STATES Act

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The Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, S.3032, is a bill in the United States Congress that would recognize legalization of cannabis and the U.S. state laws that have legalized it through their legislatures or citizen initiative. It was introduced on June 7, 2018 by Senators Cory Gardner (Republican from Colorado) and Elizabeth Warren (Democrat from Massachusetts).[1] A companion bill was introduced the same day in the House of Representatives, sponsored by Earl Blumenauer (Democrat from Oregon) and David Joyce (Republican from Ohio).[2] The act would amend the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 to exempt from federal enforcement individuals or corporations in states who are in compliance with U.S. state, U.S. territory and the District of Columbia, or tribal law on cannabis, with certain additional provisions such as minimum ages.[3][4]

History[edit]

According to Voice of America, "The impetus for the legislation was a decision by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in January to rescind Obama-era Justice Department guidelines that encouraged prosecutors to adopt a hands-off approach to marijuana law enforcement in states where the substance was legal", referring to the Cole Memorandum provisions rescinded on January 4, 2018.[5]

On April 25, 2018, Senators Cory Gardner and Elizabeth Warren announced that they would introduce a bipartisan bill to prevent Federal interference with states that had legalized marijuana.[6][7][8][9] The announcement came a few days after Senator Gardner spoke with President Trump and announced that he had received assurances that the President would support such legislation.[10] As of late April, the details of the bill were unannounced but analysts said it "would not legalize cannabis nationally, but would allow each state the options of legalizing recreational or medical cannabis, or to continue to prohibit the plant entirely" and had announced the name of the bill.[11][12] On June 7, 2018, Warren introduced the bill in the U.S. Senate and Representative David Joyce introduced a companion bill in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Senate bill was referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee and the House bill was referred to the House Judiciary Committee and the House Energy and Commerce Committee.[13][14]

Cosponsors and support[edit]

Senate[edit]

  1. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Democratic-MA; original sponsor)[13]
  2. Sen. Cory Gardner (Republican-CO; original cosponsor)[13]
  3. Sen. Rand Paul (Republican-KY; original cosponsor)[13]
  4. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (Democratic-NV; original cosponsor)[13]
  5. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Republican-AK; original cosponsor)[13]
  6. Sen. Cory Booker (Democratic-NJ; original cosponsor; Senate Judiciary Committee Member)[13]
  7. Sen. Dan Sullivan (Republican-AK; original cosponsor)[13]
  8. Sen. Michael Bennet (Democratic-CO; original cosponsor)[13]
  9. Sen. Jeff Flake (Republican-AZ; cosponsored on June 18, 2018; Senate Judiciary Committee Member)[13]
  10. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Democratic-MN; cosponsored on June 18, 2018; Senate Judiciary Committee Member)[13]
  11. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Democratic-CA; cosponsored on September 12, 2018; Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member)[13]

House[edit]

  1. Rep. David Joyce (Republican OH-14; original sponsor)[14]
  2. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (Democratic OR-3; original cosponsor)[14]
  3. Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Republican FL-26; original cosponsor)[14]
  4. Rep. Jared Polis (Democratic CO-2; original cosponsor)[14]
  5. Rep. Ken Buck (Republican CO-4; original cosponsor; House Judiciary Committee Member)[14]
  6. Rep. Barbara Lee (Democratic CA-13; original cosponsor)[14]
  7. Rep. Walter B. Jones Jr. (Republican NC-3; original cosponsor)[14]
  8. Rep. Diana DeGette (Democratic CO-1; original cosponsor; House Energy and Commerce Committee Member)[14]
  9. Rep. Rod Blum (Republican IA-1; original cosponsor)[14]
  10. Rep. Steve Cohen (Democratic TN-9; original cosponsor; House Judiciary Committee Member)[14]
  11. Rep. Matt Gaetz (Republican FL-1; original cosponsor; House Judiciary Committee Member)[14]
  12. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (Democratic DC-AL; original cosponsor; non-voting member)[14]
  13. Rep. Tom McClintock (Republican CA-4; original cosponsor)[14]
  14. Rep. Lou Correa (Democratic CA-46; original cosponsor)[14]
  15. Rep. Jason Lewis (Republican MN-2; original cosponsor)[14]
  16. Rep. Ro Khanna (Democratic CA-17; original cosponsor)[14]
  17. Rep. Justin Amash (Republican MI-3; cosponsored on June 8, 2018)[14]
  18. Rep. Charlie Crist (Democratic FL-13; cosponsored on June 8, 2018)[14]
  19. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Republican CA-48; cosponsored on June 12, 2018)[14]
  20. Rep. Dina Titus (Democratic NV-1; cosponsored on June 12, 2018)[14]
  21. Rep. Mike Coffman (Republican CO-6; cosponsored on June 14, 2018)[14]
  22. Rep. Jacky Rosen (Democratic NV-3; cosponsored on June 14, 2018)[14]
  23. Rep. Thomas Massie (Republican KY-4; cosponsored on July 10, 2018)[14]
  24. Rep. Ed Perlmutter (Democratic CO-7; cosponsored on July 10, 2018)[14]
  25. Rep. Duncan D. Hunter (Republican CA-50; cosponsored on July 25, 2018)[14]
  26. Rep. Chellie Pingree (Democratic ME-1; cosponsored on July 25, 2018)[14]
  27. Rep. Raúl Labrador (Republican ID-1; cosponsored on August 10, 2018; House Judiciary Committee Member)[14]
  28. Rep. Tim Ryan (Democratic OH-13; cosponsored on August 10, 2018)[14]
  29. Rep. Ryan Costello (Republican PA-6; cosponsored on September 6, 2018; House Energy and Commerce Committee Member)[14]
  30. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (Democratic OR-1; cosponsored on September 6, 2018)[14]

