Liberty Korea Party

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Liberty Korea Party

자유한국당
Jayuhangukdang
LeaderHwang Kyo-ahn
Floor leaderNa Kyung-won
Secretary GeneralHan Sun-kyo
Chairman of the Policy Planning CommitteeJeong Yong-ki
Founded21 November 1997
(Grand National Party)
2 February 2012
(Saenuri Party)
13 February 2017
(Liberty Korea Party)
Merger ofUnited Liberal Democrats
Future Hope Alliance
Advancement Unification Party
Evergreen Korea Party
Preceded byNew Korea Party
Democratic Party (1996)
Headquarters18, Gukhoe-daero 70-gil
Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul
149-871
Membership (2018)Approximately 3,500,000[1]
IdeologyConservatism[2][3][4]
Social conservatism[5]
National conservatism[6]
Right-wing populism[7][8][9]
Anti-communism[10][11][12]
Economic liberalism[13]
Factions:
Neoconservatism[14][15][16]
Paleoconservatism[17]
Political positionModern
Right-wing[18][19] to far-right[20]
Historical (1997~2016)
Centre-right[21][22][23][24]
to right-wing[25]
Regional affiliationAsia Pacific Democrat Union
International affiliationInternational Democrat Union
ColoursRed
SloganTogether, into the future
Seats in the National Assembly
110 / 300
Municipal mayor and Gubernatorial
2 / 17
Municipal Mayors
53 / 226
Seats within local government
1,146 / 3,750
Website
www.libertykoreaparty.kr
Liberty Korea Party
Hangul
Hanja
Revised RomanizationJayuhangukdang
McCune–ReischauerChayuhan'guktang
Korea Party
Hangul
Hanja
Revised RomanizationHangukdang
McCune–ReischauerHan'guktang
Headquarters of the Liberty Korea Party

The Liberty Korea Party (Korean자유한국당; Hanja自由韓國黨; RRJayuhangukdang) is a conservative[2][3][4] political party in South Korea that is described variously as right-wing,[26][27] right-wing populist,[7] or far-right[20]. Until February 2017, it was known as the Saenuri Party (Korean새누리당), and before that as the Hannara Party (Korean한나라당; lit. Grand National Party) from 1997 to 2012, both of which are still colloquially used to refer to the party. The party formerly held a plurality of seats in the 20th Assembly before its ruling status was transferred to the Democratic Party of Korea on December 27, 2016, following the creation of the splinter Bareun Party by former Saenuri members who distanced themselves from President Park Geun-hye in the 2016 South Korean political scandal .

The party has been described as social conservative,[28] economic liberal[29] and anti-communist.[30][31][32] Parts of the LKP have racist,[33] homophobic,[34][35] xenophobic[36] and pro-military dictatorship[37] tendencies.

History[edit]

1997: Foundation of Hannara party[edit]

The party was founded in 1997, when the United Democratic Party and New Korea Party merged. Its earliest ancestor was the Democratic Republican Party[38] under the authoritarian rule of Park Chung-hee in 1963. On Park's death, and at the beginning of the rule of Chun Doo-hwan in 1980, it was reconstituted and renamed as the Democratic Justice Party. In 1988, party member Roh Tae-woo introduced a wide range of political reforms including direct presidential elections and a new constitution. The party was renamed in 1993, during the presidency of Kim Young-sam,[39] with the merger of other parties to form the Democratic Liberal Party (Minju Jayudang). It was renamed as the New Korea Party (Sinhangukdang) in 1995, and it then became the Grand National Party in November 1997 following its merger with the smaller United Democratic Party and various conservative parties.[40]

1998–2007: Lost ten years[edit]

Three months later, in 1998, with the election of Kim Dae-jung of the Democratic Party as president, the conservative party's governing role came to an end, and it began its first ever period in opposition, which would last ten years. In October 2012, the Advancement Unification Party merged with the Saenuri Party.[41]

Following the 2000 parliamentary elections, it was the single largest political party, with 54% of the vote and 133 seats out of 271. The party continued to control the National Assembly.

