S.C. Beira-Mar

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Beira-Mar
Sport Clube Beira-Mar.png
Full nameSport Clube Beira-Mar
Nickname(s)Auri-negros (Gold-and-Blacks)
Founded1922
GroundEstádio Mário Duarte
Capacity12,000
ChairmanHugo Coelho
ManagerCajó
LeagueAveiro FA First Division
2017–18Aveiro FA First Division, 2nd

Sport Clube Beira-Mar (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈspɔɾ ˈklub(ɨ) ˈbɐjɾɐ ˈmaɾ]) is a Portuguese sports club based in Aveiro, Portugal. Its football team currently plays in the Aveiro FA First Division, holding home games at Estádio Mário Duarte.

Eusébio, António Veloso and António Sousa rank among the most famous Portuguese players to have represented the club. All having been capped for the Portugal national team regularly and played for the biggest clubs in the country, the former two with Benfica and the latter with both Porto and Sporting CP. After becoming a manager, Sousa also coached the team on two separate spells guiding the club to its greatest accomplishment so far, winning the 1999 Taça de Portugal. Beira-Mar is an eclectic sports club featuring also, futsal, basketball, boxing, judo, handball, billiards, athletics and paintball departments.

History[edit]

Eusébio, one of the world's greatest footballers, played for Beira-Mar in the 1976–77 season.

Beira-Mar was founded on 1 January 1922, and first reached the first division 39 years later, only lasting one single season. Until 1980, it would make a few further appearances in the top flight, the longest spell being from 1971 to 1974. In the 1976–77 campaign, former S.L. Benfica and Portugal legend Eusébio signed up to play for the side with the provision of not being included in the squad in any matches against S.L. Benfica, never the less, being near the end of his career, injuries prevented him from being fielded regularly and the campaign ended in relegation.

Returning again to the top flight in 1988, Beira-Mar spent most of the following years in the top division. In 1999, eight years after being runners-up, the club again reached the final and won the Taça de Portugal, against S.C. Campomaiorense – Sporting CP, Benfica and FC Porto and all been eliminated before the round of 16. The team won the match 1–0 thanks to a goal from Ricardo Sousa, son of coach António Sousa, who played for the club during the 1970s. The team would be relegated at season's end.

As the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup was discontinued in 1999, Beira-Mar participated in the 1999–2000 UEFA Cup, losing 1–2 on aggregate to Dutch club Vitesse. In the domestic league, the club finished in second position in the second division and immediately returned to the top flight. On 23 February 2002, Beira-Mar achieved a 3–2 away win against Porto, then managed by a young José Mourinho; it would be his last home defeat for the following decade.[1]

The return of Mário Jardel to Portugal to play for Beira-Mar was one of the biggest news in Portugal football in the summer of 2006, as the 33-year-old and former European Golden Shoe winner signed a one-year contract. The Brazilian scored in his official debut, a 2–2 home draw against Desportivo das Aves, but gradually lost his importance in the team, leaving in the following transfer window to a club in Cyprus. Beira-Mar would eventually be relegated in a campaign which also included the sacking of manager Carlos Carvalhal and his replacement with Spaniard Francisco Soler, after the team signed a cooperation deal with Inverfutbol, a Spanish-based sporting company.[2]

Beira-Mar returned to the first division in 2010 after a three-year absence, having finished the season as champions. In 2013, they were relegated to the second division for finishing bottom in 16th place. While in the second national Liga, SC Beira Mar were demoted in 2015 to the second lowest bottom league of the Aveiro district (Associação de Futebol de Aveiro) in the fifth level overall, despite finishing tenth due to financial difficulties and debt, making the club ineligible to participate in national competitions. [3]

Current squad[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Portugal GK Nuno Lopes
2 Portugal DF Bruno Quintino
3 Portugal DF Nuno Cruz
4 Portugal DF Bruno Lopes
5 Portugal DF Hernâni Tomás
6 Portugal MF Miguel Mortágua
7 Portugal MF João Paulo
8 Portugal FW Manuel Lopes
9 Portugal FW Pirata
10 Portugal MF Jorge Silva
11 Portugal DF Diogo Aidos
12 Portugal GK Samuel Biscaia
13 Portugal FW Óscar Lopes
16 Portugal MF Ricardo Castro
No. Position Player
17 Portugal MF Alex Silva
18 Portugal DF Pedro Moreira
20 Portugal MF João Dias
21 Portugal DF Diogo Catraio
22 Portugal MF Tiago Ramalho
23 Portugal FW Magno Fonseca
24 Portugal GK Diogo Melo
25 Portugal MF Miguel Pangaio
26 Brazil FW Cílio Souza
27 Portugal FW Diogo Zamorano
28 Portugal DF Mané Vieira
29 Portugal FW Bruno Ribeiro
30 Portugal MF Alexis Martins

