Ryan Reaves

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Ryan Reaves
Ryan Reaves 1 2014-03-23 (1).JPG
Reaves playing with the St. Louis Blues in 2014
Born (1987-01-20) January 20, 1987 (age 35)
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 225 lb (102 kg; 16 st 1 lb)
Position Right wing
Shoots Right
NHL team
Former teams
Minnesota Wild
St. Louis Blues
Pittsburgh Penguins
Vegas Golden Knights
New York Rangers
NHL Draft 156th overall, 2005
St. Louis Blues
Playing career 2007–present

Ryan Reaves (born January 20, 1987) is a Canadian professional ice hockey right winger for the Minnesota Wild of the National Hockey League (NHL). He has previously played for the St. Louis Blues, Pittsburgh Penguins, Vegas Golden Knights, and New York Rangers. He is the son of former gridiron football player, Willard Reaves, who played in the Canadian Football League (CFL) and National Football League (NFL).

Playing career[edit]

Youth[edit]

Reaves began playing hockey at age five and football at age eight.[1] As a youth, Reaves played in the 2000 Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament with the Winnipeg South Monarchs minor ice hockey team.[2] Although he played both football and hockey growing up, after tearing his posterior cruciate ligament during a hockey tournament, he was forced to forfeit football as a sport.[1] His torn ligament made him unable to compete in the football season prior to his Western Hockey League draft year.[3] Reaves was eventually drafted 36th overall by the Brandon Wheat Kings in the 2002 WHL bantam draft.[4] Despite his draft selection, Reaves continued to play for the St. John's-Ravenscourt School hockey team where he led them to the 2004 McDonald's Provincial High School Hockey Championship.[5] Reaves joined the Wheat Kings for his rookie campaign during the 2004–05 season. Prior to the 2005–06 season, Reaves was named an alternate captain alongside Mark Derlago, Riley Day, and Derek LeBlanc.[6]

Professional[edit]

Reaves with the New York Rangers in 2021

St. Louis Blues[edit]

Reaves with the St. Louis Blues in 2014.

Reaves was drafted by the St. Louis Blues 156th overall in the 2005 NHL Entry Draft.[7] On May 15, 2007, Reaves signed a three year entry level contract with the St. Louis Blues.[8] At the conclusion of his major junior season, Reaves attended the Blues 2007 training camp and was reassigned to their American Hockey League affiliate, the Peoria Rivermen.[9] While playing with the Rivermen during the 2007–08 season, he suffered an injury in a game against the Rockford IceHogs and was reassigned to the Blues ECHL affiliate, the Alaska Aces.[10]

Reaves was recalled from the Peoria Rivermen by the Blues on October 10, 2010, after Cam Janssen suffered a concussion from a hit to the head in the Blues season opener on October 9.[11] Reaves made his NHL debut on October 11, 2010, where he served 15 penalty minutes in the Blues' 5–1 win over the Anaheim Ducks.[12] He was returned to Peoria after two games with the Blues as Vladimír Sobotka returned from the Injured reserve list.[13] He later scored his first NHL goal on January 12, 2011, again against the Ducks, on goaltender Jonas Hiller.[14]

Reaves' 2015–16 season was cut short due to a knee injury and he returned to the Blues' lineup weighing 225 instead of his usual 230.[15] During the offseason, he trained with Blues assistant coach/video coach Sean Ferrell.[16]

Pittsburgh Penguins[edit]

On June 23, 2017, after seven seasons with the Blues, Reaves was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins along with a second-round pick (51st overall) in the 2017 NHL Entry Draft in exchange for Oskar Sundqvist and the Penguins' first-round pick (31st overall) in the 2017 draft.[17] In the 2017–18 season, Reaves added muscle to the Penguins lower lines, providing 4 goals and 8 points in 58 games.[citation needed]

Vegas Golden Knights[edit]

On February 23, 2018, Reaves was involved in a trade with the Vegas Golden Knights. The Penguins received Tobias Lindberg from the Golden Knights in exchange for Reaves as part of a three-way trade also involving the Ottawa Senators.[18] Reaves scored the series-winning goal over the Winnipeg Jets that qualified the Golden Knights for the 2018 Stanley Cup Finals.[19] He also scored in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals in a 6–4 Golden Knights victory,[20] though Washington would come back and win the next four games.

On July 1, 2018, Reaves signed a two-year contract with the Golden Knights.[21] He recorded a career-high nine goals and 20 points the subsequent season.

