003 became co-chairman of the newly established Rodina party. However, he failed to win the Rodina nomination because of a power struggle with Dmitri Rogozin, and ran as independent candidate. He campaigned as a critic of economic reforms. He argued that post-Communist governments have ignored social justice and promised to improve welfare.
Oleg Malyshkin
(52)
Liberal Democratic Party
(campaign)
Oleg Malyshkin.jpg Deputy of the State Duma
(2003-2007)
Malyshkin was nominated by the Liberal Democratic Party, after the party leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky, who contested the last three presidential elections, chose not to run again. Malyshkin, a mining engineer, had been an LDPR member since 1991 and the head of security of Vladimir Zhirinovsky. He was elected to the State Duma in 2003.
Sergey Mironov
(51)
Russian Party of Life
(campaign)
S M Mironov.jpg Chairman of the Federation Council
(2001-2011)
Senator from Saint Petersburg
(2001-2011)
Mironov was Chairman of the Federation Council, the upper house of the Russian parliament, and was considered a loyalist to Vladimir Putin. Prior to launching his campaign, he expressed his support for Putin's candidacy.
Vladimir Putin
(51)
Independent
(campaign)
Vladimir Putin.jpg President of Russia
(2000-2008 and 2012-present)
Prime Minister of Russia
(1999-2000 and 2008-2012)
Director of the Federal Security Service
(1998-1999)
Putin, formerly Prime Minister, was elected President in 2000, and ran for a second term. His popularity remained quite high during his term in office thanks to economic stability and despite controversies on media freedoms. He refused United Russia's invitation to be nominated as party candidate and ran as an independent.
Irina Khakamada
(48)
Independent
(campaign)
Irina Hakamada3.jpg Deputy of the State Duma
(1993-2003)
Khakamada, the daughter of a Japanese Communist who took Soviet citizenship in the 1950s, emerged as Putin's most outspoken critic. A member of the State Duma for eight years, she lost her seat in 2003. She was a member of the Union of Rightist Forces, but did not run as a party candidate. "I am not afraid of the terrorists in power," she told the daily newspaper Kommersant. "Our children must grow up as free people. Dictatorship will not be accepted."
Nikolay Kharitonov
(55)
Communist Party
(campaign)
Nikolay Kharitonov 5 December 2000.jpg Deputy of the State Duma
(1993-present)
Kharitonov was the candidate of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, despite not being a member of the party. A former KGB colonel, he was a member of the Agrarian Party of Russia, an ally of the Communist Party. He was put forward after Communist leader Gennady Zyuganov declined to stand for a third time.

Withdrawn candidates[edit]

Candidate name, age,
political party
Political offices Details Date of withdrawal
Ivan Rybkin
(57)
Independent
(campaign)
Ivan Rybkin 1.jpg Secretary of the Security Council
(1996-1998)
Chairman of the State Duma
(1994-1995)
Deputy of the State Duma
(1993-1996)
Rybkin was former Chairman of the State Duma, the lower house of the Russian parliament, was nominated as a presidential candidate on 29 December 2003. On 7 February 2004, he was registered as a presidential candidate, but after his scandalous disappearance and his appearance in Kiev in February 2004, he withdrew on 6 March.[2] 6 March 2004

Opinion polls[edit]

Conduct[edit]

General assessments[edit]

Observers representing the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe and the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, cited what they called abuses of government resources, bias in the state media and instances of ballot stuffing on election day. According to the ad hoc Committee by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, "the elections were generally well administrated and reflected the consistently high public approval rating of the incumbent president but lacked elements of a genuine democratic contest."

"While on a technical level the election was organized with professionalism, particularly on the part of the Central Election Commission (CEC), the election process overall did not adequately reflect principles necessary for a healthy democratic election process. The election process failed to meet important commitments concerning treatment of candidates by the State-controlled media on a non-discriminatory basis, equal opportunities for all candidates and secrecy of the ballot," reported observers by Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. "Localised instances of election-related abuse of official function, whilst met with an appropriately robust response by the electoral authorities in some instances, reflected a lack of democratic culture, accountability and responsibility, particularly in areas distant from the capital."