The party was defeated in the parliamentary election in 2004 following the attempted impeachment of President Roh Moo-hyun, gaining only 121 seats out of 299. The party's defeat reflected public disapproval of the attempted impeachment, which was instigated by the party. This was the first time in its history the party had not won the most seats. It gained back five seats in by-elections, bringing it to 127 seats as of October 28, 2005.[42]

2008–2012: Recovering position of the ruling party and Lee Myung-bak government[edit]

On December 19, 2007, the GNP's candidate, former Seoul mayor Lee Myung-bak won the presidential election,[43] ending the party's ten-year period in opposition.

In the April 2008 general election, the GNP secured a majority of 153 seats out of 299 and gained power in the administration and the parliament as well as most local governments, despite low voter turnout.[44]

One of the main bases of popular support of the party originates from the conservative, traditionalist elite and the rural population, except for farmers. It is strongest in the Gyeongsang region. Former party head, and 2007 presidential candidate, Park Geun-hye is the daughter of former President Park Chung-hee who ruled from 1961 to 1979. Although Representative Won Hee-ryeong and Hong Jun-pyo ran for the party primary as reformist candidates, former Seoul mayor and official presidential candidate Lee Myung-bak gained more support (about 40%) from the Korean public.

The GNP suffered a setback in the 2010 local elections, losing a total of 775 local seats throughout the counties,[45] but remained with the most seats in the region.

GNP-affiliated politician, Oh Se-hoon, lost his mayoral position in Seoul after the Seoul Free Lunch Referendum.

The Grand National Party celebrated its 14th anniversary on November 21, 2011, amid uncertainties from intra-party crises.[46]

The DDoS attacks during the October 2011 by-election have become a central concern of the GNP as it could potentially disintegrate the party leadership.[47]

2012–2016: Renaming to Saenuri party and Park Geun-hye government[edit]

Emergency Response Commission[edit]

The Hong Jun-pyo leadership system collapsed on December 9, 2011, and the GNP Emergency Response Commission was launched on December 17, 2011, with Park Geun-hye as commission chairperson, to prepare for the forthcoming Legislative Election 2012 on April 11, 2012, and the Presidential Election 2012 on December 19, 2012.[48]

There was a debate with Commission members about whether to transform the Grand National Party into a non-conservative political party or not, but Park said the GNP would never become non-conservative and will follow the real values of conservatism.[49][50]

2016–2019: 2016 South Korean political scandal and impeachment[edit]

Official color[edit]

In February 2012, the party changed its political official color from blue to red. This was a change from the previous 30 years where blue was usually the symbol of the conservative parties.[51]

Policy[edit]

The party supports free trade and neoliberal economic policies. It favors maintaining strong cooperation with the United States and Japan while distancing South Korea from North Korea. The party is also conservative on social issues such as opposition to legal recognition of same-sex couples.

Four major rivers project[edit]

One of the party's important policies is to financially secure The Four Major Rivers Project since President Lee Myung-bak was in office. This project's budget disputes have sparked controversial political motions in the National Assembly for three consecutive years.[52]

Sejong City project[edit]

The party has been less inclined toward the creation of a new capital city for South Korea, to be called Sejong City than the previous administration. As of 2012, the Saenuri Party has indicated that some governmental offices will be relocated to the new city, but not all.

Human rights activism[edit]

The party has been very active in promoting the North Korean Human Rights Law, which would officially condemn the use of torture, public executions and other human rights violations in North Korea.[53]

Party representative Ha Tae Kyung is the founder of Open Radio for North Korea, an NGO dedicated to spreading news and information about democracy, to which citizens of North Korea have little access due to their government's isolationist policies.[54] In April 2012, Saenuri member Cho Myung-Chul became the first North Korean defector elected to the National Assembly.[55] In spring 2012, several Saenuri representatives took part in the Save My Friend protests, organized to oppose China's policy of repatriating North Korean defectors, and expressed their solidarity with Park Sun-young's hunger strike.[56]

List of leaders[edit]

Chairpersons[edit]