On June 15, 2020, the Golden Knights signed Reaves to a two-year, $3.5 million contract extension.[22]

On May 31, 2021, Reaves was suspended for two games in the second round of the 2021 Stanley Cup playoffs for an injury on Colorado Avalanche skater Ryan Graves.[23]

New York Rangers[edit]

Ryan Reaves with the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2017

On July 29, 2021, the Golden Knights traded Reaves to the New York Rangers for a 2022 third-round draft pick,[24] and on July 31, he signed a one-year contract extension with the team.[25]

Minnesota Wild[edit]

After going scoreless in 12 games with the Rangers to open the 2022–23 season, Reaves was traded by New York to the Minnesota Wild in exchange for a fifth-round pick in the 2025 NHL Entry Draft on November 23, 2022.[26]

Playing style[edit]

Reaves has been described in the NHL as an enforcer, a player who is known for fighting, protecting his players and intimidating the opposition. Despite being known specifically for that role, he is often used on checking lines for aggressive forechecking sequences.[27][28]

Reaves' playstyle has often led to run-ins with the NHL Department of Player Safety. He has been suspended three times during his NHL career for a total of six games (including three playoff games), and has been fined an additional three times. During the second round of the 2021 Stanley Cup playoffs, Reaves received a match penalty for attempting to injure Colorado Avalanche's Ryan Graves, after kneeling on his neck and pulling parts of his hair out. This incident resulted in a 2 game suspension from the NHL. Reaves was suspended for Game 7 of the Golden Knights' second round against the Vancouver Canucks in the 2020 Stanley Cup playoffs for an illegal hit to the head of Vancouver Canucks forward Tyler Motte, and was also suspended three games after boarding San Jose Sharks defenseman Matt Tennyson in 2016.[29][30]

Personal life[edit]

Reaves is the son of Willard Reaves, a former professional football player in the Canadian Football League and National Football League.[31] At the time of his birth in Winnipeg, his father was a member of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. His brother Jordan Reaves is a player with the Edmonton Elks. He also has an older sister named Regina.[32]

Reaves holds both American and Canadian citizenship.[33]

Reaves is the great-great-great-grandson of Bass Reeves,[34] the first black lawman west of the Mississippi River. Bass served as a deputy U.S. marshal in Fort Smith, Arkansas under the direction of judge Isaac Parker, known as the "Hanging Judge".

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2003–04 St. John's-Ravenscourt School HS-MB 19 20 12 32 82
2004–05 Brandon Wheat Kings WHL 64 7 9 16 79 23 2 4 6 43
2005–06 Brandon Wheat Kings WHL 68 14 14 28 91 6 0 1 1 8
2006–07 Brandon Wheat Kings WHL 69 15 20 35 76 11 1 4 5 19
2007–08 Alaska Aces ECHL 9 2 0 2 42 2 0 0 0 22
2007–08 Peoria Rivermen AHL 31 4 3 7 46
2008–09 Peoria Rivermen AHL 57 8 9 17 130 4 0 0 0 2
2009–10 Peoria Rivermen AHL 76 4 7 11 167
2010–11 Peoria Rivermen AHL 50 4 6 10 146
2010–11 St. Louis Blues NHL 28 2 2 4 78
2011–12 St. Louis Blues NHL 60 3 1 4 124 2 0 0 0 0
2012–13 Orlando Solar Bears ECHL 13 6 3 9 34
2012–13 St. Louis Blues NHL 43 4 2 6 79 6 0 0 0 2
2013–14 St. Louis Blues NHL 63 2 6 8 126 6 0 0 0 6
2014–15 St. Louis Blues NHL 81 6 6 12 116 6 1 0 1 0
2015–16 St. Louis Blues NHL 64 3 1 4 68 5 0 0 0 7
2016–17 St. Louis Blues NHL 80 7 6 13 104 11 0 0 0 8
2017–18 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 58 4 4 8 84
2017–18 Vegas Golden Knights NHL 21 0 2 2 10 10 2 0 2 18
2018–19 Vegas Golden Knights NHL 80 9 11 20 74 7 0 0 0 17
2019–20 Vegas Golden Knights NHL 71 8 7 15 47 19 0 4 4 14
2020–21 Vegas Golden Knights NHL 37 1 4 5 27 12 0 1 1 16
2021–22 New York Rangers NHL 69 5 8 13 43 18 0 0 0 12
2022–23 New York Rangers NHL 12 0 0 0 12
NHL totals 767 54 60 114 992 102 3 5 8 100