Governors[edit]

  1. Gov. Bill Walker (Independent-AK; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  2. Gov. Jerry Brown (Democratic-CA; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  3. Gov. John Hickenlooper (Democratic-CO; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  4. Gov. Larry Hogan (Republican-MD; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  5. Gov. Charlie Baker (Republican-MA; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  6. Gov. Brian Sandoval (Republican-NV; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  7. Gov. Phil Murphy (Democratic-NJ; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  8. Gov. Andrew Cuomo (Democratic-NY; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  9. Gov. Doug Burgum (Republican-ND; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  10. Gov. Kate Brown (Democratic-OR; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  11. Gov. Tom Wolf (Democratic-PA; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]
  12. Gov. Jay Inslee (Democratic-WA; signed letter of support on June 8, 2018)[15]

Reactions[edit]

President Donald Trump said he "probably will end up supporting" the bill on June 8.[16] The same day, twelve governors, from West Coast states that had legalized cannabis for adult use, plus Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota and Pennsylvania, sent a letter to Congress urging passage of the measure.[17]

The Los Angeles Times's editorial board endorsed the proposal under a headline that said it was "kickstarting Congress' effort to legalize marijuana".[18]

A spokesperson for the Marijuana Policy Project called the STATES Act "the most significant piece of marijuana-related legislation ever introduced in Congress."[19]

The Suquamish Tribe in Washington State, one of the first tribes with legal cannabis sales, indicated support for the bill.[20]

Writing for Above the Law, a legal analysis website for attorneys, cannabis law specialist Hilary Bricken wrote that it was "for the first time ever, a real and legitimate bipartisan 'respect states' rights' effort" on "meaningful marijuana law reform at the Congressional level".[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ali ROGIN (Jun 7, 2018), Senators announce bill to protect states' ability to make marijuana laws, ABC News
  2. ^ Colby Itkowitz (June 7, 2018), "Republican senator hopeful Trump will back bill to protect states' rights on marijuana", The Washington Post
  3. ^ Sabrina Eaton (June 7, 2018), "Rep. Dave Joyce introduces bill that would let states decide their own marijuana laws", The Plain Dealer, Cleveland
  4. ^ Bruce KENNEDY (June 7, 2018), With Trump's Support, STATES Act Could End Nationwide Cannabis Prohibition, Leafly
  5. ^ Masood Farivar (June 7, 2018), Bill Would Let US States Enforce Own Marijuana Laws, Voice of America
  6. ^ Michael Walsh (April 25, 2018), Republican Sen. Cory Gardner to introduce cannabis bill for states' rights with Elizabeth Warren, Yahoo News
  7. ^ Ben Markus (April 25, 2018), Gardner To Bring Bipartisan Cannabis Bill To Senate Floor, Colorado Public Radio
  8. ^ Chloe Aiello (April 26, 2018), Elizabeth Warren and Cory Gardner team up for a bipartisan Senate bill to back states' rights on marijuana: Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado told Yahoo News he met with Sen. Elizabeth Warren to discuss a bill to prevent the feds from meddling in state-controlled marijuana industries., CNBC
  9. ^ Jordan Graham (April 29, 2018), "Liz Warren has high hopes for pot bill", Boston Herald
  10. ^ Seung Min Kim (April 13, 2018), "Trump, Gardner strike deal on legalized marijuana, ending standoff over Justice nominees", The Washington Post
  11. ^ Chris Moore (April 26, 2018), Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Gardner Announce Cannabis States' Rights Bill, Merry Jane
  12. ^ Paul Danish (May 17, 2018), "Cory Gardner and politics as the art of the possible", Boulder Weekly
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Cosponsors - S.3032 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): STATES Act". www.congress.gov. Retrieved July 7, 2018.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "Cosponsors - H.R.6043 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): STATES Act". www.congress.gov. Retrieved July 7, 2018.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Dumcius, Gintautas (June 8, 2018). "Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker backs Sen. Elizabeth Warren's marijuana bill, urges Capitol Hill leaders to pass the legislation". MassLive.com. Advance Publications. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  16. ^ Em Steck (June 8, 2018), Marijuana efforts gain momentum in states, Congress, UPI
  17. ^ Paul Danish (June 14, 2018), "Marijuana reform comes to Congress — fast and furious", Boulder Weekly
  18. ^ The Times Editorial Board (June 16, 2018), Thank you, Jeff Sessions, for inadvertently kickstarting Congress' effort to legalize marijuana, The Los Angeles Times
  19. ^ Mark K. Matthews and Brooke Staggs (June 7, 2018), "California's legalized marijuana would be federally lawful under bill introduced by Cory Gardner, Elizabeth Warren", The Orange County Register
  20. ^ "Trump will 'probably end up supporting' marijuana bill that helps tribes". indianz.com. Winnebago Tribe. June 12, 2018.
  21. ^ Hilary Bricken (June 18, 2018). "ICYMI: Legitimate Marijuana Reform May Be On The Horizon For . . . Congress!". Above the Law.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]