Observers representing the Commonwealth of Independent States recognized the election as "free, democratic and fair".[3] The head of the mission Yury Yarov assured that violations identified during the mission didn't affect "free expression of the electors' will and result of the election".

Election campaign[edit]

According to report by an ad hoc Committee by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, "The Presidential Election Law and the Basic Guarantees of Electoral Rights Law provided the legal framework for the presidential elections, laying down conditions for the transparency in the organisation and conduct of the election." Criticizing the election campaign, the Committee claimed as "unreasonable hurdle" the requirement to collect 2 million signatures for submission to the CEC in support of persons seeking registration as candidates. Another concern was, "The Russian Constitution stipulates that in a presidential election, if the turnout is less than 50%, a new round has to be held, with candidates registering anew. This clause raised concerns of authorities on voters turnout and a massive campaign encouraging people to participate in elections had been launched by the CEC and local authorities. In some regions, local authorities overused their power to force people to take part in the elections." The election campaign in general was "low-key and all but invisible, which could be explained by the predictability of the results of the election." Glazyev's manager reported the use of administrative resources by preventing Glazyev from campaigning in the regions; Khakamada claimed that "local authorities were instructed to hamper her meetings with voters".

PACE reported that despite some irregularities, "credit should be given to the election administration which ensured security and professional conduct of the voting process". PACE noted the unusually high turnout in five North Caucasus republics (more than 90%), "Mr Putin received 98.2 % of the vote in Ingushetia, 96.5 % in Kabardino-Balkaria, 94,6 % in Dagestan, 92.3% in Chechnya and 91.25% in North Ossetia. Taking into account that the general turnout of the election was only 64.39%, the election results in these regions seem to be unusually high and one-sided." Considering situation in Chechnya, the Moscow Times quoted election officials in the republic's capital, Grozny, as acknowledging that they had filled in several thousand ballots for Putin.[4]

Media bias[edit]

The report of PACE said that "during the presidential election the International Election Observation Mission concluded that state-controlled media had displayed clear bias in favour of the incumbent in news presentation and coverage of the campaign."

According to the report by Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (OSCE) of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe,

Television is the main source of public information in the Russian Federation. Two State-controlled TV channels have countrywide outreach, while the most significant private TV stations are NTV and Ren TV… The State-controlled media comprehensively failed to meet its legal obligation to provide equal treatment to all candidates, displaying clear favouritism towards Mr. Putin. While the other candidates had access to television and other media, through free airtime and televised debates, their access to the primetime news programmes and current affairs programmes on the State-controlled broadcasters was limited… In contrast to the coverage by State-funded TV channels, private broadcasters monitored by the EOM provided more balanced coverage, with a greater diversity of views.[5]

In the month prior to the election, state-funded Channel One Russia dedicated more than four hours of its news coverage to Putin, with the coverage being overwhelmingly positive.[5] In contrast, the second-most covered candidate on Channel One was Kharitonov, who received a mere 21 minutes of primetime news coverage.[5]

State-funded TV Russia gave Putin nearly two hours of primetime news devoted more than two hours of its primetime news coverage to Putin, with the tone of the coverage being overwhelmingly positive.[5] In contrast, Glazeyev was given only four minutes of coverage, the tone of which ranged from negative to neutral.[5]

TV Centre, a television station that was controlled by the Moscow City administration, provided an hour and 25 minutes of coverage to Putin, with the tone being overwhelmingly positive.[5] In contrast, TV Centre gave Glazeyev a mere seven minutes of coverage, which ranged in tone from negative to neutral.[5]