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Callahan, Tom (November 12, 2007). "Rookie Reaves following dad into professional sports". theahl.com. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  2. ^ "Pee-Wee players who have reached NHL or WHA" (PDF). Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament. 2018. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  3. ^ Molinari, Dave (October 12, 2017). "Ryan Reaves almost played football, until an injury changed his future". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  4. ^ "2002 WHL Bantam Draft Completed". wheatkings.com. May 1, 2002. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  5. ^ Cariou, Chris (March 25, 2004). "Big line leads Eagles to 2nd straight title". Winnipeg Free Press. Winnipeg.icon of an open green padlock
  6. ^ "Moore Named Captain". wheatkings.com. September 22, 2005. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  7. ^ "2005 NHL Entry Draft". National Hockey League. June 26, 2005. Retrieved May 6, 2010.
  8. ^ "Reaves Signs With Blues". wheatkings.com. May 15, 2007. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  9. ^ "Blues Reduce Roster to 39 Players". nhl.com. September 19, 2007. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  10. ^ "Aces Welcome Reaves Back On Eve Of Victoria Series". oursportscentral.com. March 6, 2008. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  11. ^ "Blues recall Reaves from Peoria". St. Louis Blues. October 10, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  12. ^ "Ryan Reaves Makes NHL Debut with St. Louis". oursportscentral.com. October 11, 2010. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  13. ^ "Blues assign Reaves to Peoria". St. Louis Blues. October 17, 2010. Retrieved November 2, 2010.
  14. ^ "Bobby Ryan's Hat Trick Leads Surging Ducks Past Slumping Blues 7-4". thehockeynews.com. January 13, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2020. Ryan Reaves scored his first NHL goal in the final minutes for St. Louis
  15. ^ Rutherford, Jeremy P. (October 7, 2016). "Reaves lighter and faster going into Blues' season". St. Louis Today. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  16. ^ "Determined to stay in game, Reaves changed playing style". ksdk.com. October 29, 2016. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  17. ^ "Pens add muscle with Reaves". Pittsburgh Penguins. June 23, 2017. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  18. ^ "Penguins Acquire Derick Brassard in Three-Team Trade with OTT and VGK". NHL.com. Pittsburgh Penguins. February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018.
  19. ^ Gearty, Alec (May 20, 2018). "Winnipeg native Ryan Reaves embraces jeers, stuns doubters as Golden Knights down Jets". sportingnews.com. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  20. ^ Regan, J. J. (May 29, 2018). "Ryan Reaves' game-tying goal never should have counted". nbcsports.com. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  21. ^ "Vegas Golden Knights Sign Forward Ryan Reaves". NHL.com. July 1, 2018. Retrieved July 2, 2018.
  22. ^ "VGK Sign Forward Ryan Reaves To Two-Year Contract Extension". Vegas Golden Knights. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  23. ^ "NHL suspends Vegas Golden Knights forward Ryan Reaves for two games after match penalty". ESPN.com. May 31, 2021. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  24. ^ "Rangers Acquire Forward Ryan Reaves". NHL.com. July 29, 2021. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  25. ^ "Rangers Agree to Terms with Ryan Reaves on a One-year Contract Extension". NHL.com. July 31, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  26. ^ "Wild acquires Ryan Reaves from Rangers". Minnesota Wild. November 23, 2022. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  27. ^ Simmons, Steve (June 24, 2017). "Penguins now have enforcer on its bench". Toronto Sun. Chicago. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  28. ^ Traikos, Michael (October 3, 2017). "Fighting in the NHL is making a late-round comeback — because today's enforcers can actually play". The National Post. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  29. ^ "Blues' Reaves suspended three games". February 24, 2016.
  30. ^ "Reaves suspended one game for actions in Golden Knights game". NHL. September 5, 2020.
  31. ^ "Beleskey a Windsorite in birth certificate only". Windsor Star. October 12, 2010. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  32. ^ Odeven, Edward. "Reaves doesn't shy away from limelight". azdailysun.com. Arizona Daily Sun. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  33. ^ MacKey, Jason (September 27, 2017). "Ryan Reaves wouldn't visit White House if he had the choice". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  34. ^ "Reaves putting Kane feud aside, joining him for 'much bigger cause'".

External links[edit]