  • Note
  • ERC - as head of Emergency Response Committee
  • * - as the de facto head of party
No. Term Name Term of office Election results
Took office Left office
1 1 Lee Han-dong 21 November 1997 10 April 1998 Appointed
* 2 Cho Soon* 10 April 1998 5 August 1998 No election
Lee Han-dong 5 August 1998 31 August 1998 Acting
* 3 Lee Hoi-chang* 31 August 1998 22 May 2000 see 1998 election
Seo Cheong-won 22 May 2000 30 May 2000 Acting
* 4 Lee Hoi-chang* 30 May 2000 2 April 2002 see 2000 election
Park Kwan-yong 2 April 2002 14 May 2002 Acting
2 5 Seo Cheong-won 14 May 2002 30 January 2003 see 2002 election
Park Hee-tae 30 January 2003 26 June 2003 Acting
3 6 Choi Byeong-yul 26 June 2003 23 March 2004 see 2003 election
4 7 Park Geun-hye 23 March 2004 5 July 2004 see March 2004 election
Kim Deok-ryong 5 July 2004 19 July 2004 Acting
(4) 8 Park Geun-hye 19 July 2004 15 June 2006 see July 2004 election
Kim Yeong-seon 15 June 2006 10 July 2006 Acting
5 9 Kang Jae-sup 11 July 2006 4 July 2008 see 2006 election
6 10 Park Hee-tae 4 July 2008 7 September 2009 see 2008 election
7 11 Chung Mong-joon 7 September 2009 4 June 2010 No election
Kim Moo-sungERC 4 June 2010 14 July 2010 Appointed
8 12 Ahn Sang-soo 14 July 2010 9 May 2011 see 2010 election
Jeong Ui-hwaERC 9 May 2011 4 July 2011 Appointed
9 13 Hong Jun-pyo 4 July 2011 9 December 2011 see 2011 election
Na Kyung-won 9 December 2011 12 December 2011 Acting
Hwang Woo-yea 12 December 2011 19 December 2011 Acting
Park Geun-hyeERC 19 December 2011 15 May 2012 Appointed
10 14 Hwang Woo-yea 15 May 2012 15 May 2014 see 2012 election
Lee Wan-kooERC 15 May 2014 14 July 2014 Appointed
11 15 Kim Moo-sung 14 July 2014 14 April 2016 see 2014 election
Won Yoo-chul 14 April 2016 11 May 2016 Acting
Chung Jin-suk 11 May 2016 2 June 2016 Acting
Kim Hee-okERC 2 June 2016 9 August 2016 Appointed
12 16 Lee Jung-hyun 9 August 2016 16 December 2016 see 2016 election
Chung Woo-taik 16 December 2016 29 December 2016 Acting
In Myung-jinERC 29 December 2016 1 April 2017 Appointed
Chung Woo-taik 1 April 2017 3 July 2017 Acting
13 17 Hong Jun-pyo 3 July 2017 14 June 2018 see 2017 election
Kim Sung-tae 14 June 2018 17 July 2018 Acting
Kim Byong-joonERC 17 July 2018 27 February 2019 Appointed
14 18 Hwang Kyo-ahn 27 February 2019 Incumbent see 2019 election

Assembly leaders (Floor leaders)[edit]

No. Name Term of office
Took office Left office
1 Mok Yo-sang (목요상) 21 November 1997 16 December 1997
2 Lee Sang-deuk 16 December 1997 5 April 1998
3 Ha Soon-bong (하순봉) 5 April 1998 27 August 1998
4 Park Hee-tae (박희태) 27August 1998 14 January 1999
5 Lee Boo-young (이부영) 14 January 1999 1 June 2000
6 Jung Chang-hwa (정창화) 1 June 2000 13 May 2001
7 Lee Jae-oh 13 May 2001 16 May 2002
8 Lee Kyu-taek (이규택) 16 May 2002 29 June 2003
9 Hong Sa-duk (홍사덕) 29 June 2003 18 May 2004
10 Kim Duk-ryong (김덕룡) 18 May 2004 4 March 2005
11 Kang Jae-sup 4 March 2005 11 January 2006
12 Lee Jae-oh 11 January 2006 12 July 2006
13 Kim Hyun-goh (김형오) 12 July 2006 26 August 2007
14 Ahn Sang-soo 26 August 2007 17 May 2008
15 Hong Jun-pyo 17 May 2008 20 May 2009
(14) Ahn Sang-soo 20 May 2009 3 May 2010
16 Kim Moo-sung 3 May 2010 5 May 2011
17 Hwang Woo-yea 5 May 2011 8 May 2012
18 Lee Hahn-koo 8 May 2012 14 May 2013
19 Choi Kyoung-hwan 15 May 2013 7 May 2014
20 Lee Wan-koo 7 May 2014 25 January 2015
21 Yoo Seong-min 1 February 2015 8 July 2015
22 Won Yoo-chul 14 July 2015 3 May 2016
23 Chung Jin-suk (정진석) 3 May 2016 12 December 2016
24 Chung Woo-taik (정우택) 16 December 2016 11 December 2017
25 Kim Sung-tae 11 December 2017 11 December 2018
26 Na Kyung-won 11 December 2018 Incumbent

