Saladin Ahmed

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Saladin Ahmed
Born (1975-10-04) October 4, 1975 (age 47)
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
OccupationWriter
LanguageEnglish
Alma materRutgers University (MA)
Brooklyn College (MFA)
University of Michigan (BA)
Henry Ford Community College
GenreScience fiction, fantasy, superheroes, poetry
Years active2000–present

Saladin Ahmed (born October 4, 1975) is an Eisner Award winning American comic book writer and a science fiction/fantasy poetry and prose writer. His 2012 book Throne of the Crescent Moon was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel[1][2][3] and won the Locus Award for Best First Novel.[4]

Ahmed's fiction has been published in anthologies and magazines including Strange Horizons, Orson Scott Card's InterGalactic Medicine Show, Clockwork Phoenix 2 and Beneath Ceaseless Skies. He is currently the writer of Miles Morales: Spider-Man[5] and has previously written other series for Marvel Comics such as Black Bolt, Exiles and The Magnificent Ms. Marvel.[2][6][7] He is also the co-creator of the comic series Abbott and its sequel Abbott: 1973.[8]

Early life[edit]

Ahmed was born in 1975 in Detroit, Michigan to parents of Lebanese, Egyptian, Irish, and Polish descent.[9] His father, Ismael Ahmed, formerly in the merchant marine, worked both in a factory and as a community organizer.[2] His mother was a political activist. Ahmed is Muslim.[10][11]

After graduating from high school, Ahmed attended Henry Ford Community College before transferring to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.[9] After receiving a BA in American Studies, Ahmed earned an MFA at Brooklyn College and an MA in English from Rutgers University.[12]

Career[edit]

Poetry and prose[edit]

Ahmed's poetry has been published in various literary journals and books and has been awarded fellowships from the University of Michigan, Brooklyn College, and the Bronx Council on the Arts. Ahmed's science fiction and fantasy stories have been published in magazines and anthologies including Strange Horizons, Orson Scott Card's InterGalactic Medicine Show, Clockwork Phoenix 2, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies. In 2010, he was a finalist for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer.[13]

Ahmed's story "Hooves and the Hovel of Abdel Jameela", originally published in Clockwork Phoenix 2, was a finalist for the 2010 Nebula Award for Best Short Story.[14]

In February 2012, Ahmed's debut novel, Throne of the Crescent Moon, was published by DAW Books. It was announced as the first of a trilogy.[15][16][17] The novels are fantasies inspired by One Thousand and One Nights.[18] In 2021, The Washington Post commented that "though Saladin Ahmed may be best known for his comic book work, 'Throne of the Crescent Moon,' a Middle Eastern-inspired fantasy novel, garnered him a Locus Award in 2013".[19]

In October 2017, Ahmed gained media attention for a Twitter post addressed to the cereal company Kellogg's: "why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor? this is teaching kids racism." Kellogg's indicated they would change the artwork on future Corn Pops shipments.[2][3]

Comics[edit]

In 2016, Ahmed was approached by Marvel Comics editor Wil Moss to write a series focusing on the character Black Bolt due to Ahmed's background in fantasy and science fiction.[12][20] Ahmed, with artist Christian Ward, began writing an ongoing series titled Black Bolt in May 2017.[20][21] Ahmed and Ward won the 2018 Eisner Award for Best New Series for Black Bolt[22] while the trade paperback collection of the comic, Black Bolt, Volume 1: Hard Time, was a finalist for the 2018 Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story.[23] The series was cancelled in 2018 after twelve issues.[24]

In 2018, Ahmed relaunched two new ongoing series for Marvel Comics – Miles Morales: Spider-Man with artist Javier Garron[25] and Exiles with artist Javier Rodriguez.[26] Zack Quaintance, for The Beat, called Ahmed "a rising star at Marvel, having written the critically-acclaimed Black Bolt and currently writing Miles Morales: Spider-Man and Exiles".[27] Also in 2018, Ahmed wrote the creator-owned limited series Abbott with artist Sami Kivela; it was published by Boom! Studios.[28] A sequel, titled Abbott: 1973, was released in 2021.[8]