Private broadcasters were more balanced in their television coverage.[5] REN TV gave 35 minutes of primetime news to Mr. Putin, with 35% of this coverage being negative.[5] They gave Khakamada 22 minutes of coverage which ranged from neutral to positive in tone.[5] NTV gave more than 31 minutes of coverage to Mr. Putin, ranging in tone from neutral to positive.[5] In its analytical news programs, such as Svoboda Slova and Namedni, NTV gave a relatively balanced picture of the main contestants and the State leadership.[5] NTV, however, did not air election debates due to Putin’s refusal to take part.[5] Additionally, NTV did not air special broadcasts for campaign programming citing to low public interest.[5]

Most local television outlets provided very little coverage of the election. What coverage they did provide generally tended to be favorable of Putin.[5]

Many media outlets ignored key developments in the campaign's of Putin's challengers. For instance, very few media outlets (both television and print) carried news of Khakamada's campaign announcement.[6]

Print media displayed a variety of views, with coverage of various outlets being either strongly pro-Putin or strongly anti-Putin in bias.[5]

Calls for boycott[edit]

A few groups, notably the Yabloko party and a number of human rights organizations, encouraged voters to boycott the election.[6] Yabloko's leader Grigory Yavlinsky specifically called for boycotts to take place in protest of what he considered to be, “the slide of the country into authoritarianism.”[6]

Results[edit]

e • d 14 March 2004 Russian presidential election results
Candidates Nominating parties Votes %
Vladimir Putin self-nominated 49,565,238 71.31
Nikolay Kharitonov Communist Party of the Russian Federation 9,513,313 13.69
Sergey Glazyev self-nominated 2,850,063 4.10
Irina Khakamada self-nominated 2,671,313 3.84
Oleg Malyshkin Liberal Democratic Party of Russia 1,405,315 2.02
Sergey Mironov Russian Party of Life 524,324 0.75
Against all 2,396,219 3.45
TOTAL 68,925,785 100.00
Putin
71.31%
Kharitonov
13.69%
Glazyev
4.10%
Khakamada
3.84%
Malyshkin
2.02%
Mirinov
0.75%
Against All
3.45%

Results by federal subject[edit]

