Ryoko Yamagishi

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Ryoko Yamagishi
山岸 凉子
Born 1947 (age 68–69)
Hokkaidō, Japan
Nationality Japanese
Area(s) manga artist
Notable works
Hi Izuru Tokoro no Tenshi
Terpsichora
Notable collaborations
Year 24 Group
Awards 1983 Kodansha Manga Award in shōjo manga
Grand Prize, 11th Annual Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize

Ryoko Yamagishi (山岸 凉子 Yamagishi Ryōko?, born 1947 in Hokkaidō) is a female Japanese manga artist. She is one of the Year 24 Group.[1][2] Her major works include Hi Izuru Tokoro no Tenshi and Terpsichora, both of which have won manga awards.

Biography[edit]

Yamagishi studied ballet as a child, which plays a part in many of her works. When she read the manga of Machiko Satonaka in 1964, she decided to pursue becoming a manga artist. Although her parents did not agree with this, in 1966 she entered a competition in Shōjo Friend and was a semi-finalist. She applied to Kodansha and sent some short stories to COM. In 1968, after completing her art studies in Hokkaido, she moved to Tokyo and applied for Shuiesha. The next year, she made her debut with "left< And >right " レフトアンドライト, a short story which ran in Ribon.

In 1971, she released the manga series Shiroi Heya no Futari and is the story of a romance between two girls at a prestigious all-girls school in France. It was first published by Shueisha in Ribon, and was regarded as one of the earliest shōjo yuri manga,[3]

In 1983, she won the Kodansha Manga Award for shōjo manga for Hi Izuru Tokoro no Tenshi.[4]

She worked on Terpsichora (The Dancing Girl; Maihime Τερψιχόρα) which was nominated for the 9th annual Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize in 2005,[5] and won the 11th annual Tezuka prize in 2007.[6]

Her works normally have occult themes, although her most popular are Arabesque, about Russian ballet, and Hi Izuru Tokoro no Tenshi.[7] According to Yoshihiro Yonezawa, Yamagishi's style is influenced by Art Nouveau.[8]

Works[edit]

Title Year Notes Refs[9]
Shiroi Heya no Futari 1971 Serialized in Ribon magazine
Published by Shueisha in 1 volume
[3]
Arabesque (アラベスク Arabesuku?) 1975–76 Serialized in Ribon Mascot
Published in 8 volumes
[10]
Hi Izuru Tokoro no Tenshi 1980–84 Serialized in LaLa magazine
Published by Hakusensha in 11 volumes
[11][12][10]
KAgami yo Kagami (鏡よ鏡?, Mirror Mirror) Serialized in You Comics
Published in 1 volume
[10]
Black Swan (黒鳥?) 1995 Serialized in Hankusensha Ladies Comics
Published in 1 volume
[10]
Fuuin (封印?, Seal) 1985 Serialized in Hana to Yume
Published in 2 volumes
[10]
Oni (?, Demon) 1997 Published by Ushio Shuppansha 1 volume [10]
Mede~yūsa (メデュウサ?, Medusa) 1991 Published by Asahi Sonorama, 1 volume [10]
Yo-u-sei-Ou (妖精王?, Fairy King) 1977–78 Serialized in Hana to Yume, 5 volumes [10]
Oshiire (The Closet) 1998 Serialized in Amie, 1 volume [10]
Metamorphose Den (メタモルフォセ伝?, Metamorphose Legend) 1976 Serialized in Hana to Yume, 2 volumes [10]
Terpsichora 2001–07 Published by Media Factory in 10 volumes [13][14][15]
Terpsichora Pt. 2 2008–present Published by Media Factory in 4 volumes [16][17]
Phaethon 1988 [citation needed]
Soyokaze (そよ風?, Breeze)
Neji no sakebi (ねじの叫び?, Cry of the Screw)
Harō! Eburibadi (ハロー!エブリボディ?, Hello Everybody)
Bōifurendo seiza uranai (ボーイフレンド星座占い?, Boyfriend horoscopes)
Dōngno lǚ (冬の旅?, Winterrise)
Sanshokusumire (三色すみれ?, Pansy)
Girisha shinwa no yōsei-tachi (ギリシャ神話の妖精たち?, Fairies of Greek Mythology)
Hī na no maisō (ひいなの埋葬?, Burial of Chicks)
Metamorufoshisuden (メタモルフォシス伝?, Metamorphosis Den)
Panyukisu (パニュキス?)
Seirēn (セイレーン?, Siren)
Pu pe shimōnu (プぺ・シモーヌ?, Pupe Simone)
Kuro no herene (黒のヘレネ―?, Black Helen)
Ame to kosumosu (雨とコスモス?, Rain and Cosmos)


References[edit]

  1. ^ Thorn, Matt (2001). "Shôjo Manga—Something for the Girls". The Japan Quarterly 48 (3). Retrieved December 16, 2007. 
  2. ^ Thorn, Matt (2005). "A History of Manga". Animerica: Anime & Manga Monthly 4 (2,4, & 6). Retrieved December 16, 2007. 
  3. ^ a b Brown, Rebecca (August 8, 2005). "An Introduction to Yuri Manga and Anime". AfterEllen.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010. 
  4. ^ Joel Hahn. "Kodansha Manga Awards". Comic Book Awards Almanac. Archived from the original on August 16, 2007. Retrieved August 21, 2007. 
  5. ^ "Tezuka Cultural Awards". Anime News Network. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  6. ^ "11th Annual Tezuka Cultural Prize Winners Announced". Retrieved July 3, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Girls' Stuff--Mini Intros". matt-thorn.com. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  8. ^ "God of Comics". google.com. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  9. ^ "著者:山岸凉子" [Search results: Author: Ryoko Yamagishi]. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Japan: Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved February 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Yamagishi Ryouko 山岸凉子". skynet.be. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 
  11. ^ "日出処の天子〈第1巻〉 (1981年) (花とゆめcomics) [古書] (-)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved April 5, 2009. 
  12. ^ "日出処の天子 (第11巻) (花とゆめCOMICS) [新書] (-)" (in Japanese). Amazon.co.jp. Retrieved July 11, 2014. 
  13. ^ "11th Annual Tezuka Cultural Prize Winners Announced". Anime News Network. May 10, 2007. Archived from the original on July 25, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  14. ^ 舞姫テレプシコーラ 1 (in Japanese). Media Factory. Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  15. ^ 舞姫テレプシコーラ 10 (in Japanese). Media Factory. Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  16. ^ テレプシコーラ/舞姫 第2部 ①巻 (in Japanese). Media Factory. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  17. ^ テレプシコーラ/舞姫 第2部 ④巻 (in Japanese). Media Factory. Archived from the original on January 6, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]