In 2019, Ahmed and artist Minkyu Jung became the creative team for the Ms. Marvel relaunch titled The Magnificent Ms. Marvel.[7] IGN highlighted The Magnificent Ms. Marvel on its list for "Best Comic Book Series of 2019".[29] The series was cancelled in February 2021 after eighteen issues.[30] Charlie Ridgely, for ComicBook.com, highlighted that The Magnificent Ms. Marvel was "an incredible challenge" for Ahmed since he had to follow the character's original creator G. Willow Wilson. Ridgely commented that "Ahmed has leaned hard into the issues that plague our current lives while still making the comic uplifting" and that "every revelation that Kamala comes to is thoroughly earned and formed based on the specific experiences we see her confront. It's a master class in evolving a character while keeping them grounded in their own identity".[31]

Ahmed was #10 on CBR's "10 Best Marvel Comics Writers of the Last Decade" list.[32] Ahmed was nominated for "Best Comic Book Writer of 2020" by IGN — the article states that Miles Morales and Kamala Khan are "characters closely intertwined with their respective creators. It says a great deal that Saladin Ahmed has managed to take the reins of both Miles and Kamala's solo books and truly make these characters his own. Plus, he delivered a rollicking good Conan tale in Battle for the Serpent Crown".[33]

In July 2020, Ahmed and Dave Acosta successively funded an original graphic novel, titled Dragon, through Kickstarter. SyFy Wire highlighted that the Kickstarter "blew past its initial $40,000 goal and surpassed $100,000 just 10 days into the campaign".[34] In August 2021, Ahmed was one of the announced creators included in Substack's "major investment in the comics market in the form of new agreements with some of the biggest names in the medium at the moment".[35] The New York Times highlighted that "the creators will be paid by Substack while keeping ownership of their work. The company will take most of the subscription revenue in the first year; after that, it will take a 10 percent cut".[36] Ahmed stated that Substack would be the home of Copper Bottle,[35] a "subscription-based pop-up imprint publishing original comics" written by him and featuring various illustrators.[37]

In August 2021, Ahmed was among a group of creators with whom fellow comics writer Nick Spencer formed a deal with the subscription-based newsletter platform Substack to publish creator-owned comics stories, essays, and instructional guides on that platform. Ahmed indicated that he and artist Dave Acosta would collaborate on the science fiction comic Terrorwar, which is set in a future where people are forced to confront the physical manifestation of their fears.[38]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Work Result Ref.
2009 Harper's Pen Award Best Sword and Sorcery/Heroic Fantasy Short Story "Where Virtue Lives" Finalist [39][40]
2010 Nebula Award Best Short Story "Hooves and the Hovel of Abdel Jameela" Finalist [14]
2010 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer Finalist [41]
2011 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer Finalist[a] [41]
2012 Nebula Award Best Novel Throne of the Crescent Moon Finalist [42][3]
2013 Hugo Award Best Novel Throne of the Crescent Moon Finalist [1][2]
2013 Locus Award Best First Novel Throne of the Crescent Moon Won [4]
2018 Eisner Award Best New Series Black Bolt (2017) Won [22]
2018 Hugo Award Best Graphic Story Black Bolt, Volume 1: Hard Time Finalist [23][43]
2019 Hugo Award Best Graphic Story Abbott Finalist [44][45]
2020 Dragon Awards Best Graphic Novel Black Bolt Finalist [46]
2022 Ignyte Awards Best Comics Team Abbott: 1973 Nominated [47]

Works[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Throne of the Crescent Moon (DAW Books, 2012, ISBN 978-0-7564-0778-0)

Comics and graphic novels[edit]

Marvel Comics[edit]

