SM U-75

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History
German Empire
Name: U-75
Ordered: 9 March 1915
Builder: AG Vulkan, Hamburg
Yard number: 57
Launched: 30 January 1916
Commissioned: 26 March 1916
Fate: 13 December 1917 - Struck a mine off Terschelling. 23 dead, unknown number of survivors.[1]
General characteristics [2]
Class and type: German Type UE I submarine
Displacement:
  • 755 t (743 long tons) surfaced
  • 832 t (819 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 5.90 m (19 ft 4 in) (o/a)
  • 5.00 m (16 ft 5 in) (pressure hull)
Height: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in)
Draught: 4.86 m (15 ft 11 in)
Installed power:
  • 2 × 900 PS (662 kW; 888 shp) surfaced
  • 2 × 800 PS (588 kW; 789 shp) submerged
Propulsion: 2 shafts, 2× 1.38 m (4 ft 6 in) propellers
Speed:
  • 9.9 knots (18.3 km/h; 11.4 mph) surfaced
  • 7.9 knots (14.6 km/h; 9.1 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 7,880 nmi (14,590 km; 9,070 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced
  • 83 nmi (154 km; 96 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 28 enlisted
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Curt Beitzen[3]
  • 26 March 1916 – 1 May 1917
  • Kptlt. Fritz Schmolling[4]
  • 2 May – 13 December 1917
Operations: 7 patrols
Victories:
  • 11 ships sunk 18,347 GRT
  • 2 ships damaged 4,192 GRT
  • 1 merchant ship taken as prize 1,700 GRT
  • 1 warship sunk 10,850 GRT.[1]

SM U-75 was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. U-75 was engaged in naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic. On her first mission, U-75 laid the mine that sank the cruiser HMS Hampshire during her voyage to Russia carrying British Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener. The cruiser sank at 59°07′N 03°24′W / 59.117°N 3.400°W / 59.117; -3.400 west of the Orkney Islands with heavy loss of life in a force 9 gale.

Design[edit]

German Type UE I submarines were preceded by the longer Type U 66 submarines. U-75 had a displacement of 755 tonnes (743 long tons) when at the surface and 832 tonnes (819 long tons) while submerged.[2] She had a total length of 56.80 m (186 ft 4 in), a pressure hull length of 46.66 m (153 ft 1 in), a beam of 5.90 m (19 ft 4 in), a height of 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in), and a draught of 4.86 m (15 ft 11 in). The submarine was powered by two 900 metric horsepower (660 kW; 890 shp) engines for use while surfaced, and two 800 metric horsepower (590 kW; 790 shp) engines for use while submerged. She had two propeller shafts. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 9.9 knots (18.3 km/h; 11.4 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 7.9 knots (14.6 km/h; 9.1 mph).[2] When submerged, she could operate for 83 nautical miles (154 km; 96 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 7,880 nautical miles (14,590 km; 9,070 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph). U-75 was fitted with two 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (one at the port bow and one starboard stern), four torpedoes, and one 8.8 cm (3.5 in) SK L/30 deck gun. She had a complement of thirty-two (twenty-eight crew members and four officers).[2]

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 1] Fate[5]
5 June 1916 HMS Hampshire  Royal Navy 10,850 Sunk
22 June 1916 HMD Laurel Crown  Royal Navy 81 Sunk
7 August 1916 HMT John High  Royal Navy 228 Sunk
12 August 1916 Kovda  Russian Empire 1,125 Sunk
20 September 1916 Etton  United Kingdom 2,831 Sunk
16 November 1916 Fenja  Denmark 433 Sunk
22 November 1916 Reserv  Sweden 1,700 Captured as a prize
23 November 1916 Arthur  Sweden 1,435 Sunk
9 April 1917 Ganslei  Russian Empire 1,273 Sunk
15 April 1917 HMT Arctic Prince  Royal Navy 194 Damaged
10 August 1917 Solglimt  Norway 1,037 Sunk
16 August 1917 Palatine  United Kingdom 2,110 Sunk
3 September 1917 Treverbyn  United Kingdom 4,163 Sunk
22 November 1917 King Idwal  United Kingdom 3,631 Sunk
10 December 1917 Aureole  United Kingdom 3,998 Damaged

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Merchant ship tonnages are in gross register tons. Military vessels are listed by tons displacement.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: U 75". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gröner 1991, pp. 10-11.
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Curt Beitzen". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Fritz Schmolling". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U 75". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 18 January 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.