Mitoferrin-1

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SLC25A37
Identifiers
Aliases SLC25A37, MFRN, MFRN1, MSC, MSCP, PRO1278, PRO1584, PRO2217, HT015, solute carrier family 25 member 37
External IDs MGI: 1914962 HomoloGene: 74739 GeneCards: SLC25A37
Gene location (Human)
Chromosome 8 (human)
Chr. Chromosome 8 (human)[1]
Chromosome 8 (human)
Genomic location for SLC25A37
Genomic location for SLC25A37
Band 8p21.2 Start 23,528,805 bp[1]
End 23,575,463 bp[1]
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_016612
NM_001317812
NM_001317813
NM_001317814

NM_026331
NM_030054

RefSeq (protein)

NP_001304741
NP_001304742
NP_001304743
NP_057696

NP_080607

Location (UCSC) Chr 8: 23.53 – 23.58 Mb Chr 14: 69.24 – 69.29 Mb
PubMed search [3] [4]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse

Mitoferrin-1 (Mfrn1) is a 38 kDa protein[5] that is encoded by the SLC25A37 gene in humans.[6][7] It is a member of the Mitochondrial carrier (MC) Superfamily, however, its metal cargo makes it distinct from other members of this family. Mfrn1 plays a key role in mitochondrial iron homeostasis as an iron transporter, importing ferrous iron from the intermembrane space of the mitochondria to the mitochondrial matrix for the biosynthesis of heme groups and Fe-S clusters.[8] This process is tightly regulated, given the redox potential of Mitoferrin’s iron cargo. Mfrn1 is paralogous to Mitoferrin-2 (Mfrn2), a 39 kDa protein encoded by the SLC25A28 gene in humans.[5] Mfrn1 is highly expressed in differentiating erythroid cells and in other tissues at low levels, while Mfrn2 is expressed ubiquitously in non-erythroid tissues.[9][5]

Function[edit]

The molecular details of iron trafficking for heme and Iron-sulfur cluster synthesis are still unclear, however, Mitoferrin-1 has been shown to form oligomeric complexes with the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB10 and Ferrochelatase (or protoporphyrin ferrochelatase).[10] Furthermore, ABC10 binding enhances the stability and functionality of Mfrn1, suggesting that transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms further regulate cellular and mitochondrial iron homeostasis.[11] Recombinant Mfrn1 in vitro has micromolar affinity for the following first-row transition metals: iron (II), manganese (II), cobalt (II), and nickel (II).[12] Mfrn1 iron transport was reconstituted in proteoliposomes, where the protein was also able to transport manganese, cobalt, copper, and zinc, yet it discriminated against nickel, despite the aforementioned affinity.[12] Notably, Mfrn1 appears to transport free iron ions as opposed to any sort of chelated iron complex.[12] Additionally, Mfrn1 selects against divalent alkali ions.[12] Mfrn1 and its paralog Mfrn2 have complementary functionalities, though the precise relationship is still uncertain. For example, heme production is restored by expression of Mfrn2 in cells silenced for Mfrn1 and by ectopic expression of Mfrn1 in nonerythroid cells silenced for Mfrn2, where Mfrn1 accumulates due to an increased protein half-life.[13] In contrast, ectopic expression of Mfrn2 failed to restore heme product in erythroid cells silenced for Mfrn1 because Mfrn2 was unable to accumulate in mitochondria.[14]

Clinical Significance[edit]

Mitoferrin-1 has been implicated in diseases associated with defective iron homeostasis, resulting in iron or porphyrin imbalances.[15] Abnormal Mfrn1 expression, for example, may contribute to Erythropoietic protoporphyria,[16] a porphyrin disease linked to mutations in the Ferrochelatase enzyme.[16] Selective deletion of Mfrn1 in adult mice led to severe anemia rather than porphyria[17] likely because Iron-responsive element-binding protein (specifically IRE-BP1) transcriptionally regulates porphyrin biogenesis, inhibiting it in the absence of Mfrn1.[9] Mfrn1 has also been implicated in depression[18] and Myelin Displastic syndrome.[19]

Animal Studies[edit]

