Sakinah (Fatima al-Kubra) bint Husayn

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Fatimah al-Kubra bint Al-Husayn
Baab-Sagheer.jpg
Bab al-Saghir, which contains the qabr (Arabic: قَـبـر‎, grave) of Fatimah al-Kubra.
Born 669 ACE
Medinah, Hijaz
Died 736 ACE[1]
Damascus, Ash-Sham
Burial Bab al-Saghir, City of Damascus, Syria, the Levant
Spouse Qasim ibn Hasan
Father Husayn ibn Ali

Fāṭimah al-Kubrá binṫ Al-Ḥusayn (Arabic: فَـاطِـمَـة الـكُـبـرَى بِـنـت الـحُـسَـيـن‎) was the daughter of the Islamic Imam Husayn ibn Ali. It is believed that there were two daughters of Husayn who were with him at the Battle of Karbala known by similar names: Fatimah al-Kubra ("Fatimah the Elder"), who was also called 'Sakīnah' (Arabic: سَـكِـيْـنَـة‎), and was 11 years old at that time, and Ruqayyah, who was 4 years old, who was also known as 'Sukaynah' (Arabic: سُـكَـيْـنَـة‎). Another daughter of Husayn, that is Fatimah as-Sughra, was reportedly left behind at Medinah, due to her illness.[2][3][4][5]

Marriage[edit]

According to the Shī‘ah (Arabic: شِـيـعَـة‎), her father married her to his brother Hasan's son Qasim at Karbala, due to a promise that Husayn made to him. The marriage happened just before the battle in which both Husayn and Qasim got martyred.[2][3][4][5]

There are some unsubstantiated claims about her marriage with Mus'ab Ibne Zubair, but they are perhaps unfounded considering both her age and the fact that he gave refugee to killers of her father Husayn Ibne Ali after Karbala.

Death[edit]

The grave of Fatimah al-Kubra at Bab al-Saghir.

She died in the year 736 ACE. As such, besides being a contemporary of her father and brother Ali Zaynal-Abidin, she appears to have been a contemporary of Imams Muhammad al-Baqir and Ja'far al-Sadiq.[2][3][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Story Of Sukaina Bint Al-Hussein A Muslim Heroine". Mathaba.net. 2007-05-07. Retrieved 2015-07-02. 
  2. ^ a b c "The Role of Women in Karbala". Alimoula110.com. Retrieved 2015-07-02. 
  3. ^ a b c [1] Archived October 16, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ a b c [2] Archived March 1, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ a b c "(A.S.) Network". Imamreza.net. Retrieved 2015-07-02. 

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