Salgado Filho Porto Alegre International Airport

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Salgado Filho International Airport

Aeroporto Internacional Salgado Filho
Porto Alegre airport logo.svg
Aeroporto Salgado Filho - panoramio.jpg
Summary
Airport typePublic
Operator
ServesPorto Alegre
Focus city forAzul Brazilian Airlines
Time zoneTime in Brazil (UTC−03:00)
Elevation AMSL4 m / 13 ft
Coordinates29°59′41″S 051°10′16″W / 29.99472°S 51.17111°W / -29.99472; -51.17111Coordinates: 29°59′41″S 051°10′16″W / 29.99472°S 51.17111°W / -29.99472; -51.17111
Websiteportoalegre-airport.com.br/en/
Map
POA is located in Brazil
POA
POA
Location in Brazil
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
11/29 3,200 10,499 Asphalt
Statistics (2021)
Passengers4,803,176 Increase 38%
Aircraft Operations49,278 Increase 30%
Metric tonnes of cargo19,424 Increase 33%
Statistics: Fraport[1]
Sources: Airport Website,[2] ANAC[3]

Salgado Filho Porto Alegre International Airport (IATA: POA, ICAO: SBPA) is the airport serving Porto Alegre and the region of Greater Porto Alegre, Brazil. It is named after the Senator and first Minister of the Brazilian Air Force Joaquim Pedro Salgado Filho (1888–1950).

It is operated by Fraport Brasil.[4]

History[edit]

Salgado Filho was originally called São João Federal Airport, after the neighborhood where it is located. In the beginning it was an air club, where the first flights landed on May 31, 1923.

In 1932, needing a facility to use its aircraft with landing-gear which were replacing its seaplanes, Varig started using São João Airport as its operational base. However, it was only in 1940 that the first passenger terminal was commissioned.[5]

On October 12, 1951, São João Federal Airport was renamed Salgado Filho Airport, after the Senator and Minister who died the year before on a crash involving a SAVAG aircraft that departed from Porto Alegre.

In 1953 the old terminal was incorporated into the maintenance facilities of Varig, a new passenger terminal was opened, and runways were paved.[5] Until that year larger aircraft such as Lockheed L-049 Constellations had to land at Canoas Air Force Base.[6] This new terminal is known today as Passenger Terminal 2. It underwent major renovations and enlargements between 1969 and 1971 but unable to cope with the increasing traffic, another brand new facility was built. This new facility was named Passenger Terminal 1 and opened on September 11, 2001. Terminal 2 became underused by general aviation and cargo services.

However, in order to cope with the increasing passenger traffic at the airport, on September 8, 2010 a decision was made to renovate Terminal 2 and bring it back into passenger use.[7] It became operational on December 4, 2010.[8] This terminal 2 was again closed for air traffic on September 15, 2019 and it became the administration center of Fraport Brasil S.A.- Aeroporto de Porto Alegre.[9]

Previously operated by Infraero, in January 2018, the airport's operations and administration were taken over by the German private airport operator Fraport, which in the previous year had been the winning bidder in an B3 (stock exchange) auction conducted by the Brazilian government for the concession of the airport for 25 years.[10][11] Since the airport concession, Fraport has been expanding the runway from the current 2,280 meters (7,481 ft) to 3,200 meters (10,499 ft), allowing the landing of large aircraft and allowing the landing of flights from North America and Europe. It is expected that the expansion works will be concluded at the end of 2021.[12]

The total area of the Salgado Filho Airport is about 3,805,810 square metres (40,965,400 sq ft) with 14,750 square metres (158,800 sq ft) of ramp area. Terminal 1 has 37,600 square metres (405,000 sq ft) and 16 gates with jetways. Terminal 2 has 15,540 square metres (167,300 sq ft). In front of Terminal 1 there is a carpark with 1,440 places. Terminal 1 is the first facility in Latin America with a shopping mall.

One of the two TAP Maintenance & Engineering centers in Brazil is located at Salgado Filho International Airport.

As of May 2022, the airport's expanded 3,200 m (10,499 ft) runway began to come into operation. With the runway expansion, larger aircraft such as the Boeing 747-400, Boeing 777-300 and Airbus 330-900 can operate at the airport, allowing direct flights to Europe and the United States.[13]

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Passenger[edit]

