Saint Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Saint Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church
Stmaryofsorrows.jpg
42°54′04″N 78°50′34″W / 42.901203°N 78.842904°W / 42.901203; -78.842904Coordinates: 42°54′04″N 78°50′34″W / 42.901203°N 78.842904°W / 42.901203; -78.842904
Location938 Genesee Street, Buffalo, New York
Country United States
DenominationRoman Catholic
History
StatusCharter School
Founded1872
Architecture
Functional status"Repurposed"
Architect(s)Adolphus Druiding
StyleRhenish Romanesque Revival
Groundbreaking1886
Completed1891
Specifications
Length204 feet (62.2 m)[1]
Width104 feet (31.7 m)[1]
Height235 feet (71.6 m)[1]
Materialslocal quarried blue limestone

Saint Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church, is located at 938 Genesee Street, Buffalo, New York in the cities east side. The building is a City of Buffalo landmark and former Catholic parish church within the Diocese of Buffalo.[2]

History[edit]

Construction of the church began in 1886 and was completed in 1891.[3] The church was built for a primarily German congregation in a rhenish romanesque revival style with the floor plan laid out as a Latin cross. The church's main tower rises 235 ft (71.63 meters) high.[4] In 1985, the church was shuttered and the Catholic Diocese considered demolishing it.

Current Use[edit]

The building underwent renovations from 1986–1996 which included a new roof, repairs to bell tower, façade cleaning, and life safety systems.[2] The building is now known as the King Urban Life Center and contains the King Center Charter School. Four classrooms were built in the sanctuary space with the chancel and altar being left primarily intact.[2]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Saint Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church". emporis.com. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c "King Center Charter School: St. Mary of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church - Buffalo, NY". National Trust for Historic Preservation. June 15, 2005. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  3. ^ "www.emporis.com". January 2005. Retrieved 2011-03-17.
  4. ^ James Napora (1995). "Preservation Buffalo Niagara". Retrieved 2011-03-17.

External links[edit]