Süleyman Hilmi Tunahan

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Süleyman Hilmi Tunahan, (1888 – September 16, 1959), was a 20th-century Islamic scholar born in the small Ottoman village of Ferhatlar, also known as Varatlar and today Delchevo in the Razgrad Province, Bulgaria. Süleyman later became a Sufi Master in the tradition of the Naqshbandi Order.

Biography[edit]

Süleyman's father, Osman, was a hafız ("one who has memorized the whole Qur'an") and a renowned Islamic teacher of his time. Osman had finished his education in Istanbul before becoming a professor at the well-known Satirli Madrasah (theological school attached to a mosque) in Silistre. Süleyman's ancestors include Idris who was appointed by Mehmet II (r. 1451–81) as the "Tuna Khan". The young Süleyman was educated at Silistra Middle School and the Satirli Madrasah. Afterwards he went to Istanbul to finish his studies, enrolling in the Sahn Madrasah where he took lessons from Bafra born Ahmet Hamdi. He graduated in 1916 as valedictorian of his class then enrolled at the Süleymaniye Mosque Madrasah in Medresetü'l-Mütehassisin where he studied the tafsir (commentary on the Quran) and hadith (narrations concerning the words and deeds of the prophet Muhammad). Süleyman graduated again as valedictorian from Medresetü'l-Mütehassisin in 1919 and in the same year graduated from Medresetü'l-Kuzat law school, coming first in exams. On informing his father of this ranking he was told: "I didn't send you to Istanbul to go to hell", reminding him of Muhammad's saying: "Two out of three (unrighteous) judges will go to hell." Süleyman explained that his goal was not to become a judge but to learn both religious and common knowledge. He then began work as an Islamic teacher in Istanbul until its madrasahs were closed whereupon he was assigned to work as an Islamic preacher. For some time he preached Islamic sermons in Istanbul's large Ottoman era Selatin mosques such as Sultan Ahmed, Süleymaniye, Şehzâdebaşı, Yeni Cami and Piyâle Paşa Mosque. While working as an Islamic preacher he also taught Muslim children, first in his own home then in madrasahs after they received government permission to reopen in 1946–1947. Süleyman also started to teach the principles of Islam. Many of his students graduated from the madrasas and received permission from the Diyanet İşleri Başkanlığı (Presidency of Religious Affairs) to work as muftis (officials learned in Islamic law who is in charge of Islamic affairs for a province or district), imams (prayer leaders), muezzins (individuals who call five times a day to announce prayers), Islamic preachers and madrasah teachers.[1]

Süleyman's practice of Islam followed the Hanafi (school of Islamic law), while his firm belief in God stemmed from the Maturidi school of Islam. He was also connected to the Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l Jama'ah. He told his students that: "They should hold tight to the creed of Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l Jama'ah". Süleyman died in Kisikli, Istanbul on September 16, 1959. He is buried in the Karacaahmet cemetery.

Süleyman’s silsila[edit]

His Naqshbandiyyah silsila goes back to Khwaja Shah Ahmed Sā‘īd Fāruqī Mujaddidī.

# Name Buried Birth Death
1 Sayyadna Muhammad the last Prophet Madinah, Saudi Arabia Mon 12 Rabi al-Awwal

(570/571 CE)

12 Rabi al-Awwal 11 AH

(5/6 June 632 CE)

2 Sayyadna Abu Bakr Siddiq Madinah, Saudi Arabia 22 Jumada al-Thani 13 AH

(22 August 634 C.E)

3 Sayyadna Salman al-Farsi Mada'in, Iraq 10 Rajab 33 AH

(4/5 February 654 C.E)

4 Imām Qasim ibn Muhammad ibn Abu Bakr, son of son of (2) Madinah, Saudi Arabia 23 Shaban 24 AH

(22/23 June 645 C.E)

24 Jumada al-Thani 101/106/107 AH
5 Imām Jafar Sadiq, son of granddaughter of (2) Madinah, Saudi Arabia 8 Ramadan 80 AH

(5/6 November 699 C.E)

15 Rajab 148 AH

(6/7 September 765 C.E)

6 Khwaja Bayazid Bastami Bistam, Semnan province, Iran 186 AH

(804 C.E)

15 Shaban 261 AH

(24/25 May 875 C.E)

7 Khwaja Abul-Hassan Kharaqani Kharaqan, near Bistam, Semnan province, Iran 352 AH

(963 C.E)

10 Muharram 425 AH

(5/6 December 1033 C.E)

8 Khwaja Abu Ali Farmadi Toos, Khurasan, Iran 434 AH

(1042/1043 C.E)

4 Rabi al-Awwal 477 or 511 AH

(10 July 1084 / 6 July 1117)

9 Khwaja Abu Yaqub Yusuf Hamadānī Marv, near Mary, Turkmenistan 440 AH

(1048/1049 C.E)

Rajab 535 AH

(Feb/Mar 1141 C.E)

10 Khwaja Abdul Khaliq Ghujdawani Ghajdawan, Bukhara, Uzbekistan 22 Shaban 435 AH

(24/25 March 1044 C.E)

12 Rabi al-Awwal 575 AH

(17/18 August 1179 C.E)

11 Khwaja Arif Reogari Reogar, near Bukhara, Uzbekistan 27 Rajab 551 AH

(15 September 1156 C.E)

1 Shawwal 616 AH

(10/11 December 1219 C.E.)

