Sad Eyes

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This article is about the Robert John song. For the Bruce Springsteen song, see Sad Eyes (Bruce Springsteen song). For the Andy Williams song, see Sad Eyes (Andy Williams song).
"Sad Eyes"
Single by Robert John
from the album Robert John
Released April 1979
Format 7"
Recorded 1979
Genre Soft rock
Length 4:12
Label EMI
Writer(s) Robert John
Producer(s) George Tobin in association with Mike Piccirillo
Certification Gold

"Sad Eyes" is a song written and recorded by Robert John, and released in April 1979. It debuted May 19 on the Billboard Hot 100, reaching the top of the chart on October 6. The song was produced by George Tobin in Association With Mike Piccirillo.

"Sad Eyes" is one of just a few non-disco, or disco-influenced, songs to top the 1979 pop charts, although by the time it went to number one the anti-disco backlash had made it easier for other styles to reach the top.

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1979) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100 1
US Billboard Adult Contemporary 10
UK Singles Charts 31
Canadian RPM Top Tracks 3
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary 10

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1979) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100 10
Canadian RPM Top Tracks 14

Personnel[edit]

Album credits list these musicians involved during the sessions from which Sad Eyes was taken.[1]

Cover versions[edit]

A cover by American country music group Trader-Price peaked at number 55 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in 1989.[2]Kyle Vincent also recorded the song, released on "Absolutely The Best of the 70s", credited to Bo Donaldson and The Heywoods, and produced by Ron Dante.A cover version appears on Robin Lee's album " Black Velvet" released in 1990.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Robert John - Robert John, Credits". Allmusic. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2013). Hot Country Songs 1944–2012. Record Research, Inc. p. 339. ISBN 978-0-89820-203-8. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"My Sharona" by The Knack
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
October 6, 1979
Succeeded by
"Don't Stop 'til You Get Enough" by Michael Jackson