Sahifah Hammam ibn Munabbih

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Sahifah Hammam ibn Munabbih
AuthorHammam ibn Munabbih
Original titleصحيفة همام ابن منبه
LanguageArabic
GenreHadith collection

Sahifah Hammam ibn Munabbih (Arabic: صَحِيفَة هَمَّام ٱبْن مُنَبِّه) is sometimes quoted as one of the earliest surviving hadith collections compiled by Islamic scholar and Tabi‘in Hammam ibn Munabbih[1] (d. 101AH/719 or 130AH/748).[2]

Description[edit]

Generally considered in the islamic world to possibly be the oldest surviving book of hadith, it exists in various manuscript collections and printed versions are widely available.[3][4] It was first discovered and published in the 20th century by Muhammad Hamidullah.[5] This publication was a collation of two manuscript copies of Sahifa Hammam bin Munabbih, one found in a library in Damascus and the other in a library in Berlin.[4] The collection contains approximately 140 ahadith[4] all of which have an isnad (chain of narrators) The Prophet → Abū Hurayrah → Hammām → Ma‘mar → ‘Abd al-Razzāq.[6]

Hammam bin Munabbih was a disciple of Abu Hurairah from whom he relates the narrations comprising the sahifah, noting "this is what Abū Ḥurayra told us, on the authority of Muhammad the Messenger of God, peace and blessings be upon him".[7] It was generally known that the Sahifah had been completely included in the Musnad Ahmad.[citation needed]

The original manuscript for the text has been lost, but the text survives through secondary copies of it. [8]

Contested Authorship[edit]

Although most muslim scholars and some western orientalist hadith scholars confirm its attribution to Ibn Munabbih,[9] G.H.A. Juynboll argues that it was concocted by 'Abd ar-Razzaq.[10]

Publications[edit]

  • Ṣaḥı̄fat Hammām ibn Munabbih. 1st ed., edited by Rifʿat Fawzı̄ ʿAbd al‐Muṭṭalib. Cairo: Maktabat al‐Khānjı̄. (1985) [11]
  • Sahifah Hammam ibn Munabbih : the earliest extant work on the Hadith Muhammad Hamidullah tr. Muhammad Rahimuddin, Centre culturel islamique (Paris, France); 1979 [12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ G. H. A. Juynboll, Encyclopedia of canonical ḥadīth, Leiden 2007, 29.
  2. ^ Bennet, Clinton. The Bloomsbury Companion to Islamic Studies. p. 92. Scholars disagree on the date of Hammam b. Munabbih’s death. Muhammed Hamidullah, who first discovered and published the Sahifa gives the year as 101 AH/719 CE. Beeston and Dickinson follow Hamidullah in this, while Jonathan Brown gives it as 130 AH/748 CE.
  3. ^ Juynboll, G. H. A. (2007). Encyclopedia of canonical ḥadīth. Leiden. p. 29. generally considered in the Islamic world as possibly the oldest surviving book of Prophetic traditions preserved in collective volumes in various Oriental manuscript libraries and subsequently several times edited. A few editions are at the moment available everywhere in print.
  4. ^ a b c R. Marston Speight, ‘A Look at Variant Readings in the Hadith’, Der Islam, 2000, 77, 169
  5. ^ Bennet, Clinton. The Bloomsbury Companion to Islamic Studies. p. 92. Scholars disagree on the date of Hammam b. Munabbih’s death. Muhammed Hamidullah, who first discovered and published the Sahifa...
  6. ^ Juynboll, G. H. A. (2007). Encyclopedia of canonical ḥadīth. Leiden. p. 29.
  7. ^ Bennet, Clinton. The Bloomsbury Companion to Islamic Studies. p. 80.
  8. ^ Beeston, A.F.L. Arabic Literature to the End of the Umayyad Period. The original suhuf of this age unfortunately have been lost, although a few secondary copes survived. An example is the sahifah of Hammam ibn Munabbih ...
  9. ^ G. H. A. Juynboll, Encyclopedia of canonical ḥadīth, Leiden 2007, 29.
  10. ^ The one referred to as ‘Azq in the text being abbreviation for Abd ar-Razzaq, see page XIII for abbreviations. Juynboll, G. H. A. (2007). Encyclopedia of canonical ḥadīth. Leiden. p. 29. Hammam’s Sahiafa is for the main part the handiwork of none other than 'Azq
  11. ^ The Wiley Blackwell Concise Companion to the Hadith. p. 362.
  12. ^ Sahifah Hammam ibn Munabbih.