AirlinesDestinations
Aerolíneas Argentinas Buenos Aires–Aeroparque
Azul Brazilian Airlines Belo Horizonte–Confins, Campinas, Cuiabá, Curitiba, Florianópolis, Foz do Iguaçu, Londrina, Maceió, Maringá, Montevideo, Navegantes, Pelotas, Porto Seguro, Punta del Este, Recife, Rio de Janeiro–Santos Dumont, Santa Maria, Santo Ângelo, São Paulo–Guarulhos, Uberlândia, Uruguaiana
Seasonal: Fortaleza, Salvador da Bahia
Azul Conecta Alegrete, Bagé, Canela, Curitiba, Erechim, Santa Cruz do Sul, Santa Rosa, Vacaria
Seasonal: Torres
Copa Airlines Panama City–Tocumen
Flybondi Seasonal Charter: San Carlos de Bariloche
Gol Transportes Aéreos Belo Horizonte–Confins, Brasília, Curitiba, Florianópolis, Fortaleza, Maceió, Natal, Navegantes, Recife, Rio de Janeiro–Santos Dumont, Salvador da Bahia, São Paulo–Congonhas, São Paulo–Guarulhos
LATAM Brasil Brasília, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro–Santos Dumont, São Paulo–Congonhas, São Paulo–Guarulhos
LATAM Perú Lima
TAP Air Portugal Lisbon

Cargo[edit]

AirlinesDestinations
Azul Brazilian Airlines Campinas, São Paulo–Guarulhos
Total Linhas Aéreas São Paulo-Guarulhos

Statistics[edit]

Annual passenger traffic at POA airport. See source Wikidata query.

Access[edit]

The airport is located 9 km (6 mi) from downtown Porto Alegre.

Since August 10, 2013, the Metro-Airport Connection people mover connects the International Airport to the Porto Alegre Metro Airport Station.[14] From this metro station one can reach most cities of the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre. Bus routes T5, T11, and B09 link Terminal 1 - International Airport to the city of Porto Alegre.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Movimentação Aeroportuária". Porto Alegre Airport (in Portuguese). Retrieved 5 May 2022.
  2. ^ "Porto Alegre Airport". Fraport. Retrieved 5 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Aeródromos". ANAC (in Portuguese). 29 June 2020. Retrieved 19 April 2021.
  4. ^ Farina, Erik (16 March 2017). "Grupo alemão vence leilão e assume aeroporto Salgado Filho por 25 anos". GZH (in Brazilian Portuguese). Retrieved 26 July 2021.
  5. ^ a b Beting, Gianfranco; Beting, Joelmir (2009). Varig: Eterna Pioneira (in Portuguese). Porto Alegre and São Paulo: EDIPUCRS and Beting Books. p. 35. ISBN 978-85-7430-901-9.
  6. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Está faltando um". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. p. 96. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  7. ^ "Reformulação do antigo terminal do Aeroporto Salgado Filho é antecipada" (in Portuguese). Zero Hora. September 8, 2010. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved September 15, 2010.
  8. ^ Andrade, Artur Luiz (December 1, 2010). "Webjet utiliza terminal 2 do Salgado Filho (RS)" (in Portuguese). Panrotas. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved December 1, 2010.
  9. ^ "Porto Alegre Airport concentra operações de todas as companhias aéreas em um só Terminal" (PDF). Porto Alegre Airport (in Portuguese). 4 September 2019. Retrieved 17 September 2019.
  10. ^ "Aeroporto Internacional - Porto Alegre - RS" [International Airport - Porto Alegre - RS] (in Portuguese). Infraero. Archived from the original on 2018-03-23. Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  11. ^ "Fraport - Porto Alegre Airport". Fraport Porto Alegre. Archived from the original on 2018-03-23. Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  12. ^ "Prefeitura de Porto Alegre deve agilizar remoção de famílias da Vila Nazaré". Correio do Povo (in Brazilian Portuguese). Retrieved 21 April 2021.
  13. ^ Oliveira, Bruna (19 May 2022). "No aguardo das grandes aeronaves, expectativa é impulsionar exportações após ampliação da pista do aeroporto de Porto Alegre". GZH (in Brazilian Portuguese). Retrieved 20 May 2022.
  14. ^ "G1 - Com a presença de Dilma, aeromóvel é inaugurado em Porto Alegre - notícias em Rio Grande do Sul". Rio Grande do Sul. Archived from the original on 2013-08-13. Retrieved 2013-08-18.
  15. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve História da Aviação Comercial Brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa. p. 75.
  16. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Verão de 1942". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 42–48. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  17. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve História da Aviação Comercial Brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa. p. 76.
  18. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O Electra e o temporal". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 61–65. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  19. ^ "Accident description PP-VBI". Aviation Safety Network. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2011.
  20. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Fogo a bordo". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 83–86. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  21. ^ "Accident description PP-SAA". Aviation Safety Network. Archived from the original on January 28, 2012. Retrieved August 15, 2011.
  22. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Salgado Filho". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 102–107. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  23. ^ "Accident description PP-AXJ". Aviation Safety Network. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  24. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Erro de navegação". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928-1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 112–117. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2.
  25. ^ "Accident description PP-VCS". Aviation Safety Network. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  26. ^ "Incident description PP-VJL". Aviation Safety Network. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved August 16, 2011.

Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website https://www.afhra.af.mil/.

External links[edit]

Media related to Salgado Filho International Airport at Wikimedia Commons