SM UB-36

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SM UB 45.jpg
SM UB-45 a u-boat similar to UB-36
History
German Empire
Name: UB-36
Ordered: 22 July 1915[1]
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg[1]
Cost: 1,152,000 German Papiermark[2]
Yard number: 260[3]
Launched: 15 January 1916[3]
Completed: 22 May 1916[3]
Commissioned: 22 May 1916[2]
Fate: Sunk May 1917
General characteristics [2]
Class and type: German Type UB II submarine
Displacement:
  • 274 t (270 long tons) surfaced
  • 303 t (298 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 3.85 m (12 ft 8 in) pressure hull
Draught: 3.69 m (12 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) surfaced
  • 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 6,450 nmi (11,950 km; 7,420 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) surfaced
  • 45 nmi (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 2 officers, 21 men
Armament:
Notes: 42-second diving time
Service record
Part of:
  • Imperial German Navy:
  • Baltic Flotilla
  • 26 June 1916 – 23 February 1917
  • Flandern Flotilla
  • 23 February – 9 May 1917
Commanders:
  • Oblt.z.S. Kurt Albrecht[4]
  • 22 May – 12 December 1916
  • Oblt.z.S. Harald von Keyserlingk[5]
  • 13 December 1916 – 9 May 1917
Operations: 12 patrols
Victories:
  • 7 merchant ships sunk (1,584 GRT)
  • 2 merchant ships taken as prizes (917 GRT)

SM UB-36[Note 1] was a German Type UB II submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 22 July 1915 and launched on 15 January 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 22 May 1916 as SM UB-36.

The submarine sank seven ships in twelve patrols. She herself was sunk in May 1917, but her fate is a matter of dispute. Some sources claim that UB-36 was rammed and presumably sunk by the French steamer SS Molière in the English Channel off Ushant, France, on 21 May 1917.[6] Other sources states that this in fact was SM UC-36 and that UB-36 struck a mine and sank elsewhere.[7]

Design[edit]

A German Type UB II submarine, UB-36 had a displacement of 274 tonnes (270 long tons) when at the surface and 303 tonnes (298 long tons) while submerged. She had a total length of 36.90 m (121 ft 1 in), a beam of 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in), and a draught of 3.69 m (12 ft 1 in). The submarine was powered by two Körting six-cylinder diesel engines producing a total 284 metric horsepower (280 shp; 209 kW), two Siemens-Schuckert electric motors producing 280 metric horsepower (210 kW; 280 shp), and one propeller shaft. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph). When submerged, she could operate for 45 nautical miles (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 6,450 nautical miles (11,950 km; 7,420 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph). UB-36 was fitted with two 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes, four torpedoes, and one 8.8 cm (3.5 in) Uk L/30 deck gun. She had a complement of twenty-one crew members and two officers and a 42-second dive time.[2]

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[8]
30 July 1916 Anna  Sweden 172 Sunk
30 July 1916 Pitea  Sweden 644 Captured as a prize
1 August 1916 Hudiksvall  Sweden 481 Sunk
1 August 1916 Pehr Brahe  Finland 499 Sunk
18 March 1917 Avance  Norway 273 Captured as a prize
1 April 1917 Jolie Brise  France 18 Sunk
1 April 1917 Providence De Dieu  France 15 Sunk
16 April 1917 Marden  United Kingdom 297 Sunk
16 April 1917 Rochester Castle  United Kingdom 102 Sunk

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. ^ Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rössler 1979, p. 64.
  2. ^ a b c d e Gröner 1991, pp. 23-25.
  3. ^ a b c Rössler 1979, p. 65.
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Kurt Albrecht". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Harald von Keyserlingk". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  6. ^ Bendert 2000, p. 101.
  7. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UB 36". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. 
  8. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by UB-36". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bendert, Harald (2000). Die UB-Boote der Kaiserlichen Marine, 1914-1918. Einsätze, Erfolge, Schicksal (in German). Hamburg: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn GmbH. ISBN 3-8132-0713-7. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 
  • Rössler, Eberhard (1979). U-Bootbau bis Ende des 1. Weltkrieges, Konstruktionen für das Ausland und die Jahre 1935 – 1945. Die deutschen U-Boote und ihre Werften (in German). I. Munich: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-5213-7. 

External links[edit]

  • Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UB 36". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 21 February 2009. 

Coordinates: 48°42′N 5°14′W / 48.700°N 5.233°W / 48.700; -5.233