S. M. Stirling

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from S.M. Stirling)
Jump to: navigation, search
S. M. Stirling
SM Stirling 2.JPG
Born (1953-09-30) September 30, 1953 (age 62)
Metz, France
Occupation Writer
Nationality American
Period 1980s–present
Genre Science fiction, fantasy, alternate history

Stephen Michael Stirling is a French-born Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. Stirling is probably best known for his Draka series of alternate history novels and his later time travel/alternate history Nantucket series and Emberverse series.

Early life and education[edit]

Stirling was born on September 30, 1953, in Metz, France—then the site of a Royal Canadian Air Force base—to an English mother and Canadian father. He has lived in several countries and currently resides in the United States in New Mexico with his wife Jan.

Stirling, along with Eric Flint, was tuckerized as a Secret Service agent in John Birmingham's alternate history WWII novel Weapons of Choice (2004).


Stirling's novels are generally conflict-driven and often describe military situations and militaristic cultures. In addition to his books' military, adventure and exploration focus, he often describes societies with cultural values significantly different from modern western views. One of his recurring topics is the influence of the culture on an individual's outlook and values, with a emphasis on the idea that most people and societies consider themselves moral.

Stirling frequently explores technological development within the context of many of his novels. The Draka for instance, choose and face a different imperative in their conquest of Africa, and turn earlier to breech-loading firearms and steam power than the rest of the Western World. The stranded islanders of the Nantucket Series try to rebuild their technological base once the island is stranded in 1250 BC, while the survivors of the 'Change' now face a world where electricity, firearms, and internal combustion no longer work.

Stirling also tends to write strong female characters who have prominent roles within the story.[1]

In the past he has frequently collaborated with other authors, including David Drake, Jerry Pournelle, Anne McCaffrey and Raymond E. Feist.



  1. ^ Munger, Kel (June 2, 2009). "6/2/09 Book log". Sacramento News and Review. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 

External links[edit]