Election results[edit]

Presidential elections[edit]

Election Candidate Total votes Share of votes Outcome
1997 Lee Hoi-chang 9,935,718 38.7% Lost Red XN
2002 Lee Hoi-chang 11,443,297 46.5% Lost Red XN
2007 Lee Myung-bak 11,492,389 48.7% Elected Green tickY
2012 Park Geun-hye 15,773,128 51.6% Elected Green tickY
2017 Hong Jun-pyo 7,841,017 24% Lost Red XN

Legislative elections[edit]

Election Total seats won Total votes Share of votes Outcome of election Election leader
2000
133 / 273
7,365,359 39.0% Increase13 seats; Minority Opposition Lee Hoi-chang
2004
121 / 299
7,613,660 35.8% Decrease24 seats; Minority Opposition Park Geun-hye
2008
153 / 299
6,421,727 37.4% Increase32 seats; Majority Government Kang Jae-seop
2012
152 / 300
9,130,651 42.8% Decrease1 seats; Majority Government Park Geun-hye
2016
122 / 300
7,960,272 33.5% Decrease24 seats; Minority Government Kim Moo-sung

Local elections[edit]

Election Metropolitan mayor/Governor Provincial legislature Municipal mayor Municipal legislature Election leader
1998
6 / 16
224 / 616
74 / 232
Cho Soon
2002
11 / 16
467 / 682
136 / 227
Seo Cheong-won
2006
12 / 16
557 / 733
155 / 230
1,621 / 2,888
Park Geun-hye
2010
6 / 16
288 / 761
82 / 228
1,247 / 2,888
Chung Mong-joon
2014
8 / 17
416 / 789
117 / 226
1,413 / 2,898
Lee Wan-koo
2018
2 / 17
137 / 824
53 / 226
1,009 / 2,927
Hong Jun-pyo

Footnotes[edit]