  • Black Bolt #1-12 (with Christian Ward, ongoing, 2017–2018)[6]
  • Exiles #1-12 (with Javier Rodriguez, ongoing, 2018–2019)
  • Quicksilver: No Surrender #1-5 (with Eric Nguyen, limited series, 2018)[53]
  • Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 (with Garry Brown, one-shot, September 2018)[55]
  • Miles Morales: Spider-Man #1-ongoing (with various artists, ongoing, 2018–present)
    • Miles Morales Vol. 1: Straight Out Of Brooklyn (with Javier Garrón, collects #1-6, trade paperback, July 2019, ISBN 978-1-302-91478-3)[56]
    • Miles Morales Vol. 2: Bring On The Bad Guys (with writer Tom Taylor and artists Alitha E. Martinez, Javier Garrón, Vanesa Del Rey, Ron Ackins, Cory Smith, collects #7-10 and Free Comic Book Day 2019 Spider-Man/Venom #1, trade paperback, July 2019, ISBN 978-1-302-91478-3)[57]
    • Miles Morales: Spider-Man Vol. 3: Family Business (with Ray-Anthony Height, Kevin Libranda, Belen Ortega, Javier Garrón, Ze Carlos, Alitha E. Martinez, Ig Guara, collects #11-15, trade paperback, July 2020, ISBN 978-1-302-92016-6)[58]
    • Miles Morales Vol. 4: Ultimatum (with Carmen Carnero, Cory Smith, Marcelo Ferreira, collects #16-21, trade paperback, February 2021, ISBN 978-1-302-92017-3)[59]
    • Miles Morales Vol. 5: The Clone Saga (with writer Cody Ziglar and artists Natacha Bustos, Carmen Carnero, collects #22-28, trade paperback, September 2021, ISBN 978-1-302-92601-4)[60]
    • Miles Morales Vol. 6: All Eyes On Me (with Christopher Allen, Carmen Carnero, collects #29-32, trade paperback, January 2022, ISBN 978-1-302-92602-1)[61]
    • Miles Morales Vol. 7: Beyond (with Christopher Allen, Michele Bandini, collects #33-36 and Miles Morales: Spider-Man Annual #1, trade paperback, June 2022, ISBN 9781302932657)[62] [upcoming]
  • The Magnificent Ms. Marvel #1-18 (with various artists, ongoing, 2019–2021)
    • Ms. Marvel by Saladin Ahmed Vol. 1: Destined (with Minkyu Jung, collects #1-6, trade paperback, October 2019, ISBN 978-1-302-91829-3)[63]
    • Ms. Marvel By Saladin Ahmed Vol. 2: Stormranger (with Minkyu Jung, Joey Vazquez, collects #7-12, trade paperback, April 2020, ISBN 978-1-302-91830-9)[64]
    • Ms. Marvel by Saladin Ahmed Vol. 3: Outlawed (with Joey Vazquez, Minkyu Jung, collects #13-18, trade paperback, May 2021, ISBN 978-1-302-92500-0)[65]
  • Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales #1-3 (with Federico Vicentini, limited series, 2019)
    • Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales (with writer Jed Mackay and artists Stefano Raffaele, Federico Vicentini, collects #1-3 and Absolute Carnage: Weapon Plus #1, trade paperback, September 2021, ISBN 978-1-302-92014-2)[66]
  • Conan: Battle For The Serpent Crown #1-5 (with Luke Ross, limited series, 2019)
  • Wolverine: Black, White & Blood #2 (with writers Chris Claremont, Vita Ayala and artists Salvador Larroca, Greg Land, Kev Walker, limited series, 2020)[68]

Creator-owned[edit]

  • Abbott #1-5 (with Sami Kivela, limited series, 2018)[2]
  • Abbott: 1973 #1-5 (with Sami Kivela, limited series, 2021)[70]
  • Dragon (with Dave Acosta, self-published graphic novel, 2022)

DC Comics[edit]

Collections[edit]

  • Engraved on the Eye (Ridan Publishing, 2012)

Short stories[edit]

  • Star Wars: Canto Bight - "Rules of the Game" (Del Rey, December 2017)
  • "Without Faith, Without Law, Without Joy" - Rags & Bones, ed. By Melissa Marr, Tim Pratt (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, October 2013)
  • "Amethyst, Shadow, and Light" - Fearsome Journeys, ed. Jonathan Strahan (Solaris, May 2013)
  • "The Faithful Soldier, Prompted" - Apex Magazine 18, November 2010
podcast by StarShipSofa
podcast by DrabbleCast
podcast by PodCastle

Poetry[edit]

Ahmed's poetry has appeared in the following journals and anthologies:

  • Callaloo Volume 32, Issue 4 (2009)
  • Against Agamemnon: War Poetry (WaterWood Press 2009)
  • Inclined to Speak: An Anthology of Contemporary Arab American Poetry (University of Arkansas Press 2008)
  • Margie: The American Journal of Poetry Volume 6 (2007)
  • We Begin Here: Poems for Palestine and Lebanon (Interlink Books 2007)
  • The Brooklyn Review #19 (2002)
  • The Brooklyn Review #18 (2001)
  • Big City Lit (2001)
  • Mizna Volume 3, Issue 1 (2001)
  • Abandon Automobile: Detroit City Poetry (Wayne State University Press 2001)
  • Post Gibran: Anthology of New Arab American Writing' (Kitab/Syracuse University Press 2000)
  • Arab Detroit: From Margin to Mainstream (Wayne State University Press 2000)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2013 Hugo Award Nominations". December 22, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Cavna, Michael (October 26, 2017). "Kellogg's will change its Corn Pops box after author says it teaches 'kids racism'". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Smith, Aaron (October 26, 2017). "Kellogg's gets rid of racially insensitive art on Corn Pops box". CNN.com. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Locus Awards Winners", Locus, June 29, 2013.
  5. ^ "Miles Morales Is Getting Back to His Spider-Man Roots in a New Series Written by Saladin Ahmed". Gizmodo. September 14, 2018. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  6. ^ a b Krug, Kurt Anthony (May 1, 2017). "Award-winning Oak Park author tries his hand at Marvel Comics' 'Black Bolt'". Oakland Press.
  7. ^ a b "The Magnificent Ms. Marvel Launches in 2019 with a New Creative Team". pastemagazine.com. December 14, 2018. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  8. ^ a b "BOOM! Studios' Abbott 1973 Vol. 1 Comic Review". CBR. October 19, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  9. ^ a b "Biography", Saladin Ahmed (saladinahmed.com), archived November 15, 2010, accessed December 2, 2010.
  10. ^ Saladin Ahmed [@saladinahmed] (December 25, 2017). "as an American from a mixed family I love commercial Christmas. but also as a Muslim I love Jesus's message. here's a bit that helps explain why. MERRY CHRISTMAS! t.co/t7NiuhTTAb" (Tweet). Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2019 – via Twitter.
  11. ^ Saladin Ahmed [@saladinahmed] (January 18, 2016). "As a Muslim I find it fascinating that we talk about patriarchy re: Hillary but not Christian supremacy re: Bernie" (Tweet). Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved January 1, 2019 – via Twitter.
  12. ^ a b Dunn, Patrick (September 3, 2020). "The Magnificent Mr. Marvel: Saladin Ahmed — SEEN Magazine". SEEN Magazine. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  13. ^ "2010 Hugo Awards Winners". Locus, September 5, 2010, accessed December 2, 2010.
  14. ^ a b "2009 SFWA Nebula Awards Final Ballot", Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Inc. (SFWA), accessed December 2, 2010. Archived February 19, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ Penguin Group Throne of the Crescent Moon page
  16. ^ "THRONE OF THE CRESCENT MOON is now on sale!", Saladin Ahmed, February 7, 2012.
  17. ^ "People and Publishing", Locus, September 2010, p. 8.
  18. ^ "YEE-HAW! I've signed with DAW!", Saladin Ahmed (saladinahmed.com), accessed December 2, 2010.[page needed]
  19. ^ Moreno-Garcia, Silvia; Tidhar, Lavie (September 18, 2021). "Perspective: Let's talk about the best sword and sorcery books". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  20. ^ a b "INTERVIEW: Inhumans' Black Bolt Is Sent to Cosmic Prison - with the Absorbing Man". CBR. March 29, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  21. ^ "The Story of How Black Bolt Met Lockjaw Is Heartwarming and Heartbreaking". Gizmodo. September 6, 2017. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  22. ^ a b "2018 MONSTRESS, BLACK PANTHER, AND BLACK BOLT WIN BIG AT THE 2018 EISNER AWARDS". SyFy. July 21, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2019.
  23. ^ a b "2018 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. March 15, 2018. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  24. ^ Johnston, Rich (February 22, 2018). "Iron Fist and Black Bolt Missing Presumed Cancelled - What About Thanos?". Bleeding Cool News And Rumors. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  25. ^ Terror, Jude (September 13, 2018). "Saladin Ahmed and Javier Garron Launch a New Miles Morales: Spider-Man in December". Bleeding Cool News And Rumors. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  26. ^ Holub, Christian (January 19, 2018). "Breaking down Marvel's new 'Exiles,' from cartoon Wolverine to 'Ragnarok' Valkyrie". EW.com. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  27. ^ Quaintance, Zack (December 14, 2018). "THE MAGNIFICENT MS. MARVEL: Kamala Khan gets new comic, new creative team, new adjective". The Beat. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  28. ^ Holub, Christian (January 23, 2018). "Saladin Ahmed previews his new '70s paranormal investigator comic 'Abbott'". EW.com. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  29. ^ Yehl, Joshua (December 5, 2019). "Best Comic Book Series of 2019". IGN. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  30. ^ "Exclusive preview of Saladin Ahmed and Minkyu Jung's big 'Magnificent Ms. Marvel' finale". SYFY Official Site. January 29, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  31. ^ "The Magnificent Ms. Marvel #18 Review: A Most Magnificent Finale". ComicBook.com. February 24, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  32. ^ "10 Best Marvel Comics Writers of the Last Decade". CBR. December 23, 2019. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  33. ^ Schedeen, Jesse (December 15, 2020). "Best Comic Book Writer of 2020". IGN. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  34. ^ "Saladin Ahmed's Kickstarter success Dragon connects the past to the present through Dracula". SYFY Official Site. July 31, 2020. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  35. ^ a b "Exclusive: Saladin Ahmed opens up about moving to Substack, his Copper Bottle imprint, and debut series 'Terrorwar'". SYFY Official Site. August 11, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  36. ^ Gustines, George Gene (August 9, 2021). "Comic Book Writers and Artists Follow Other Creators to Substack". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  37. ^ Ahmed, Saladin (January 31, 2022). "Welcome to Copper Bottle!". www.copperbottle.net. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  38. ^ Gustines, George Gene (August 9, 2021). "Comic Book Writers and Artists Follow Other Creators to Substack". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 9, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  39. ^ The Nebula Awards Showcase 2011. Kevin J. Anderson. New York: Tor. 2011. p. 36. ISBN 978-1-4299-7221-5. OCLC 865172594.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  40. ^ "John C. Hocking's "The Face in the Sea" nominated for Harper's Pen Award – Black Gate". Black Gate. March 25, 2010. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  41. ^ a b "Astounding Award". The Hugo Awards. August 9, 2007. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  42. ^ "2012 Nebula Award Nominees Announced", SFWA, accessed February 23, 2013.
  43. ^ Cavna, Michael (April 2, 2018). "Hugo Award nomination bodes well for breakout 'Monsters' author Emil Ferris". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  44. ^ Liptak, Andrew (April 2, 2019). "Here are the 2019 Hugo Award nominees". The Verge. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  45. ^ "2019 Hugo and Campbell Awards Winners". Locus Online. August 19, 2019. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  46. ^ "2020 Dragon Awards Winners". Locus Online. September 8, 2020. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  47. ^ "Check Out These Fire 2022 Ignyte Nominees!". The Mary Sue. April 22, 2022. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  48. ^ "Black Bolt Vol. 1: Hard Time (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  49. ^ "Black Bolt Vol. 2: Home Free (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  50. ^ "Black Bolt (Hardcover)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  51. ^ "EXILES VOL. 1: TEST OF TIME TPB (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  52. ^ "Exiles Vol. 2: The Trial Of The Exiles (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  53. ^ Levin, Elana (June 13, 2018). "Review: Quicksilver: No Surrender is another bold, experimental success for Saladin Ahmed". The Beat. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  54. ^ "Quicksilver: No Surrender (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  55. ^ "Amazing Spider-Man Annual (2018) #1 | Comic Issues | Marvel". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  56. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 1: Straight Out Of Brooklyn (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  57. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 2: Bring On The Bad Guys (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  58. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 3: Family Business (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  59. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 4: Ultimatum (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  60. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 5: The Clone Saga (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  61. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 6: All Eyes On Me (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  62. ^ "Miles Morales Vol. 7: Beyond|Paperback". Barnes & Noble. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  63. ^ "Ms. Marvel by Saladin Ahmed Vol. 1: Destined (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  64. ^ "Ms. Marvel By Saladin Ahmed Vol. 2: Stormranger (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  65. ^ "Ms. Marvel by Saladin Ahmed Vol. 3: Outlawed (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  66. ^ "Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  67. ^ "Conan: Battle For The Serpent Crown (Trade Paperback)". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  68. ^ "Wolverine: Black, White & Blood (2020) #2 | Comic Issues | Marvel". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved May 9, 2022.
  69. ^ Abbott. October 30, 2018. ISBN 978-1-68415-245-2.
  70. ^ McMillan, Graeme (October 13, 2020). "Supernatural Crime Comic Abbott: 1973 in the Works". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 8, 2022.
  71. ^ Abbott: 1973. October 12, 2021. ISBN 978-1-68415-651-1.
  72. ^ "Harley Quinn: Black + White + Red #3 Reviews". ComicBookRoundup.com. Retrieved November 15, 2022.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Finalist in their 2nd year of eligibility

External links[edit]