The importance of Mitoferrins in heme and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis was first discovered in the anemic zebrafish mutant frascati.[6] Studies in mice revealed that total deletion of Mfrn1 resulted in embryonic lethality, while selective deletion in adults caused severe anemia as stated above.[20] Expression mouse Mfrn1 rescued knockout zebrafish, indicating that the gene is highly evolutionarily conserved.[21] The transcription factor, GATA-1, directly regulates Mfrn1 expression in zebrafish via distal cis-regulatory Mfrn1 elements.[22] In C. elegans, reduced Mfrn1 expression results in abnormal development and increased lifespans of roughly 50-80%.[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000147454 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ a b c GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000034248 - Ensembl, May 2017
  3. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  4. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  5. ^ a b c Hung HI, Schwartz JM, Maldonado EN, Lemasters JJ, Nieminen AL (January 2013). "Mitoferrin-2-dependent mitochondrial iron uptake sensitizes human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells to photodynamic therapy". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 288 (1): 677–86. doi:10.1074/jbc.M112.422667. PMC 3537066Freely accessible. PMID 23135267. 
  6. ^ a b Shaw GC, Cope JJ, Li L, Corson K, Hersey C, Ackermann GE, Gwynn B, Lambert AJ, Wingert RA, Traver D, Trede NS, Barut BA, Zhou Y, Minet E, Donovan A, Brownlie A, Balzan R, Weiss MJ, Peters LL, Kaplan J, Zon LI, Paw BH (March 2006). "Mitoferrin is essential for erythroid iron assimilation". Nature. 440 (7080): 96–100. doi:10.1038/nature04512. PMID 16511496. 
  7. ^ "Entrez Gene: SLC25A37 solute carrier family 25, member 37". 
  8. ^ Hentze MW, Muckenthaler MU, Galy B, Camaschella C (July 2010). "Two to tango: regulation of Mammalian iron metabolism". Cell. 142 (1): 24–38. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2010.06.028. PMID 20603012. 
  9. ^ a b Chung J, Anderson SA, Gwynn B, Deck KM, Chen MJ, Langer NB, Shaw GC, Huston NC, Boyer LF, Datta S, Paradkar PN, Li L, Wei Z, Lambert AJ, Sahr K, Wittig JG, Chen W, Lu W, Galy B, Schlaeger TM, Hentze MW, Ward DM, Kaplan J, Eisenstein RS, Peters LL, Paw BH (March 2014). "Iron regulatory protein-1 protects against mitoferrin-1-deficient porphyria". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 289 (11): 7835–43. doi:10.1074/jbc.M114.547778. PMID 24509859. 
  10. ^ Chen W, Dailey HA, Paw BH (July 2010). "Ferrochelatase forms an oligomeric complex with mitoferrin-1 and Abcb10 for erythroid heme biosynthesis". Blood. 116 (4): 628–30. doi:10.1182/blood-2009-12-259614. PMID 20427704. 
  11. ^ Chen W, Paradkar PN, Li L, Pierce EL, Langer NB, Takahashi-Makise N, Hyde BB, Shirihai OS, Ward DM, Kaplan J, Paw BH (September 2009). "Abcb10 physically interacts with mitoferrin-1 (Slc25a37) to enhance its stability and function in the erythroid mitochondria". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 106 (38): 16263–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.0904519106. PMID 19805291. 
  12. ^ a b c d Christenson ET, Gallegos AS, Banerjee A (March 2018). "In vitro reconstitution, functional dissection, and mutational analysis of metal ion transport by mitoferrin-1". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 293 (10): 3819–3828. doi:10.1074/jbc.M117.817478. PMID 29305420. 
  13. ^ Paradkar PN, Zumbrennen KB, Paw BH, Ward DM, Kaplan J (February 2009). "Regulation of mitochondrial iron import through differential turnover of mitoferrin 1 and mitoferrin 2". Molecular and Cellular Biology. 29 (4): 1007–16. doi:10.1128/MCB.01685-08. PMID 19075006. 
  14. ^ Paradkar PN, Zumbrennen KB, Paw BH, Ward DM, Kaplan J (February 2009). "Regulation of mitochondrial iron import through differential turnover of mitoferrin 1 and mitoferrin 2". Molecular and Cellular Biology. 29 (4): 1007–16. doi:10.1128/MCB.01685-08. PMID 19075006. 
  15. ^ Shaw GC, Cope JJ, Li L, Corson K, Hersey C, Ackermann GE, Gwynn B, Lambert AJ, Wingert RA, Traver D, Trede NS, Barut BA, Zhou Y, Minet E, Donovan A, Brownlie A, Balzan R, Weiss MJ, Peters LL, Kaplan J, Zon LI, Paw BH (March 2006). "Mitoferrin is essential for erythroid iron assimilation". Nature. 440 (7080): 96–100. doi:10.1038/nature04512. PMID 16511496. 
