SM UC-74

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For other ships with the same name, see German submarine U-74.
History
German Empire
Name: UC-74
Ordered: 12 January 1916[1]
Builder: AG Vulcan, Hamburg[2]
Yard number: 79[1]
Launched: 19 October 1916[1]
Commissioned: 26 November 1916[1]
Fate: interned at Barcelona, 21 November 1918; surrendered to France, March 1919; broken up in Toulon, July 1921[1]
General characteristics [3]
Class and type: German Type UC II submarine
Displacement:
  • 410 t (400 long tons), surfaced
  • 493 t (485 long tons), submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 5.22 m (17 ft 2 in) o/a
  • 3.65 m (12 ft) pressure hull
Draught: 3.65 m (12 ft 0 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 11.8 knots (21.9 km/h; 13.6 mph), surfaced
  • 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph), submerged
Range:
  • 8,660–10,230 nmi (16,040–18,950 km; 9,970–11,770 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced
  • 52 nmi (96 km; 60 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 26
Armament:
  • 6 × 100 cm (39.4 in) mine tubes
  • 18 × UC 200 mines
  • 3 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 bow/external; one stern)
  • 7 × torpedoes
  • 1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) Uk L/30 deck gun
Notes: 30-second diving time
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Wilhelm Marschall[4]
  • 26 November 1916 – 6 December 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Hans Adalbert von der Lühe[5]
  • 15 February – 6 August 1918
  • Oblt.z.S. Hans Schüler[6]
  • 7 August – 21 November 1918
Operations: 10 patrols
Victories:
  • 37 merchant ships sunk 92,722 GRT
  • 4 ships damaged 13,108 GRT

SM UC-74[Note 1] was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 12 January 1916 and was launched on 19 October 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 26 November 1916 as SM UC-74. In ten patrols UC-74 was credited with sinking 37 ships, either by torpedo or by mines laid. UC-74 was interned at Barcelona on 21 November 1918 when she ran out of fuel. The U-boat was surrendered to France on 26 March 1919 and was broken up at Toulon in July 1921.[1]

Design[edit]

A German Type UC II submarine, UC-74 had a displacement of 410 tonnes (400 long tons) when at the surface and 493 tonnes (485 long tons) while submerged. She had a length overall of 50.45 m (165 ft 6 in), a beam of 5.22 m (17 ft 2 in), and a draught of 3.65 m (12 ft 0 in). The submarine was powered by two six-cylinder four-stroke diesel engines each producing 290–300 metric horsepower (210–220 kW; 290–300 shp) (a total of 580–600 metric horsepower (430–440 kW; 570–590 shp)), two electric motors producing 620 metric horsepower (460 kW; 610 shp), and two propeller shafts. She had a dive time of 30 seconds and was capable of operating at a depth of 50 metres (160 ft).[3]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 11.8 knots (21.9 km/h; 13.6 mph) and a submerged speed of 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph). When submerged, she could operate for 52 nautical miles (96 km; 60 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 8,660 to 10,230 nautical miles (16,040 to 18,950 km; 9,970 to 11,770 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph). UC-74 was fitted with six 100 centimetres (39 in) mine tubes, eighteen UC 200 mines, three 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (one on the stern and two on the bow), seven torpedoes, and one 8.8 centimetres (3.5 in) Uk L/30 deck gun. Her complement was twenty-six crew members.[3]

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[7]
1 March 1917 Durban  Norway 765 Damaged
8 March 1917 Ares  Netherlands 3,783 Sunk
10 March 1917 James Burton Cook  United Kingdom 133 Sunk
15 April 1917 Arcadian  United Kingdom 8,939 Sunk
28 April 1917 Pontiac  United Kingdom 3,345 Sunk
2 May 1917 Alessandria  Kingdom of Italy 8,006 Sunk
29 May 1917 Aghia Tom Aghion  Greece 30 Sunk
29 May 1917 Kirikos  Greece 84 Sunk
29 May 1917 Yarra  France 4,163 Sunk
10 June 1917 Stylianos  Egypt 389 Sunk
11 June 1917 Benha  United Kingdom 1,878 Sunk
19 August 1917 Aghios Georgios  Greece 161 Sunk
24 August 1917 Parana  France 6,248 Sunk
30 August 1917 Athinai  Greece 988 Sunk
31 August 1917 Eleni  Greece 679 Sunk
1 September 1917 Amiral Olry  France 5,567 Sunk
3 September 1917 Agios Andreas  Greece 68 Sunk
6 September 1917 Ville De Strasbourg  France 2,167 Sunk
6 September 1917 Aghios Georgios  Greece 897 Sunk
30 September 1917 Charlsin  United Kingdom 241 Sunk
6 October 1917 Civilian  United Kingdom 7,871 Sunk
11 October 1917 Panormitis  France 59 Sunk
14 October 1917 Semantha  United Kingdom 2,847 Sunk
15 October 1917 White Head  United Kingdom 1,172 Sunk
14 November 1917 Prophet  United Kingdom 3,230 Sunk
25 November 1917 Ovid  United Kingdom 4,159 Sunk
28 November 1917 Jane Radcliffe  United Kingdom 4,074 Sunk
4 March 1918 Clan Graham  United Kingdom 5,213 Damaged
5 March 1918 Roxburgh  United Kingdom 4,630 Sunk
10 March 1918 Chagres  United Kingdom 5,288 Sunk
30 April 1918 Kalliope  United Kingdom 114 Sunk
1 May 1918 Nikolaos  Greece 50 Sunk
5 May 1918 Sayeda  Egypt 18 Sunk
13 May 1918 Loch Naver  United Kingdom 216 Sunk
11 July 1918 Roberto  Spain 910 Sunk
26 July 1918 Monastir  France 1,915 Damaged
23 October 1918 Aghios Gerasimos  Greece 85 Sunk
2 November 1918 Murcia  United Kingdom 4,871 Sunk
2 November 1918 Surada  United Kingdom 5,324 Sunk
4 November 1918 War Roach  United Kingdom 5,215 Damaged
5 November 1918 Stavnos  Kingdom of Italy 38 Sunk

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. ^ Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UC 74". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 23 February 2009. 
  2. ^ Tarrant, p. 173.
  3. ^ a b c Gröner 1991, pp. 31-32.
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Wilhelm Marschall (Pour le Mérite)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 4 March 2015. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Adalbert von der Lühe". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 4 March 2015. 
  6. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Schüler". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 4 March 2015. 
  7. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by UC 74". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 10 December 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]