Salidroside

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Salidroside
Salidroside.png
Names
IUPAC name
2-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)ethyl β-D-glucopyranoside
Other names
Salidroside
Rhodioloside
(2R,3S,4S,5R,6R)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-6-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethoxy]oxane-3,4,5-triol
Tyrosol glucoside
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.224.258
UNII
Properties
C14H20O7
Molar mass 300.31 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Salidroside (rhodioloside) is a glucoside of tyrosol found in the plant Rhodiola rosea.[1] It has been studied, along with rosavin, as one of the potential compounds responsible for the putative antidepressant and anxiolytic actions of this plant.[2][3] Salidroside may be more active than rosavin,[4] even though many commercially marketed Rhodiola rosea extracts are standardized for rosavin content rather than salidroside.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mao, Y; Li, Y; Yao, N (2007). "Simultaneous determination of salidroside and tyrosol in extracts of Rhodiola L. By microwave assisted extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography". Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. 45 (3): 510–5. doi:10.1016/j.jpba.2007.05.031. PMID 17628386.
  2. ^ Perfumi, Marina; Mattioli, Laura (2007). "Adaptogenic and central nervous system effects of single doses of 3% rosavin and 1% salidroside Rhodiola rosea L. Extract in mice". Phytotherapy Research. 21 (1): 37–43. doi:10.1002/ptr.2013. PMID 17072830.
  3. ^ Mattioli, L.; Funari, C.; Perfumi, M. (2008). "Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. Extract on behavioural and physiological alterations induced by chronic mild stress in female rats". Journal of Psychopharmacology. 23 (2): 130–142. doi:10.1177/0269881108089872. PMID 18515456.
  4. ^ Panossian, A.; Nikoyan, N.; Ohanyan, N.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Abrahamyan, H.; Gabrielyan, E.; Wikman, G. (2008). "Comparative study of Rhodiola preparations on behavioral despair of rats". Phytomedicine. 15 (1–2): 84–91. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2007.10.003. PMID 18054474.