  16. ^ a b Wang Y, Langer NB, Shaw GC, Yang G, Li L, Kaplan J, Paw BH, Bloomer JR (July 2011). "Abnormal mitoferrin-1 expression in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria". Experimental Hematology. 39 (7): 784–94. doi:10.1016/j.exphem.2011.05.003. PMID 21627978. 
  17. ^ Troadec MB, Warner D, Wallace J, Thomas K, Spangrude GJ, Phillips J, Khalimonchuk O, Paw BH, Ward DM, Kaplan J (May 2011). "Targeted deletion of the mouse Mitoferrin1 gene: from anemia to protoporphyria". Blood. 117 (20): 5494–502. doi:10.1182/blood-2010-11-319483. PMID 21310927. 
  18. ^ Huo YX, Huang L, Zhang DF, Yao YG, Fang YR, Zhang C, Luo XJ (December 2016). "Identification of SLC25A37 as a major depressive disorder risk gene". Journal of Psychiatric Research. 83: 168–175. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2016.09.011. PMID 27643475. 
  19. ^ Visconte V, Avishai N, Mahfouz R, Tabarroki A, Cowen J, Sharghi-Moshtaghin R, Hitomi M, Rogers HJ, Hasrouni E, Phillips J, Sekeres MA, Heuer AH, Saunthararajah Y, Barnard J, Tiu RV (January 2015). "Distinct iron architecture in SF3B1-mutant myelodysplastic syndrome patients is linked to an SLC25A37 splice variant with a retained intron". Leukemia. 29 (1): 188–95. doi:10.1038/leu.2014.170. PMID 24854990. 
  20. ^ Troadec MB, Warner D, Wallace J, Thomas K, Spangrude GJ, Phillips J, Khalimonchuk O, Paw BH, Ward DM, Kaplan J (May 2011). "Targeted deletion of the mouse Mitoferrin1 gene: from anemia to protoporphyria". Blood. 117 (20): 5494–502. doi:10.1182/blood-2010-11-319483. PMID 21310927. 
  21. ^ Shaw GC, Cope JJ, Li L, Corson K, Hersey C, Ackermann GE, Gwynn B, Lambert AJ, Wingert RA, Traver D, Trede NS, Barut BA, Zhou Y, Minet E, Donovan A, Brownlie A, Balzan R, Weiss MJ, Peters LL, Kaplan J, Zon LI, Paw BH (March 2006). "Mitoferrin is essential for erythroid iron assimilation". Nature. 440 (7080): 96–100. doi:10.1038/nature04512. PMID 16511496. 
  22. ^ Amigo JD, Yu M, Troadec MB, Gwynn B, Cooney JD, Lambert AJ, Chi NC, Weiss MJ, Peters LL, Kaplan J, Cantor AB, Paw BH (April 2011). "Identification of distal cis-regulatory elements at mouse mitoferrin loci using zebrafish transgenesis". Molecular and Cellular Biology. 31 (7): 1344–56. doi:10.1128/MCB.01010-10. PMID 21248200. 
  23. ^ Ren Y, Yang S, Tan G, Ye W, Liu D, Qian X, Ding Z, Zhong Y, Zhang J, Jiang D, Zhao Y, Lu J (January 11, 2018). "Reduction of mitoferrin results in abnormal development and extended lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans". PLOS One. 7 (1): e29666. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029666. PMID 22253756. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Maruyama K, Sugano S (January 1994). "Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides". Gene. 138 (1-2): 171–4. doi:10.1016/0378-1119(94)90802-8. PMID 8125298. 
  • Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K, Suyama A, Sugano S (October 1997). "Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library". Gene. 200 (1-2): 149–56. doi:10.1016/S0378-1119(97)00411-3. PMID 9373149. 
  • Hu RM, Han ZG, Song HD, Peng YD, Huang QH, Ren SX, Gu YJ, Huang CH, Li YB, Jiang CL, Fu G, Zhang QH, Gu BW, Dai M, Mao YF, Gao GF, Rong R, Ye M, Zhou J, Xu SH, Gu J, Shi JX, Jin WR, Zhang CK, Wu TM, Huang GY, Chen Z, Chen MD, Chen JL (August 2000). "Gene expression profiling in the human hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and full-length cDNA cloning". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 97 (17): 9543–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.160270997. PMC 16901Freely accessible. PMID 10931946. 
  • Li QZ, Eckenrode S, Ruan QG, Wang CY, Shi JD, McIndoe RA, She JX (November 2001). "Rapid decrease of RNA level of a novel mouse mitochondria solute carrier protein (Mscp) gene at 4-5 weeks of age". Mammalian Genome. 12 (11): 830–6. doi:10.1007/s00335001-2075-1. PMID 11845285. 
  • Otsuki T, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Hayashi K, Suzuki Y, Yamamoto J, Wakamatsu A, Kimura K, Sakamoto K, Hatano N, Kawai Y, Ishii S, Saito K, Kojima S, Sugiyama T, Ono T, Okano K, Yoshikawa Y, Aotsuka S, Sasaki N, Hattori A, Okumura K, Nagai K, Sugano S, Isogai T (2007). "Signal sequence and keyword trap in silico for selection of full-length human cDNAs encoding secretion or membrane proteins from oligo-capped cDNA libraries". DNA Research. 12 (2): 117–26. doi:10.1093/dnares/12.2.117. PMID 16303743. 

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.