SS Marama

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Hospital Ship Marama off Sinclair Head.jpeg
SS Marama serving as a hospital ship, 1915
History
New Zealand
Name: SS Marama
Owner: Union Company, Dunedin
Port of registry: Wellington
Route: New Zealand — Australia & Trans-Pacific
Builder: Caird & Company, Greenock
Cost: £166,000
Yard number: 313
Launched: 1907
In service: November 1907
Out of service: 1937
Identification: Official number: 117,597
Fate: Broken up,
General characteristics
Type: Ocean liner
Tonnage:
Length: 420 ft (130 m)
Beam: 53.2 ft (16.2 m)
Depth: 31.2 ft (9.5 m)
Speed: 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph)
Capacity:
  • 488 passengers:
  • 270 later 242 × 1st class
  • 120 later 214 × 2nd class
  • 98 later 32 × fore cabin or Interchange
Crew: 140

The SS Marama was an ocean liner belonging to the Union Company of New Zealand from 1907 to 1937. It was a hospital ship in WWI as His Majesty's New Zealand Hospital Ship No. 2.

History[edit]

Built by Caird & Company at Greenock at a cost of £166,000 ($332,000), the SS Marama arrived at Port Chalmers in November 1907. It was the largest and most powerful ship (though not the fastest) in the USS Co fleet. Initially, it sailed on the Horseshoe run to Australia, and occasionally in trans-Pacific services. After war service, it was refitted (1920) for the trans-Pacific services to San Francisco or Vancouver. In 1925, it was converted to burn oil, and employed on the Tasman run.

The ship was sold to Shanghai shipbreakers the Linghua Dock & Engineering Works Ltd in 1937, then resold to Kobe shipbreakers Miyachi K.K.K. (who had also purchased the Maheno) and was broken up at their Osaka shipyard in 1938.

Marama Hall at the University of Otago is named after the liner, commemorating medical personnel who served aboard the two New Zealand hospital ships in World War I.[1]

See also[edit]

SS Maheno: sister ship; His Majesty's New Zealand Hospital Ship No. 1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Marama Hall". New Zealand Military Nursing. Retrieved 2 October 2019.

External links[edit]