SPDR S&P 500 Trust ETF

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The SPDR S&P 500 trust is an exchange-traded fund which trades on the NYSE Arca under the symbol (NYSE ArcaSPY). SPDR is an acronym for the Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipts, the former name of the ETF. It is designed to track the S&P 500 stock market index. This fund is the largest ETF in the world. SPDR is a trademark of Standard and Poor's Financial Services LLC,[1] a subsidiary of S&P Global. The ETF's CUSIP is 78462F103[2] and its ISIN is US78462F1030.[3] The fund has a net expense ratio of 0.0945%.[2] The value of one share of the ETF is worth approximately 1/10 of the cash S&P 500's current level. On December 1, 2021, the 30-Day average daily volume range for the past 5 years was 82.45 million shares, making it the ETF with the largest trading volume. The sponsor is SPDR Services LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Stock Exchange LLC. Dividends are distributed quarterly, and are based on the accumulated stock dividends held in trust, less any expenses of the trust. The trust seeks to provide investment results that, before expenses, correspond generally to the price and yield performance of the S&P 500 index.

History[edit]

The Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipts were launched by Boston asset manager State Street Global Advisors (SSgA) on January 22, 1993, as the first exchange-traded fund in the United States (preceded by the short-lived Index Participation Shares that launched in 1989); and are part of the SPDRs ETF chain.[4][5][6] Designed and developed by American Stock Exchange executives Nathan Most and Steven Bloom,[7][8] the fund first traded on that market, but has since been listed elsewhere, including the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE ArcaSPY).

Competition[edit]

Other ETFs that are based on the S&P 500 index include:

Performance[edit]

Returns of symbol SPY by year. The year-end adjusted closing price is adjusted for splits and dividend and/or capital gain distributions.

Year Year-end

Adjusted

Closing Price

Total Annual Return

Including Dividends

5 Year

Annualized

Return

10 Year

Annualized

Return

15 Year

Annualized

Return

20 Year

Annualized

Return

1994 $27.97 0.40%
1995 $38.61 38.05%
1996 $47.30 22.50%
1997 $63.13 33.47%
1998 $81.25 28.70% 23.87%
1999 $97.81 20.38% 28.45%
2000 $88.28 -9.75% 17.99%
2001 $77.90 -11.76% 10.49%
2002 $61.09 -21.58% -0.66%
2003 $78.30 28.17% -0.74% 10.89%
2004 $86.68 10.70% -2.39% 11.98%
2005 $90.86 4.82% 0.58% 8.94%
2006 $105.26
2007 $110.68
2008 $69.96
2009 $88.39
2010 $101.70
2011 $103.62
2012 $120.19
2013 $159.03
2014 $180.44
2015 $182.67
2016 $204.58
2017 $248.99
2018 $237.61
2019 $311.80
2020 $368.96
2021 $474.96

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Trademark search on SPDR". United States Patent and Trademark Office. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b "SPDR® S&P 500® ETF". State Street Global Advisers. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  3. ^ "Convert CUSIP to ISIN". Open ISIN Database. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  4. ^ John C. Bogle, 'Value' Strategies, Wall Street Journal (Feb. 9, 2007).
  5. ^ Wilfred Dellva, Exchange-Traded Funds Not for Everyone Archived 2008-07-05 at the Wayback Machine, Journal of Financial Planning (Apr. 2001).
  6. ^ Jennifer Bayot (2004-12-10). "Nathan Most Is Dead at 90; Investment Fund Innovator". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-23.
  7. ^ Carrel, Lawrence (2008), ETFs for the Long Run, John Wiley & Sons, 2008, ISBN 978-0-470-13894-6
  8. ^ "Steven Bloom Joins NASDAQ as Senior Vice President of Financial Products | Nasdaq, Inc". ir.nasdaq.com.
  9. ^ "Vanguard ETF Profile | Vanguard". investor.vanguard.com.
  10. ^ "iShares Core S&P 500 ETF | IVV". BlackRock.