Source: CEC

Putin Kharitonov Glazyev Khakamada Malyshkin Mirinov Against All
Federal subject # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Adygea 184,326 75.61% 35,224 14.45% 7,319 3.00% 3,896 1.60% 3,593 1.47% 1,220 0.50% 6,463 2.65%
Agin-Buryat Autonomous Okrug 27,937 84.25% 2,593 7.82% 552 1.66% 1,073 3.24% 394 1.19% 198 0.60% 190 0.57%
Altai Krai 870,385 67.64% 239,222 18.59% 52,636 4.09% 35,246 2.74% 37,691 2.93% 9,838 0.76% 28,725 2.23%
Altai Republic 65,751 73.03% 11,812 13.48% 2,974 3.39% 3,074 3.51% 1,213 1.38% 643 0.73% 1,495 1.71%
Amur Oblast 261,781 64.87% 75,636 18.74% 18,552 3.43% 13,952 3.46% 13,840 3.43% 3,637 0.90% 12,850 3.18%
Arkhangelsk Oblast 483,022 77.45% 58,990 9.46% 18,906 3.03% 26,204 4.20% 11,522 1.85% 4,806 0.77% 16,732 2.68%
Astrakhan Oblast 291,499 66.08% 80,643 18.28% 21,024 4.77% 15,197 3.44% 9,677 2.19% 2,980 0.68% 15,845 3.59%
Bashkortostan 2,365,768 91.78% 102,189 3.96% 28,603 1.11% 28,748 1.12% 12,748 0.49% 8,420 0.33% 18,356 0.71%
Belgorod Oblast 457,183 54.82% 230,326 27.62% 41,404 4.96% 26,492 3.18% 21,356 2.56% 6,941 0.83% 40,478 4.85%
Bryansk Oblast 417,481 63.57% 152,874 23.28% 26,712 4.07% 15,195 2.31% 13,131 2.00% 6,035 0.92% 19,681 3.00%
Buryatia 298,120 66.58% 76,483 17.08% 12,812 2.86% 32,299 7.21% 7,234 1.62% 3,461 0.77% 11,904 2.66%
Chechnya 521,317 92.30% 12,950 2.29% 3,636 0.64% 15,068 2.67% 2,052 0.36% 2,010 0.36% 4,513 0.80%
Chelyabinsk Oblast 1,236,952 70.18% 249,852 14.18% 60,191 3.42% 69,903 3.97% 43,589 2.47% 12,858 0.73% 72,215 4.10%
Chita Oblast 311,661 72.49% 63,530 14.78% 13,381 3.11% 11,033 2.57% 12,304 2.86% 4,000 0.93% 99,26 2.31%
Chukotka Autonomous Okrug 27,912 87.24% 987 3.08% 919 2.25% 969 3.03% 446 1.39% 209 0.65% 542 1.69%
Chuvashia 427,489 67.12% 137,093 21.52% 18,037 2.83% 16,028 2.52% 11,408 1.79% 3,949 0.62% 132,252 2.08%
Dagestan 1,263,386 94.61% 50,866 3.81% 3,231 0.24% 3,426 0.26% 2,158 0.16% 2,255 0.17% 5,815 0.44%
Evenki Autonomous Okrug 6,281 81.09% 336 4.34% 353 4.56% 343 4.43% 108 1.39% 55 0.71% 224 2.89%
Ingushetia 147,527 98.18% 782 0.52% 179 0.12% 157 0.10% 281 0.19% 1,101 0.73% 90 0.06%
Ivanovo Oblast 326,546 67.21% 79,536 16.37% 21,090 4.34% 17,156 3.53% 14,322 2.95% 4,382 0.90% 19,757 4.07%
Irkutsk Oblast 578,241 61.96% 156,401 16.76% 53,551 5.74% 51,951 5.57% 37,180 3.98% 9,345 1.00% 39,283 4.21%
Jewish Autonomous Oblast 61,590 67.87% 14,036 15.47% 2,953 3.25% 3,701 4.08% 3,015 3.32% 877 0.97% 3,580 3.95%
Kaliningrad Oblast 278,819 69.86% 47,068 11.79% 20,063 5.03% 17,515 4.39% 7,880 1.97% 4,342 1.09% 20,005 5.01%
Kabardino-Balkaria 491,916 96.49% 11,310 2.22% 1,880 0.37% 1,562 0.31% 722 0.14% 611 0.12% 1,250 0.25%
Kalmykia 114,713 79.23% 16,115 11.13% 3,283 2.27% 5,790 4.00% 1,390 0.96% 549 0.38% 1,692 1.17%
