Sadeness (Part I)

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"Sadeness (Part I)"
EnigmaSadeness.jpg
Single by Enigma
from the album MCMXC a.D.
Released1990
Format
Recorded1990
Genre
Length4:16
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)Michael Cretu
Enigma singles chronology
"Sadeness (Part I)"
(1990)
"Mea Culpa (Part II)"
(1991)
Music video
"Sadeness (Part I)" on YouTube
The Gregorian antiphon Procedamus In Pace! Cum Angelis. This music, used in "Sadeness", was composed for the Easter liturgy.

"Sadeness (Part I)" is a song by German musical project Enigma. The song was released in 1990 as the first of four singles from their debut album MCMXC a.D. (1990). It became an international hit, reaching number one in 24 countries.[citation needed] In the United States, the song peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one on its dance chart. A sequel to the song, "Sadeness (Part II)" featuring Anggun, was released on Enigma's eighth studio album, The Fall of a Rebel Angel (2016).[1]

History[edit]

"Sadeness" was written by Michael Cretu (under the pseudonym Curly M.C.), Frank Peterson (under the pseudonym F. Gregorian), and Fabrice Cuitad (under the pseudonym David Fairstein). The song was named "Sadeness (Part I)" on its single release in Germany, and "Sadness Part I" on its single release in the United Kingdom and Japan. It is a sensual track based around "questioning" the sexual desires of Marquis de Sade; hence the German release name of "Sadeness", as opposed to the English word of "Sadness" used in the UK release. The track reached number-one faster than any new release in German history - before its video clip had even been finished. The record company Virgin had done virtually no promotion on the song. Sales took off purely on the strength of radio and club play.[2]

Music[edit]

The track makes use of the following:

  • Gregorian vocals mostly taken from the 1976 album Paschale Mysterium by the German choir Capella Antiqua München with conductor Konrad Ruhland. Particularly prominent is music from "Procedamus in pace!", an antiphon which is the second track on the album. The vocals were at first used without permission; a lawsuit followed in 1994 and was settled by compensation.
  • French lyrics whispered by Cretu's then-wife, Sandra, who at the time of Enigma's formation had already had hit singles as a solo artist.

Lyrics[edit]

The lyrics are in Latin and French.

Latin lyrics[edit]

Procedamus in pace! is related to Psalm 24. A section of the Latin text quotes directly from the psalm: Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in is the King James Version. In Christian theology, the words have been taken to refer to the ascension to heaven.

French lyrics[edit]

The female French lyrics address "Sade". The Extended Trance Mix from the CD single contains some additional male lyrics in French.

Influence[edit]

It was followed by a pseudo-sequel named "Mea Culpa (Part II)", which was a moderate commercial success compared with "Sadeness (Part I)".

The 1991 opening theme for the video game Streets of Rage, released on Sega Megadrive, shares an identical drum beat to "Sadeness (Part I)", which is believed to be a major influence on the music heard in the game.

The song was featured in the first episode of the second season of Chappelle's Show. The song is also featured on It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia episode The Gang Gets a New Member.

The song can be heard on the 2008 action slapstick film Tropic Thunder during the faux trailer for Kirk Lazarus's (Robert Downey, Jr.) recent film Satan's Alley.

The song's notable drum loop was used for the executioner entrance in the "Jester's Nightmare" number of the 2000 and 2001 tours of Michael Flatley's second show, Feet of Flames.

Critical reception[edit]

Leah Greenblatt from Entertainment Weekly described the song as a "incense trance".[3] The Gavin Report wrote, "Listeners may not have a clue what it's about, but the mood created by this totally unique production will keep 'em glued and wanting more. Not only have the Germans demolished the Berlin Wall, they had the good sense to make this a number one "sod - as in (Marquis De Sade) ness."[4] Ian Cranna from Smash Hits noted the "atmospheric lines" of the song in his review of MCMXC a.D. and said it's "combining medieval monks' chants and wispy, wistful synthesiser driftings over hippety-hoppety beats."[5] Bob Mack from Spin called it "the Dark Ages disco cut". He added that "the track starts with a standard call and response—but it's one of monks doing Gregorian chants. After the beats kick in, synth washes buoy the flute flourishes, while French spoken words and heavy female panting get the point across."[6]

Charts[edit]

The single reached number one on the UK Singles Chart in January 1991, as well as in over 20 other countries around that period.[7] It remained at number one on the Eurochart for nine weeks. In the United States, it peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in April 1991. The record sold over 500,000 copies in the US and was certified Gold there.[8] The single has sold more than 5 million copies worldwide.[9]

Music video[edit]

The video, directed by Michel Guimbard,[10] shows a scribe who dreams of wandering among cathedral ruins. He comes up to Auguste Rodin's The Gates of Hell; and as the scribe looks on, he sees a woman (played by French model Cathy Tastet[11][12]) beyond it, who whispers the main lyrics from the song to him. The video ends with the scribe waking up.

