Saleh bin Abdul-Aziz Al ash-Sheikh

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Saleh bin Abdul-Aziz Al ash-Sheikh
Minister of Islamic Affairs, Endowments, Call and Guidance
In office
1996 – 8 December 2014
Succeeded by Suleiman bin Abdullah Aba Al Khail
Personal details
Nationality Saudi
Alma mater Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University
Website http://saleh.af.org.sa/

Saleh bin Abdul-Aziz Al ash-Sheikh (born in 1959, Riyadh) is a Saudi cleric who served as the minister of Islamic affairs, endowments, call and guidance of Saudi Arabia between 1996 and 2014, and again since 2015.[1] He is a member of the Al ash-Sheikh, the influential Saudi religious family.

Background and career[edit]

Saleh bin Abdul-Aziz Al ash-Sheikh is a member of a noted family of Saudi religious scholars, the Al ash-Sheikh. The Sheikh is well known for his studies of the fatwas of his grandfather, Sheikh Muhammad bin Ibrahim.[2] He is a graduate from Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University in Riyadh, from the Faculty of Fundamentals of Islamic Religion[3] and wrote several books on various topics of Islamic Sciences.[4]

He has been minister of Islamic affairs, endowments, call and guidance since 1996 and was appointed the first official mufti in 1954.[5] His term as minister of Islamic affairs, endowments, call and guidance ended on 8 December 2014 when Suleiman bin Abdullah Aba Al Khail replaced him in the post,[6] but only for a short time. He was re-appointed in February 2015.[7]

In July 2016, he met with the Minister of Civil Affairs of Bosnia, Adil Osmanovic, to discuss possible cooperation in educational reforms and investments in culture, economic development, and infrastructure. During the same month, the Sheikh met with Pakistani Minister of Religious Affairs and Inter-faith Harmony Sardar Mohammed Yousaf to strengthen the ties between Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.[8]

In July 2017, Ash-Sheik called upon Qatar to change the name of the main mosque in Doha, the mosque Imam Abdul Wahaab, claiming that the Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, then the Emir of Qatar, had wrongly claimed himself as a descendant of Imam Abdul Wahaab.[9] In January 2018, Ash-Sheikh called for the defense of a Muslim Jerusalem, and publicly stated his support for the Palestinian cause.[10]

Religious work[edit]

He is upon the Sunni Salafi school of thought in Islam,[11] and wrote extensively on Islamic faith and practice. In his essay This is Islam, he explains in detail Islam's role in daily life, particularly in the realms of Aqidah (referring to matters which are believed wholeheartedly and with conviction), worship, Sharia (Islamic Law), system of government, morals, wealth and economy activity, international relations, civilization, disagreement and dialogue, and moderation.[12]

In Islamic Principles for the Muslim's Attitude During Fitan (Trials, Tribulations, Afflictions, and Calamities), the Sheikh describes the best practices for Muslims when faced with strife and conflict. He lays out nine principles to be used in such moments, which pertain to ways of conducting oneself, as well as general guidelines which must be respected.[13]

Saleh bin Abdul-Aziz Al ash-Sheikh also wrote Clarification of Some Common Mistakes in which the chapter 40 Common Mistakes in Salaat [Prayer] outlines common mistakes performed during the Islamic prayer and how to rectify them, including body positioning and recitations.[14]

Publications[edit]

  • Islamic Principles for the Muslim’s Attitude During Fitan (Trials, Tribulations, Afflictions, and Calamities), Quran Sunnah Educational Programs, 1411 Hijri/October 1990
  • Clarification of Some Common Mistakes, 1413 Hijri/1992
  • Explanation The Book of Tawheed, 1424 Hijri/2003
  • Explanation of the Four Fundamentals, 1433 Hijri/2014

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biographies of Ministers". Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, Washington, DC. Archived from the original on 16 June 2011. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  2. ^ ترجمة موجزة لفضيلة الشيخ صالح بن عبد العزيز آل الشيخ, Ajurry.com
  3. ^ "ترجمة الشيخ صالح بن عبدالعزيز آل الشيخ حفظه الله". majles.alukah.net (in Arabic). Retrieved 2017-01-31.
  4. ^ "نبذة عن الشيخ | موقع الشيخ صالح ال الشيخ". saleh.af.org.sa. Archived from the original on 2016-12-30. Retrieved 2017-01-31.
  5. ^ Baamir, Abdulrahman Yahya (2010). Shari'a Law in Commercial and Banking Arbitration. p. 29 (n. 87). ISBN 978-1-4094-0377-7.
  6. ^ "King Abdullah names new ministers". Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, Washington DC. 8 December 2014. Archived from the original on 16 December 2014. Retrieved 11 December 2014.
  7. ^ http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/saudi-arabia/mohammad-bin-nayef-takes-leading-role-in-saudi-arabia-1.1458374
  8. ^ BiH and Saudi Arabia to strengthen the Cooperation in the field of Education, Sarajevotimes.com, 29 July 2016
  9. ^ Mattia Tomba, Insight 171: Developments in the Middle East Insight Series-Qatar and the Quartet (Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt), Mus .edu.sg, 26 September 2017
  10. ^ Awqaf Minister: ‘Defending Jerusalem Is a Duty’, Aawsat.com, 18 January 2015
  11. ^ "ترجمة موجزة لفضيلة الشيخ صالح بن عبد العزيز آل الشيخ". www.ajurry.com. Retrieved 2017-01-31.
  12. ^ This Is Islam, Islamkorea.com
  13. ^ Islamic Principles for the Muslim’s Attitude during Fita, Islamkorea.com
  14. ^ 40 Common Mistakes in Salaat, Islamkorea.com