Sabine County, Texas

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Sabine County
The Sabine County Courthouse
The Sabine County Courthouse
Map of Texas highlighting Sabine County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 31°20′N 93°51′W / 31.34°N 93.85°W / 31.34; -93.85
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1837
Named forSabine River
SeatHemphill
Largest cityMilam
Area
 • Total577 sq mi (1,490 km2)
 • Land491 sq mi (1,270 km2)
 • Water85 sq mi (220 km2)  15%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total9,894
 • Density17/sq mi (6.6/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.co.sabine.tx.us

Sabine County is a county located on the central eastern border of the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 9,894.[1] The county was organized on December 14, 1837, and named for the Sabine River, which forms its eastern border.


Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 577 square miles (1,490 km2), of which 491 square miles (1,270 km2) is land and 85 square miles (220 km2) (15%) is water.[2]

Major highways[edit]

National Protected Areas[edit]

Adjacent counties and parish[edit]

History[edit]

Like other eastern Texas counties, Sabine was originally developed as cotton plantations, which depended on the labor of numerous enslaved African Americans. After the Civil War and emancipation, many freedmen remained in the rural area, working as tenant farmers and sharecroppers. There was considerable violence by whites against blacks during and after Reconstruction. After 1877 and through the early 20th century, Sabine County had 10 lynchings of blacks by whites in acts of racial terrorism. This was the fourth-highest total in the state, where lynchings took place in nearly all counties through this period.[3]

From 1930 to 1970, the population declined as many African Americans left this rural county and other parts of the South in the Great Migration to escape Jim Crow oppression and seek better jobs, especially in Northern industrial cities and on the West Coast, where the defense industry built up beginning during World War II.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18502,498
18602,75010.1%
18703,25618.4%
18804,16127.8%
18904,96919.4%
19006,39428.7%
19108,58234.2%
192012,29943.3%
193011,998−2.4%
194010,896−9.2%
19508,568−21.4%
19607,302−14.8%
19707,187−1.6%
19808,70221.1%
19909,58610.2%
200010,4699.2%
201010,8343.5%
20209,894−8.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1850–2010[5] 2010–2020[6]

2020 census[edit]

Sabine County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[7] Pop 2020[6] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 9,484 9,894 87.54% 83.96%
Black or African American alone (NH) 778 734 7.18% 7.42%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 54 51 0.50% 0.52%
Asian alone (NH) 33 52 0.30% 0.53%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 6 35 0.06% 0.35%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 135 322 1.25% 3.25%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 344 393 3.18% 3.97%
Total 10,834 9,894 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census[edit]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 10,469 people, 4,485 households, and 3,157 families residing in the county. The population density was 21 people per square mile (8/km2). There were 7,659 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.85% White, 9.92% Black or African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.82% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 1.81% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,485 households, out of which 23.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 8.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.60% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.78.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.10% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 21.10% from 25 to 44, 27.20% from 45 to 64, and 24.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,198, and the median income for a family was $32,554. Males had a median income of $28,695 versus $21,141 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,821. About 11.80% of families and 15.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.90% of those under age 18 and 12.70% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve Sabine County:

The county is in the service area of Angelina College.[9]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated areas[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Historical communities[edit]

COVID-19 pandemic[edit]

In July 2021, Sabine County ranked the highest in the United States for cases of Coronavirus per 100,000 people.[11] Deaths in Texas are especially high among those that had not been vaccinated.[12]

Politics[edit]

Sabine County has become a solidly Republican county since the beginning of the 21st century but previously leaned Democratic, voting for Bill Clinton in both 1992 and 1996 and also against Texan George H. W. Bush in 1988 and 1992.

Sabine County is represented in the Texas House of Representatives by Republican Chris Paddie, a radio broadcaster and former mayor of Marshall in Harrison County.

United States presidential election results for Sabine County, Texas[13]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 4,784 87.12% 669 12.18% 38 0.69%
2016 3,998 85.96% 614 13.20% 39 0.84%
2012 3,727 81.41% 807 17.63% 44 0.96%
2008 3,749 76.92% 1,077 22.10% 48 0.98%
2004 3,138 67.64% 1,476 31.82% 25 0.54%
2000 2,764 60.20% 1,753 38.18% 74 1.61%
1996 1,660 42.29% 1,913 48.74% 352 8.97%
1992 1,490 31.85% 2,288 48.91% 900 19.24%
1988 1,925 48.28% 2,053 51.49% 9 0.23%
1984 2,045 51.21% 1,940 48.59% 8 0.20%
1980 1,387 40.82% 1,983 58.36% 28 0.82%
1976 904 27.43% 2,391 72.54% 1 0.03%
1972 1,333 58.64% 936 41.18% 4 0.18%
1968 455 18.44% 1,078 43.68% 935 37.88%
1964 428 19.19% 1,801 80.76% 1 0.04%
1960 619 33.59% 1,208 65.55% 16 0.87%
1956 801 46.71% 913 53.24% 1 0.06%
1952 729 31.67% 1,573 68.33% 0 0.00%
1948 104 7.26% 1,078 75.28% 250 17.46%
1944 203 14.01% 1,169 80.68% 77 5.31%
1940 157 8.80% 1,626 91.09% 2 0.11%
1936 108 8.14% 1,216 91.70% 2 0.15%
1932 57 3.08% 1,789 96.76% 3 0.16%
1928 419 34.18% 807 65.82% 0 0.00%
1924 61 5.01% 1,150 94.42% 7 0.57%
1920 61 6.19% 637 64.67% 287 29.14%
1916 22 2.90% 681 89.72% 56 7.38%
1912 19 3.70% 425 82.85% 69 13.45%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sabine County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  3. ^ Lynching in America, Third Edition: Supplement by County, pp. 9-10, Equal Justice Initiative, Mobile, AL, 2017
  4. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  5. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Sabine County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  7. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Sabine County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  8. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  9. ^ Texas Education Code, Sec. 130.165. ANGELINA COUNTY JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA, Statutes.capitol.texas.gov
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 24, 2020. Retrieved September 4, 2014.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ Times, The New York (March 3, 2020). "Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count". Nytimes.com. Retrieved February 8, 2022.
  12. ^ DeGuzman, Colleen (July 21, 2021). "Texas has seen nearly 9,000 COVID-19 deaths since February. All but 43 were unvaccinated people". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved February 8, 2022.
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 30, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°20′N 93°51′W / 31.34°N 93.85°W / 31.34; -93.85