SM U-109

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For other ships with the same name, see German submarine U-109.
History
German Empire
Name: U-109
Ordered: 5 May 1916
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Yard number: 278
Launched: 25 September 1917
Commissioned: 7 November 1917
Fate: Sunk 26 January 1918
General characteristics [1]
Class and type: German Type U 93 submarine
Displacement:
  • 798 t (785 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,000 t (980 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.30 m (20 ft 8 in) (o/a)
  • 4.15 m (13 ft 7 in) (pressure hull)
Height: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in)
Draught: 3.90 m (12 ft 10 in)
Installed power:
  • 2 × 2,400 PS (1,765 kW; 2,367 shp) surfaced
  • 2 × 1,200 PS (883 kW; 1,184 shp) submerged
Propulsion: 2 shafts, 2 × 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) propellers
Speed:
  • 16.4 knots (30.4 km/h; 18.9 mph) surfaced
  • 8.4 knots (15.6 km/h; 9.7 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 9,280 nmi (17,190 km; 10,680 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (164 ft 1 in)
Complement: 4 officers, 32 enlisted
Armament:
  • 6 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (four bow, two stern)
  • 12-16 torpedoes
  • 1 × 10.5 cm (4.1 in) deck gun
  • 1 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) deck gun
Service record
Part of:
  • IV Flotilla
  • unknown start – 26 January 1918
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Otto Ney[2]
  • 7 November 1917 – 26 January 1918
Operations: 1 patrol
Victories: None

SM U-109[Note 1] was a Type U 93 submarine of the Imperial German Navy in World War I, taking part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.[3] The building contract was confirmed 5 May 1916, and was awarded to Germaniawerft, Kiel.[4] A Type 93 boat, she was launched 25 September 1917 and commissioned 7 November. She was under the command of Otto Ney. On 28 January 1918, she was sunk in the English Channel, possibly by a mine, while diving to avoid ships from the Dover Patrol (particularly drifter H.M. Beryl III).[5] She sank no ships.[3][6][7]

Design[edit]

German Type U 93 submarines were preceded by the shorter Type U 87 submarines. U-109 had a displacement of 798 tonnes (785 long tons) when at the surface and 1,000 tonnes (980 long tons) while submerged.[1] She had a total length of 71.55 m (234 ft 9 in), a pressure hull length of 56.05 m (183 ft 11 in), a beam of 6.30 m (20 ft 8 in), a height of 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in), and a draught of 3.90 m (12 ft 10 in). The submarine was powered by two 2,400 metric horsepower (1,800 kW; 2,400 shp) engines for use while surfaced, and two 1,200 metric horsepower (880 kW; 1,200 shp) engines for use while submerged. She had two propeller shafts and two 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) propellers. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[1]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 16.4 knots (30.4 km/h; 18.9 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 8.4 knots (15.6 km/h; 9.7 mph).[1] When submerged, she could operate for 50 nautical miles (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 9,280 nautical miles (17,190 km; 10,680 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph). U-109 was fitted with six 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (four at the bow and two at the stern), twelve to sixteen torpedoes, one 10.5 centimetres (4.1 in) deck gun, and one 8.8 centimetres (3.5 in) deck gun. She had a complement of thirty-six (thirty-two crew members and four officers).[1]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Gröner 1991, pp. 12-14.
  2. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Otto Ney". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: U 109". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 25 January 2010. 
  4. ^ Rössler, Eberhard, The U-boat: The evolution and technical history of German Submarines, Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland, 1989, p. 66
  5. ^ Innes McCartney (2002). Lost Patrols: Submarine Wrecks of the English Channel. 
  6. ^ Gray, Edwyn A., The U-Boat War 1914-1918, Leo Cooper, London, 1994 p. 242
  7. ^ *Innes McCartney (2002). Lost Patrols: Submarine Wrecks of the English Channel. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 

Coordinates: 50°53′N 1°31′E / 50.883°N 1.517°E / 50.883; 1.517