Track listings[edit]

  • 4-track CD single for the UK
  1. "Sadeness Part I" (Radio Edit) – 4:16
  2. "Sadeness Part I" (Extended Trance Mix) – 5:04
  3. "Sadeness Part I" (Meditation Mix) – 3:01
  4. "Sadeness Part I" (Violent US Remix) – 5:03
  • 5-track CD single for the US
  1. "Sadeness Part I" (Violent US Remix) – 5:03
  2. "Sadeness Part I" (Meditation Mix) – 3:01
  3. "Sadeness Part I" (Extended Trance Mix) – 5:04
  4. "Sadeness Part I" (Radio Edit) – 4:17
  5. "Introit: Benedicta sit sancta Trinitas" – 3:04
  • 2-track promotional CD single for Japan
  1. "Sadeness Part I" (Ebi-Kuma Mix) – 4:40
  2. "Sadeness Part I" (Meditation Mix)
  • 2-track 7-inch single for France
  1. "Sadeness Part I" (Radio Edit) – 4:17
  2. "Sadeness Part I" (Meditation Mix) – 2:57

Charts and certifications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Getz, Dana (8 August 2016). "Enigma announce first album in 8 years". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved August 9, 2016.
  2. ^ "Spotlight: Enigma" (PDF). Music & Media. January 12, 1991. p. 12. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  3. ^ "1991 chart flashback". Entertainment Weekly. March 18, 2011. Retrieved February 27, 2020.
  4. ^ Sholin, Dave (February 1, 1991). "Gavin Picks > Singles" (PDF). Gavin Report. No. 1841. p. 56. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  5. ^ "Review: LPs". Smash Hits. January 23, 1991. p. 46. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  6. ^ Mack, Bob (April 1991). "Singles". Spin. p. 94. Retrieved February 27, 2020.
  7. ^ "crocodile-music.de". crocodile-music.de. September 19, 2008. Retrieved October 14, 2010.
  8. ^ "American single certifications – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved June 29, 2012. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH. 
  9. ^ Weinert, Ellie (March 4, 1995). "Billboard Vol. 107, No. 9 – Casebook: Enigma". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media: 58. Retrieved August 7, 2011.
  10. ^ http://www.newagemusic.guide/new-age-music/the-story-behind-sadeness-part-i-video/
  11. ^ "Who's that girl?? Behind The Scenes of "ENIGMA - Sadeness Part I." video". enigmamusic.com. Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  12. ^ Kati Tastet at the Internet Movie Database
  13. ^ "Australian-charts.com – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". ARIA Top 50 Singles.
  14. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Enigma – Sadeness Part I" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40.
  15. ^ "Ultratop.be – Enigma – Sadeness Part I" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50.
  16. ^ "Top RPM Singles: Issue 1492." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  17. ^ "Top RPM Dance/Urban: Issue 1463." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  18. ^ "Top 10 Denmark" (PDF). Music & Media. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  19. ^ "Eurochart Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 8 no. 3. 19 January 1991. p. 39. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  20. ^ "Enigma: Sadeness Part I" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland.
  21. ^ "Lescharts.com – Enigma – Sadeness Part I" (in French). Les classement single.
  22. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  23. ^ "Top 10 Greece" (PDF). Music & Media. Retrieved 20 March 2018.
  24. ^ "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Sadness Part I". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  25. ^ "Top 10 in Europe" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 8 no. 7. 16 February 1991. p. 30. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  26. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – Enigma" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40.
  27. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Enigma – Sadeness Part I" (in Dutch). Single Top 100.
  28. ^ "Charts.nz – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". Top 40 Singles.
  29. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". VG-lista.
  30. ^ "Top 10 Portugal" (PDF). Music & Media. Retrieved 20 March 2018.
  31. ^ Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE. ISBN 84-8048-639-2.
  32. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". Singles Top 100.
  33. ^ "Swisscharts.com – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". Swiss Singles Chart.
  34. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  35. ^ a b c Billboard Allmusic.com . Retrieved 10 September 2008.
  36. ^ 1991 Australian Singles Chart aria.com . Retrieved 10 September 2008.
  37. ^ 1991 Austrian Singles Chart Austriancharts.at . Retrieved 10 September 2008.
  38. ^ "RPM 100 Hit Tracks of 1991". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  39. ^ "RPM Dance Tracks of 1991". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  40. ^ "Single top 100 over 1991" (PDF) (in Dutch). Top40. Retrieved 2 July 2011.
  41. ^ "Eurochart Hot 100 1991" (PDF). Music & Media. 8 (51–52): 21. December 21, 1991. Retrieved January 17, 2020 – via American Radio History.
  42. ^ "End of Year Charts 1991". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  43. ^ 1991 Swiss Singles Chart Hitparade.ch . Retrieved 10 September 2008.
  44. ^ "1991 Top 100 Singles". Music Week. London, England: Spotlight Publications. 11 January 1992. p. 20.
  45. ^ "Billboard Top 100 - 1991". Archived from the original on 7 July 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2009.
  46. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010. Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing.
  47. ^ "Austrian single certifications – Enigma – Sadeness" (in German). IFPI Austria. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  48. ^ "Les Singles en Or :" (in French). Infodisc.fr. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  49. ^ "French single certifications – Enigma – Sadeness" (in French). InfoDisc. Select ENIGMA and click OK. 
  50. ^ "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Enigma; 'Sadeness Part One')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  51. ^ "Dutch single certifications – Enigma – Sadeness" (in Dutch). Nederlandse Vereniging van Producenten en Importeurs van beeld- en geluidsdragers. Retrieved 29 June 2012. Enter Sadeness in the "Artiest of titel" box.
  52. ^ "Guld- och Platinacertifikat − År 1987−1998" (PDF) (in Swedish). IFPI Sweden. Retrieved 29 June 2012.
  53. ^ "British single certifications – Enigma – Sadness Part I". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 29 June 2012. Select singles in the Format field. Select Silver in the Certification field. Type Sadness Part I in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.
  54. ^ "American single certifications – Enigma – Sadeness Part I". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 29 June 2012. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH. 

External links[edit]