Kaluga Oblast 327,778 70.16% 68,807 14.73% 20,966 4.49% 17,109 3.66% 8,524 1.82% 3,058 0.65% 17,100 3.66%
Kamchatka Oblast 108,057 71.82% 13,910 9.25% 8,402 5.58% 7,593 5.505% 3,896 2.59% 1,343 0.89% 6,463 4.30%
Karachay-Cherkessia 204,020 82.28% 28,455 11.48% 3,949 1.59% 3,727 1.50% 1,919 0.77% 1,086 0.44% 3,383 1.36%
Karelia 237,778 74.14% 32,482 10.13% 8,599 2.68% 17,364 5.48% 7,241 2.26% 3,540 1.10% 11,414 3.56%
Kemerovo Oblast 1,043,186 71.51% 165,019 11.31% 60,452 4.14% 53,001 3.53% 50,163 3.44% 15,008 1.03% 58,663 4.02%
Khabarovsk Krai 473,495 64.52% 95,555 13.02% 42,096 5.74% 37,204 5.07% 24,496 3.34% 8,215 1.12% 45,727 6.23%
Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Area 480,740 74.84% 47,787 7.44% 22,526 3.51% 33,725 5.25% 18,856 2.94% 4,415 0.69% 29,862 4.65%
Khakassia 135,708 61.41% 40,568 18.36% 15,287 6.92% 8,904 4.03% 7,329 3.32% 2,336 1.06% 8,857 4.01%
Kirov Oblast 459,684 65.52% 137,593 19.61% 32,212 4.59% 23,192 3.31% 18,435 2.63% 6,807 0.97% 19,202 2.74%
Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug 48,091 80.55% 6,232 10.44% 945 1.58% 1,314 2.20% 1,087 1.82% 661 1.11% 732 1.23%
Komi Republic 322,023 73.59% 50,974 11.65% 14,558 3.33% 16,061 3.67% 11,314 2.59% 3,691 0.84% 15,799 3.61%
Koryak Autonomous Okrug 11,050 84.34% 641 4.89% 310 2.37% 428 3.27% 218 1.66% 104 0.79% 163 1.24%
Kostroma Oblast 219,379 69.22% 58,760 18.54% 10,168 3.21% 8,768 2.77% 7,016 2.21% 3,213 1.01% 7,927 2.50%
Krasnodar Krai 1,607,902 67.37% 459,807 19.27% 98,805 4.14% 68,816 2.88% 44,653 1.87% 13,929 0.58% 73,765 3.09%
Krasnoyarsk Krai 671,836 60.31% 123,553 11.09% 191,996 17.23% 44,859 4.03% 23,160 2.08% 7,286 0.65% 43,219 3.88%
Kurgan Oblast 327,005 66.94% 93,588 19.16% 16,955 3.47% 11,486 2.35% 19,518 4.00% 3,523 0.72% 13,022 2.67%
Kursk Oblast 402,171 65.24% 129,919 21.08% 23,479 3.81% 14,645 2.38% 14,591 2.37% 5,310 0.86% 19,934 3.23%
Leningrad Oblast 588,807 77.10% 77,691 10.17% 24,205 3.17% 26,509 3.47% 10,210 1.34% 8,123 1.06% 23,418 3.07%
Lipetsk Oblast 399,465 63.62% 133,637 21.28% 24,439 3.89% 14,352 2.29% 16,675 2.66% 4,700 0.75% 28,613 4.56%
Magadan Oblast 57,145 70.05% 8,444 10.35% 3,605 4.42% 5,087 6.24% 2,497 3.06% 780 0.96% 3,541 4.34%
Mari El 239,483 67.30% 64,551 18.14% 14,635 4.11% 11,522 3.24% 8,540 2.40% 2,959 0.83% 11,017 3.10%
Mordovia 560,327 91.35% 27,807 4.53% 6,172 0.66% 4,038 0.66% 4,057 0.66% 1,471 0.24% 4,626 0.75%
Moscow Oblast 2,249,167 71.12% 336,441 10.64% 184,077 5.82% 132,942 4.20% 49,743 1.57% 19,318 0.61% 162,251 5.13%
Moscow 2,841,620 68.61% 306,085 7.39% 260,438 6.29% 339,496 8.20% 51,068 1.23% 25,708 0.62% 273,465 6.60%
Murmansk Oblast 314,098 74.04% 34,549 8.14% 16,991 4.01% 21,355 5.03% 10,782 2.54% 4,126 0.97% 20,325 4.79%