12 Khwaja Mahmood Anjir-Faghnawi Bukhara, Uzbekistan 18 Shawwal 628 AH

(18/19 August 1231 C.E)

17 Rabi al-Awwal 717 AH

(29/30 May 1317 C.E)

13 Khwaja Azizan Ali Ramitani Khwaarizm, Uzbekistan 591 AH

(1194 C.E)

27 Ramadan 715 or 721 AH

(25/26 December 1315 or 20/21 October 1321)

14 Khwaja Muhammad Baba Samasi Samaas, Bukhara, Uzbekistan 25 Rajab 591 AH

(5/6 July 1195 C.E)

10 Jumada al-Thani 755 AH

(2/3 July 1354 C.E)

15 Khwaja Sayyid Amir Kulal Saukhaar, Bukhara, Uzbekistan 676 AH

(1277/1278 C.E)

Wed 2 Jumada al-Thani 772 AH

(21/22 December 1370 C.E)

16 Khwaja Muhammad Baha'uddin Naqshband Bukhari Qasr-e-Aarifan, Bukhara, Uzbekistan 4 Muharram 718 AH[2]

(8/9 March 1318 C.E)

3 Rabi al-Awwal 791 AH

(2/3 March 1389 C.E)

17 Khwaja Ala'uddin Attar Bukhari, son-in-law of (17) Jafaaniyan, Transoxiana (Uzbekistan) Wed 20 Rajab 804 AH

(23 February 1402 C.E)

18 Khwaja Yaqub Charkhi Gulistan, Dushanbe, Tajkistan 762 AH

(1360/1361 C.E)

5 Safar 851 AH

(21/22 April 1447 C.E)

19 Khwaja Ubaidullah Ahrar Samarkand, Uzbekistan Ramadan 806 AH

(March/April 1404 C.E)

29 Rabi al-Awwal 895 AH

(19/20 February 1490 C.E)

20 Khwaja Muhammad Zahid Wakhshi Wakhsh 14 Shawwal 852 AH

(11/12 December 1448 C.E)

1 Rabi al-Awwal 936 AH

(3/4 November 1529 C.E)

21 Khwaja Durwesh Muhammad, son of sister of (21) Asqarar, Uzbekistan 16 Shawwal 846 AH

(17/18 February 1443 C.E)

19 Muharram 970 AH

(18/19 September 1562 C.E)

22 Khwaja Muhammad Amkanaki, son of (22) Amkana, Bukhara, Uzbekistan 918 AH

(1512/1513 C.E)

22 Shaban 1008 AH

(8/9 March 1600 C.E)

23 Khwaja Muhammad Baqi Billah Berang Delhi, India 5 Dhu al-Hijjah 971 or 972 AH

(14 July 1564 / 3 July 1565)

25 Jumada al-Thani 1012 AH

(29/30 November 1603 C.E)

24 Shaikh Ahmad al-Farūqī al-Sirhindī, Imām Rabbānī Sirhind, India 14 Shawwal 971 AH

(25/26 May 1564 C.E)

28 Safar 1034 AH

(9/10 December 1624 C.E)

25 Imām Khwaja Muhammad Masum Faruqi, 3rd son of (25) Sirhind, India 1007 AH

(1598/1599 C.E)

9 Rabi al-Awwal 1099 AH

(13/14 January 1688 C.E)

26 Khwaja Muhammad Saifuddin Faruqi, son of (26) Sirhind, India 1049 AH

(1639/1640 C.E)

19 or 26 Jumada al-awwal 1096 AH

(April 1685 C.E)

27 Sayyid Nur Muhammad Badayuni Delhi, India 11 Dhu al-Qi'dah 1135AH

(12/13 August 1723 C.E)

28 Shaheed Mirza Mazhar Jan-e-Janaan, Shams-ud-Dīn Habībullāh Delhi, India 11 Ramadan 1111 AH

(2/3 March 1700 C.E)

10 Muharram 1195 AH

(Fri 5 January 1781 C.E)

29 Khwaja Abdullah Dehlavi, alias Shah Ghulam Ali Dehlavi Delhi, India 1156 AH[3]

(1743 C.E)

22 Safar 1240 AH

(15/16 October 1824 C.E)

30 Hāfīz Abu Sā‘īd Fāruqī Mujaddidī Delhi, India 2 Dhu al-Qi'dah 1196 AH

(9/10 October 1782 C.E)

1 Shawwal 1250 AH

(30/31 January 1835 C.E)

31 Khwaja Shah Ahmed Sā‘īd Fāruqī Mujaddidī, son of Hāfīz Abu Sā‘īd Fāruqī Madinah, Saudi Arabia 2 Rabi al-Awwal 1277 AH

(18/19 September 1860 C.E)

32 Khwaja Muhammed Mazhar İş’an Can-ı Cânân, son of Khwaja Ahmed Sā‘īd Fāruqī India 1248 AH

(1832 C.E)

Madina

(1883 C.E)

33 Khwaja Selahüddin İbn-i Mevlana Siracüddin Osh - Kyrgyzstan

(1843 C.E)

Osh - Kyrgyzstan

(13 November 1910, C.E)

34 Süleyman Hilmi Tunahan
(Silsila ended)
Razgrad, Bulgaria 1888

(September 16, 1959 C.E)

References[edit]

External links[edit]