SMS gateway: Difference between revisions

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==Email to SMS / Web to SMS==
 
==Email to SMS / Web to SMS==
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Email can be sent to many cell phone providers using the phone number and then an @provider.com suffix.<ref>[http://www.livejournal.com/tools/textmessage.bml?mode=details List of Cell Phone Providers SMS emails]</ref>
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== Skype to SMS ==
 
== Skype to SMS ==
 
The Skype client (from V2.5 onwards) provides Skype SMS access. Skype users can send SMS messages to cellphones/mobiles (and land-line phones, where available) which are debited to their [[SkypeOut]] account. The Skype client logs a receipt confirming that the SMS has been received<ref>Skype User Guide & FAQ: ''[http://www.HL7.com.au/Skype.htm#SMS Use the Skype SMS Function:]'', 19 Sept. 2007</ref>.
 
The Skype client (from V2.5 onwards) provides Skype SMS access. Skype users can send SMS messages to cellphones/mobiles (and land-line phones, where available) which are debited to their [[SkypeOut]] account. The Skype client logs a receipt confirming that the SMS has been received<ref>Skype User Guide & FAQ: ''[http://www.HL7.com.au/Skype.htm#SMS Use the Skype SMS Function:]'', 19 Sept. 2007</ref>.

Revision as of 16:45, 15 March 2008

An SMS gateway is a service providing an interface between SMS messages and other protocols.

Some SMS gateway providers can be classified as aggregators or SS7 providers. The aggregator model is based on multiple agreements with mobile carriers to exchange 2-way SMS traffic into and out of the operator’s Short Message Service Centre (SMS-C), also known as 'local termination model'[citation needed]. Aggregators lack direct access into the SS7 protocol, which is the protocol where the SMS messages are exchanged. These providers have no visibility and control over the message delivery, being unable to offer delivery guarantees. SMS messages are delivered in the operator’s SMS-C, but not the subscriber’s handset.

Another type of SMS gateway provider is based on SS7 connectivity to route SMS messages, also known as 'international termination model'[citation needed]. The advantage of this model is the ability to route data directly through SS7, which gives the provider total control and visibility of the complete path during the SMS routing. This means SMS messages can be sent directly to and from recipients without having to go through the SMS-C of other mobile operators. Therefore, it’s possible to avoid delays and message losses, offering full delivery guarantees of messages and optimized routing.

The University of Duisburg-Essen, in partnership with mobile messaging provider Tyntec, have developed the study for SMS messaging to enable the detailed monitoring of SMS transmissions to ensure a greater degree of reliability and a higher average speed of delivery.[1] The new parameters can be used by mobile network operators, third party SMS gateways and mobile network infrastructure software vendors to monitor the transmission of SMS messages and to detect network transmission problems quickly and accurately.

Landline phone

These services allow cellphone users to send SMS messages to landline phone numbers just as they would to other cellphones. With a representative service, after the customer has sent off the SMS message to the landline number, the recipient's phone rings with the caller ID of the sender's cellphone. When they pick up, an automated voice reads the text message and allows for a response via a voicemail or via one of a few canned text messages.

Several operators have true fixed-wire SMS services. These are based on extensions to the ETSI GSM SMS standards and allow fixed-fixed, fixed-mobile and mobile-fixed messaging. These use Frequency-shift keying to transfer the message between the terminal and the SMSC. Terminals are usually DECT-based, but wired handsets and wired text-only (no voice) devices exist. Messages are received by the terminal recognising that the CLI is that of the SMSC and going off-hook silently to receive the message.

IP SMS Gateways

For high volume SMS traffic IP SMS gateways can be used. These gateways connect directly to the Short Message Service Center (SMSC) of the SMS service providers using one of the following protocols: SMPP, UCP/EMI, CIMD2. Most IP SMS gateways provide various API's that allow software developers to send and receive large number of messages.

Home automation systems

Some Home Automation systems have the ability to accept SMS messages from the users' mobile phones to control lighting and other appliances. The system may send an SMS confirmation when the requested action has been performed.

Mobile 'hub' to SMS

Some products exist which allow messages to be sent via pre-installed software (via a PC or laptop) and an attached GSM device.This plug-and-play software was recently used to great effect as a monitoring tool during the Nigerian elections,[2] and also won the WSIS "ICT Success Story of the Month" for April 2007.[3]

SMS to Email

This type of service allows people who do have a cell phone, but do not have a computer, to send email via SMS.

Email to SMS / Web to SMS

Email can be sent to many cell phone providers using the phone number and then an @provider.com suffix.[4]

Skype to SMS

The Skype client (from V2.5 onwards) provides Skype SMS access. Skype users can send SMS messages to cellphones/mobiles (and land-line phones, where available) which are debited to their SkypeOut account. The Skype client logs a receipt confirming that the SMS has been received[5].

SMS gateway appliances

A gateway appliance is a local device which communicates with a gateway, equivalent to a Mail transfer agent.

See also

References