Nenets Autonomous Okrug 14,944 76.90% 1,638 8.43% 520 2.68% 764 3.93% 391 2.01% 246 1.27% 770 3.96%
Nizhny Novgorod Oblast 1,051,605 65.88% 274,862 17.22% 62,875 3.94% 81,432 5.10% 35,136 2.20% 12,436 0.78% 66,503 4.17%
North Ossetia-Alania 361,248 91.25% 24,806 6.27% 1,995 0.50% 1,795 0.45% 1,297 0.33% 920 0.23% 1,757 0.44%
Novgorod Oblast 214,103 71.74% 41,481 13.90% 10,508 3.52% 10,585 3.55% 7,245 2.43% 2,501 0.84% 10,334 3.46%
Novosibirsk Oblast 795,509 63.10% 272,222 21.59% 56,036 4.44% 54,830 4.35% 22,122 1.75% 7,680 0.61% 39,453 3.13%
Omsk Oblast 699,374 67.03% 181,589 17.40% 38,408 3.68% 42,104 4.04% 32,372 3.10% 7,755 0.74% 32,655 3.13%
Orenburg Oblast 612,399 58.79% 255,960 24.57% 52,017 4.99% 27,684 2.66% 38,258 3.67% 7,597 0.73% 37,834 3.63%
Oryol Oblast 323,066 61.66% 125,903 24.03% 20,365 3.89% 13,202 2.52% 12,009 2.29% 4,034 0.77% 20,092 3.83%
Penza Oblast 477,530 64.56% 149,092 20.16% 41,559 5.62% 18,422 2.49% 16,472 2.23% 5,380 0.73% 23,003 3.11%
Perm Oblast 905,707 72.75% 125,678 10.10% 46,691 3.75% 64,463 5.18% 32,884 2.64% 12,700 1.02% 46,954 3.77%
Primorsky Krai 585,850 59.37% 167,576 16.98% 55,382 5.61% 55,565 5.63% 42,656 4.32% 9,874 1.00% 59,976 6.08%
Pskov Oblast 265,503 70.79% 62,389 16.64% 13,106 3.49% 11,732 3.13% 6,076 1.62% 4,411 1.18% 9,348 2.49%
Rostov Oblast 1,716,325 72.49% 336,636 14.22% 87.455 3.69% 71,206 3.01% 55,200 2.33% 14,524 0.51% 71,108 3.00%
Ryazan Oblast 444,939 73.22% 83,256 13.70% 26,178 4.31% 16,205 2.67% 10,195 1.68% 3,852 0.63% 16,509 2.72%
Saint Petersburg 1,566,995 75.12% 154,124 7.39% 86,259 4.14% 140,669 6.74% 16,740 0.80% 30,475 1.46% 80,556 3.86%
Sakha Republic 326,711 60.76% 53,061 11.33% 15,675 3.35% 40,917 8.74% 7,353 1.57% 3,430 0.73% 16,746 3.58%
Samara Oblast 921,135 63.28% 278,371 19.12% 68,149 4.68% 62,723 4.31% 34,194 2.35% 13,953 0.96% 60,695 4.17%
Saratov Oblast 1,017,875 70.79% 244,829 17.03% 46,051 3.20% 36,804 2.56% 26,770 1.86% 9,055 0.63% 42,412 2.95%
Sakhalin Oblast 154,204 68.41% 31,772 14.10% 9,208 4.09% 11,292 5.01% 5,801 2.57% 1,609 0.71% 9,677 4.29%
Sverdlovsk Oblast 1,506,293 76.34% 153,519 7.78% 70,906 3.59% 109,935 5.57% 43,118 2.19% 13,147 0.67% 55,746 2.83%
Smolensk Oblast 314,778 64.91% 101,276 20.88% 17,902 3.69% 14,651 3.02% 11,477 2.37% 3,796 0.78% 17,932 3.70%
Stavropol Krai 733,188 64.54% 242,181 21.32% 42,948 3.78% 32,861 2.89% 28,061 2.47% 8,354 0.74% 40,159 3.54%
Tambov Oblast 397,402 63.62% 151,831 24.31% 19,317 3.09% 13,100 2.10% 12,337 1.98% 3,675 0.59% 20,892 3.34%
Tatarstan 1,879,023 82.58% 150,048 6.59% 54,853 2.41% 70,767 3.11% 24,644 1.08% 23,188 1.02% 49,655 2.18%
Taymyr Autonomous Okrug 15,786 79.05% 779 3.90% 858 4.30% 1,114 5.58% 445 2.23% 167 0.84% 701 3.51%
