SKY (universities)

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SKY is an acronym used to refer to the three most prestigious universities in South Korea: Seoul National University, Korea University, and Yonsei University.[1] The term is widely used in South Korea, both in media broadcast and by the universities themselves.[2][3]

In South Korea, admission to one of the SKY universities is widely considered as determining one's career and social status.[4][5] Many of South Korea's most influential politicians, lawyers, physicians, engineers, journalists, professors, and policymakers (bureaucrats) have graduated from one of the SKY universities.

Members[edit]

Institution Type Location Established Academic staff Undergraduate enrollment Postgraduate enrollment Rankings
ARWU World (2018)[6] THE World (2019)[7] QS World (2019)[8] THE Asia (2018)[9] QS Asia (2019)[10]
Seoul National University National Daehak-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 1946 2,101
(2018)[11]
16,511
(2018)[11]
11,591
(2018)[11]
101–150 63 36 9 10
Korea University Private Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 1905 1,432
(2018)[12]
21,080
(2018)[12]
8,691
(2018)[12]
201–300 198 86 24 12
Yonsei University Private Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 1885 1,673
(2018)[13]
18,333
(2018)[13]
11,288
(2018)[13]
301–400 201–250 107 20 17

History[edit]

National recognition[edit]

In 2010, it was reported that 46.3% of high government officials and 50% of CEOs of major financial industries were graduates of SKY universities.[14] Also, over 60% of the students who passed the 2010 Korean Bar examination were graduates of SKY universities.[15] Being admitted in one of these universities typically requires students to be within 1% of the Korean College Scholastic Ability Test (the Korean equivalent to the SAT's) which means that these universities have acceptance rates as low as 2%.

Concerns[edit]

There have been a number of SKY university students who have dropped out of school to protest against South Korea's overheated academic elitism.[16]

In popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Asia Times Online :: Korea News and Korean Business and Economy, Pyongyang News
  2. ^ [1], [2], "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-12-25. Retrieved 2007-10-18.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link), [3], [4][permanent dead link],[5]
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-04-10. Retrieved 2008-04-09.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link), [6], [7], [8] Archived 2008-04-11 at the Wayback Machine, [9] (articles in English)
  4. ^ New York Times, "A Taste of Failure Fuels an Appetite for Success at South Korea’s Cram Schools" [10]
  5. ^ *"Life and death exams in South Korea" by James Card, Asia Times Online, November 30, 2005, retrieved December 18, 2005.
  6. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2018". Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  7. ^ "World University Rankings 2019". Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  8. ^ "QS World University Rankings 2019". Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  9. ^ "Asia University Rankings 2018". Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  10. ^ "QS Asia University Rankings 2019". Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  11. ^ a b c "Facts". Seoul National University. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  12. ^ a b c "About KU". Korea University. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "Yonsei at a Glance". Yonsei University. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  14. ^ http://news.naver.com/main/read.nhn?mode=LSD&mid=sec&sid1=101&oid=013&aid=0002007480
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-01-01. Retrieved 2013-08-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ Kim (김), Gyeong-su (경수) (2011-11-17). 명문대 줄잇는 ‘공개 자퇴’ 왜?. 파이낸셜뉴스 (in Korean). Retrieved 2011-11-20.