Party Splits[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 원내대책회의 주요내용[보도자료]
  2. ^ a b Manyin, Mark E. (2010), U.S.-South Korea Relations, Congressional Research Service, p. 26, ISBN 9781437944167
  3. ^ a b Shin, Gi-Wook (2010), One Alliance, Two Lenses: U.S.-Korea Relations in a New Era, Stanford University Press, p. 208, ISBN 9780804763691
  4. ^ a b Peterson, Mark; Margulies, Phillip (2010), A Brief History of Korea, Facts On File, p. 242, ISBN 9781438127385
  5. ^ Kang, Jin-Kyu. "Gay rights get a negative spin at fourth presidential debate". Joongang Daily.
  6. ^ Jun-Hyeok Kwak (11 June 2013). "Nationalism and Democracy Revisited" (PDF). Soongsil University.
  7. ^ a b Jang Hoon. "Liberty Korea Party, conservative populism has no future". JoongAng Ilbo. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  8. ^ Cho Soon-hyun. "Speak roughly, populist Hong Joon Pyo". InjuryTime. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  9. ^ http://www.hani.co.kr/arti/politics/assembly/898504.html
  10. ^ Lee Man-Soo. "The Liberty Korea Party has no countermeasures". Ohmynews. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  11. ^ Hwang Yong-Ho. "Jeong Mi-kyung said, "Lee Hae-chan's 240-seat remark, intended to amend socialism."". 세계일보. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  12. ^ "Hwang Kyo-ahn, "Unification of liberal right is precious thing."". JoongAng ilbo.
  13. ^ "Economic transition strategy of LKP". Liberty Korea Party.
  14. ^ http://www.ifs.or.kr/bbs/board.php?bo_table=YTT_board&wr_id=365
  15. ^ http://libertykoreaparty.kr/web/extend/card/mainCardBoardView.do?bbsId=CDB_000000001265857
  16. ^ Hong Sung Yong. "Korea party declared 'Neoconservatism'". the Korea Economic Daily. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  17. ^ Woo Jong Rok. "Hwang Kyo-ahn said, "History is failing... requiring Park Jung-hee's Spirit."". Newsis. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  18. ^ South Korea conservatives planning boycott over North Korea. United Press International. Author - Elizabeth Shim. Published 7 February 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  19. ^ South Koreans set to continue backing President Moon’s agenda in local elections. Foreign Brief. Published 13 June 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  20. ^ a b
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  23. ^ Cronin, Patrick M. (2009), Global Strategic Assessment 2009: America's Security Role in a Changing World, INSS, ISBN 9780160876554, archived from the original on January 28, 2018
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  27. ^ South Koreans set to continue backing President Moon’s agenda in local elections. Foreign Brief. Published 13 June 2018. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  28. ^ Kang, Jin-Kyu. "Gay rights get a negative spin at fourth presidential debate". Joongang Daily.
  29. ^ "Economic transition strategy of LKP". Liberty Korea Party.
  30. ^ Lee Man-Soo. "The Liberty Korea Party has no countermeasures". Ohmynews. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  31. ^ Hwang Yong-Ho. "Jeong Mi-kyung said, "Lee Hae-chan's 240-seat remark, intended to amend socialism."". 세계일보. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  32. ^ "Hwang Kyo-ahn, "Unification of liberal right is precious thing."". JoongAng ilbo.
  33. ^ "Hwang's racist comment is spreading through far-right youtubers.(In Korean)". Media Today. 1 August 2019.
  34. ^ "LKP's Homophobia(In Korean)". hankookilbo. 24 May 2019.
  35. ^ "Min Kyeon-wook, member of LKP's'coming out' comment raises dispute about Homophobia". YTN. 20 May 2019.
  36. ^ "Kimn Jin-tae "People who applied refugee status should be ousted by force."". News1. 11 July 2018.
  37. ^ "Na Kyung-won's comment about good dictatorship and bad dictatorship". JTBC. 3 May 2019.
  38. ^ "민주공화당". Archived from the original on January 29, 2013. Retrieved November 14, 2012.
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  44. ^ MoneyToday. "ѳ 153". News.mt.co.kr. Archived from the original on October 18, 2015. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  45. ^ "BBC News — Setback for South Korea's president in local elections". BBC News. June 3, 2010. Archived from the original on June 6, 2010. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  46. ^ Kim (김), Beom-hyeon (범현); Hwang Cheol-hwan (황철환) (November 21, 2011). 한나라 창당14년..탄핵후폭풍 후 최대위기. Yonhap News (in Korean). Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved November 25, 2011.
  47. ^ Kim (김), Beom-hyeon (범현) (December 3, 2011). 與, '선관위 홈피공격' 악재에 대책 부심. Yonhap News (in Korean). Archived from the original on December 7, 2011. Retrieved December 25, 2011.
  48. ^ Kim, Eun-jung (December 19, 2011). "Park Geun-hye takes helms of struggling ruling party". Yonhap News. Archived from the original on January 17, 2012. Retrieved January 5, 2012.
  49. ^ Kim, Eun-jung (January 5, 2012). "Ruling party considers shifting away from core conservative values". Yonhap News. Archived from the original on May 2, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Chung, Min-uck (January 5, 2012). "Ruling party to shed 'conservatism'". Korea Times. Archived from the original on November 4, 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2012.
  51. ^ Jun, Ji-hye (December 17, 2012). "Which colour will shine?". Korea Times. Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved December 17, 2012.
  52. ^ [2] Archived September 27, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  53. ^ "Politics". Rki.kbs.co.kr. Archived from the original on February 2, 2014. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  54. ^ "Ha Tae Kyung to Stand in Busan- Daily NK". Dailynk.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  55. ^ Paula Hancocks, CNN (11 April 2012). "North Korean defector stands for South Korean election". CNN. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  56. ^ [3][dead link]

External links[edit]