Tomsk Oblast 332,703 67.15% 66,185 13.36% 18,428 3.72% 32,679 6.60% 12,172 2.46% 5,481 1.11% 24,199 4.88%
Tula Oblast 482,853 65.50% 136,126 18.46% 37,498 5.09% 23,868 3.24% 14,465 1.96% 4,494 0.61% 32,702 4.44%
Tuva 102,341 87.53% 7,035 6.02% 1,525 1.30% 2,329 1.99% 837 0.72% 545 0.47% 1,197 1.02%
Tver Oblast 462,268 70.59% 100,777 15.39% 26,079 3.98% 22,820 3.48% 12,371 1.89% 5,146 0.79% 22,402 3.42%
Tyumen Oblast 551,259 73.59% 84,047 11.22% 276,617 3.69% 27,484 3.67% 21,028 2.81% 6,095 0.81% 25,493 3.40%
Udmurtia 613,335 75.97% 75,506 9.35% 32,303 4.00% 31,246 3.87% 20,961 2.60% 6,465 0.80% 18,797 2.33%
Ulyanovsk Oblast 443,386 65.91% 129,554 19.26% 37,905 5.63% 15,692 2.33% 14,041 2.09% 5,657 0.84% 18,996 2.82%
Ust-Orda Buryat Autonomous Okrug 43,478 72.76% 8,569 14.34% 1,271 2.13% 2,888 4.83% 1,347 2.25% 559 0.94% 748 1.25%
Vladimir Oblast 474,175 68.83% 106,465 15.45% 30,336 4.40% 20,589 2.99% 16,561 2.40% 5,908 0.86% 28,611 4.15%
Volgograd Oblast 707,613 63.03% 246,482 21.95% 46,503 4.14% 41,324 3.68% 24,858 2.21% 8,288 0.74% 38,620 3.44%
Vologda Oblast 469,296 75.77% 71,269 11.51% 19,583 3.16% 20,106 3.25% 11,439 1.85% 6,500 1.05% 16,664 2.69%
Voronezh Oblast 786,049 65.28% 264,366 21.96% 40,620 3.37% 35,296 2.93% 26,642 2.21% 10,518 0.87% 32,123 2.67%
Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 245,984 84.50% 11,433 3.93% 6,925 2.38% 10,893 3.94% 4,281 1.47% 1,378 0.47% 8,321 2.86%
Yaroslavl Oblast 453,695 70.81% 78,009 12.18% 31,279 4.88% 28,293 4.42% 13,988 2.18% 5,889 0.92% 22,735 3.55%
Other
Baikonur (Khazakstan) 12,970 83.62% 624 4.02% 407 2.62% 536 3.46% 170 1.10% 113 0.73% 595 3.84%
Expatriate voting 232,505 85.13% 13,190 4.83% 6,522 2.39% 10,979 4.02% 1,729 0.63% 1,165 0.43% 5,537 2.03%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1642 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ "Иван Рыбкин снял свою кандидатуру с президентских выборов". Archived from the original on 2018-02-11. Retrieved 2018-02-11.
  3. ^ The CIS observers have called the Russian presidential election democratic and fair Archived 2004-12-14 at the Wayback Machine Lenta.Ru, 15 March 2004
  4. ^ The Moscow Times Archived June 19, 2004, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 14 March 2004 OSCE/ODIHR Election Observation Mission Report". www.osce.org. Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. 2 June 2004. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  6. ^ a b c "RUSSIAN ELECTION WATCH Vol.3, No.5," (PDF). www.belfercenter.org. Harvard University (Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs, Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies) and Indiana University-Bloomington. February 2004. Retrieved October 29, 2018.

External links[edit]