Saint Agnes Academy (Texas)

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St. Agnes Academy
Saanewbuild.jpg
St. Agnes Science Building
Address
9000 Bellaire Boulevard
Houston, Texas, (Harris County) 77036
United States
Coordinates 29°42′23″N 95°32′32″W / 29.70639°N 95.54222°W / 29.70639; -95.54222Coordinates: 29°42′23″N 95°32′32″W / 29.70639°N 95.54222°W / 29.70639; -95.54222
Information
Type Private, All-Female
Motto Latin: "Veritas"
("Truth")
Religious affiliation(s) Roman Catholic,
Dominican Order
Patron saint(s) St. Agnes of Rome
Established 1905
Authority The Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston
Superintendent Dr. Julie Vogel
Chairperson Susan Greteman
Dean Elaine Eichelberger (Dean of Students)
Principal Deborah Whalen
Head of school Sister Jane Meyer, O.P.
Grades 912
Gender Female
Enrollment 927 [1]
Average class size 19
Student to teacher ratio 12:1
Hours in school day 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Color(s) Black, Gold and White             
Athletics conference TAPPS 5A
Sports Cross Country, Volleyball, Water Polo, Basketball, Swimming, Soccer, Field Hockey, Lacrosse, Softball, Golf, Track & Field, Tennis
Mascot Tigers
Team name Tigers
Accreditation Southern Association of Colleges and Schools [2]
Average SAT scores 1710-2050 (mid 50%) (2400 scale)[3]
Average ACT scores 26-31 (mid 50%)[4]
Publication Reflections (literary magazine)
Newspaper The Columns, Veritas Magazine
Yearbook Veritas
Tuition $17,950
Website

St. Agnes Academy is a Dominican college-preparatory school for young women grades 9 through 12[5] in the Chinatown area and in the Greater Sharpstown district of Houston, Texas.[6][7] The school operates within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.[5]

History[edit]

Pauline Gannon, a Dominican Sister, founded St. Agnes Academy in 1905.[5] St. Agnes opened on February 11, 1906, at 3901 Fannin Street[5] in what is now considered to be Midtown. The school was named after Saint Agnes of Rome.[citation needed] The school was founded as a grade one through 12 school with boarding facilities.[5] The University of Texas and the Texas State Board of Education accredited St. Agnes in 1917.[5] In 1939, boarding was discontinued.[5] In 1952, St. Agnes began to serve grades nine through 12 only.[5] In 1963, the school moved from its Fannin Street location to its current location at 9000 Bellaire Boulevard in the Sharpstown area of Houston, Texas.[5] The school motto is Veritas, meaning truth.[5]

Location[edit]

In September 1963, the school moved across town to its current location at 9000 Bellaire Boulevard (near the intersection of Gessner Drive and Bellaire Boulevard).[5] St. Agnes Academy is located near Strake Jesuit College Preparatory, a Jesuit school for high school boys. The two schools hold some joint classes together, including choir and band.

Culture[edit]

In 1974 Texas Monthly stated that St. Agnes has an image of being for "older Catholic families" since many alumnae of the school sent their daughters to attend St. Agnes.[8] The magazine stated that students from both schools originated from "mostly business and professional people with money".[8]

Alumnae Association[edit]

St. Agnes Academy alumnae are a part of a network of more than 9,000 graduates as of 2011.[5] St. Agnes encourages ongoing relationships among classmates, current students and the school community, and offers a variety of ways for alumnae to get involved throughout the year. Classmates can reconnect at saaconnect.org.[citation needed]

Notable alumnae[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ SACS-CASI. "SACS-Council on Accreditation and School Improvement". Archived from the original on April 29, 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-23. 
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Our Mission & History" St. Agnes Academy. (c)2011. Retrieved July 14, 2011.
  6. ^ "c_sh_majorroads8x11.png." (Archive) Greater Sharpstown Management District. Retrieved on December 4, 2012.
  7. ^ "Chinatown." (Archive) Greater Sharpstown Management District. Retrieved on December 4, 2012. Map image, Archive
  8. ^ a b "Texas Monthly's Guide to Private Schools Part Two." Texas Monthly. Emmis Communications, October 1974. Vol. 2, No. 10. ISSN 0148-7736. Start page 83. Cited: p. 87.

External links[edit]