SEI Investments Company

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SEI Investments Company
Public
Traded as NASDAQSEIC
S&P 400 Component
Industry Financial Services
Headquarters Flag of the United States.svg Oaks, Pennsylvania
Key people
Alfred West, President & CEO
Total assets $779 billion under management or administration (as of March 31, 2017)
Number of employees
Approximately 3,200 (March 2017)
Website seic.com
SEI headquarters in Oaks, PA.

SEI Investments Company, formerly Simulated Environments Inc, is a financial services company headquartered in Oaks, Pennsylvania, United States. The company describes itself as "a global provider of investment processing, investment management, and investment operations solutions"[1]. SEI provides products and services to institutions, private banks, investment advisors, investment managers, and private clients.[2] SEI manages, advises or administers $779 billion in hedge funds, private equity, mutual funds and other managed assets. This includes $297 billion in assets under management and $478 billion in client assets under administration. [1]

SEI has corporate headquarters in Oaks, Pennsylvania with offices in Toronto, London, Dublin, The Netherlands, Hong Kong, South Africa, and Dubai.[3]

History[edit]

SEI was founded as Simulated Environments Inc in 1968 by its current Chairman and CEO, Alfred P. West, Jr. (also known as Al West). West had created the first computer-simulated training technology for loan officers.[citation needed] In the 1970s SEI developed an automated trust and investment accounting system for bank trust departments. In the 1990s SEI launched a wealth management operating platform for independent, fee-based investment advisors.[citation needed]

In 2012 SEI was sued by investors in connection with the financial crimes committed by Allen Stanford. Stanford had sold investors bogus Certificates of Deposit (CDs) and the investors alleged that SEI, as well as other companies, had promoted and misrepresented the CDs as safe investments without performing appropriate due diligence.[4][5] SEI responded that it merely provided a Stanford affiliate with back office services.[6] As of September 2015 the case was still ongoing.[5]

References[edit]