League and cup history[edit]

Season Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Europe Notes
1961–62 1D 11 26 8 5 13 43 61 21
1965–66 1D 11 26 6 6 14 31 65 18
1966–67 1D 14 26 5 4 17 23 58 14
1971–72 1D 13 30 7 9 14 29 51 23
1972–73 1D 12 30 5 13 12 27 57 23
1973–74 1D 13 30 7 7 16 34 59 21
1975–76 1D 13 30 6 9 15 28 47 21
1976–77 1D 13 30 7 9 14 33 57 23
1978–79 1D 12 30 11 2 17 44 56 24
1979–80 1D 15 30 5 10 15 24 46 20
1988–89 1D 15 38 10 13 15 29 36 33
1989–90 1D 11 34 10 9 15 22 39 29
1990–91 1D 6 38 12 12 14 40 49 36
1991–92 1D 8 34 11 10 13 32 41 32
1992–93 1D 8 34 10 12 12 24 33 32
1993–94 1D 14 34 9 11 14 28 38 29
1994–95 1D 17 34 8 5 21 33 54 21
1998–99 1D 16 34 6 15 13 36 53 33
1999–00 2D 2 34 18 11 5 54 30 65 UC 1st round Promoted
2000–01 1D 8 34 14 7 13 45 49 49
2001–02 1D 11 34 10 9 15 48 56 39
2002–03 1D 13 34 10 9 15 43 50 39
2003–04 1D 11 34 11 8 15 36 45 41
2004–05 1D 18 34 6 12 16 30 56 30 Relegated
2005–06 2D 1 34 18 14 2 45 18 68 Last 128 Promoted
2006–07 1D 18 30 4 11 15 28 55 23 4th round Relegated
2007–08 2D 6 30 10 12 8 30 32 42 6th round
2008–09 2D 12 30 8 11 11 32 32 35 4th round
2009–10 2D 1 30 16 6 8 44 30 54 4th round Promoted
2010–11 1D 13 30 7 12 11 32 36 33 4th round
2011–12 1D 12 30 8 5 17 26 38 29 3rd round
2012–13 1D 16 30 5 8 17 35 55 23 5th round Relegated
2013–14 2D 12 42 14 12 16 45 48 54 5th round
2014–15 2D 10 46 16 15 15 55 48 63 3rd round Demoted

European record[edit]

By qualifying to play in the 1999 edition of UEFA Cup, Beira-Mar became the second team from a second division to appear in the competition, after Bray Wanderers from the Republic of Ireland in 1990.

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
1999–2000 UEFA Cup 1R Netherlands Vitesse 1–2 0–0 1–2

Honours[edit]

National[edit]

Winners (1): 1998–99
Winners (2): 2005–06, 2009–10
Winners (3): 1960–61, 1964–65, 1970–71
Winners (1): 1958–59

Other[edit]

Winners (1): 1964–65
Winners (2): 1928–29, 1937–38
Winners (3): 1948–49, 1955–56, 1958–59
Winners (1): 2017–18

Stadium[edit]

Beira-Mar play home games at Estádio Mário Duarte, which has a 12000-seat capacity. This is the city center stadium that the team need to recover their support.

Notable players[edit]

Note: this list includes players that have played at least 100 league games and/or have reached international status.

Former managers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jose Mourinho's unbeaten home run ends; BBC Sport, 2 April 2011
  2. ^ Beira-Mar: Carvalhal despedido para dar lugar a Paco Soler (Beira-Mar: Carvalhal sacked to make way for Paco Soler); Portal d'Aveiro, 9 January 2007 (in Portuguese)
  3. ^ "Atlético convidado a substituir o Beira-Mar" [Atlético invited to replace Beira-Mar]. ojogo.pt (in Portuguese). 29 June 2015. Archived from the original on 1 July 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.

External links[edit]