Salim Khan family

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Salim Khan family
Current regionMumbai, India
Members
TraditionsIslam, Hinduism, Christianity[1]
Estate(s)Galaxy Apartments, Bandra
Arpita Farms, Panvel
Active since 1959, for nearly 60 years.

The Salim Khan family refers to the family of Salim Khan which is a prominent Indian show business family, and is one of the prominent Bollywood film clans. Multiple members of the family have been actors, screenwriters, film directors and producers in the Hindi film industry of India. Salim Khan, one half of the duo Salim-Javed, is one the most famous screenwriters in the history of Indian cinema. His son, actor Salman Khan, has been the prominent face of the family since the 1990s, as one of the three biggest Bollywood movie stars.

Salim Khan was born in 1935 in Indore in the Central Provinces and Berar in British India. His father was an immigrant from iran who migrated and settled in Indore (now in Madhya Pradesh). The family also has roots in Jammu and Kashmir, from the father of Salma Khan (born Sushila Charak), wife of Salim Khan. Some members of the family also have roots in Kerala ( ex wife of Arbaaz Khan Malaika Arora), Punjab (Atul Agnihotri), and Burma (Helen).[2][3][4]

Generations[edit]

First generation[edit]

Second generation[edit]

Contributions[edit]

Salim Khan[edit]

Salim Khan was a screenwriter, who wrote the screenplays, stories and scripts for numerous Bollywood films. In Hindi cinema, Khan is best known for being one half of the prolific screenwriting duo Salim-Javed, along with Javed Akhtar. The duo Salim-Javed were the first Indian screenwriters to achieve star status,[5] becoming the most successful Indian screenwriters of all time,[6] and are regarded as "Hindi cinema's greatest screenwriters".[7]

Salim-Javed revolutionized Indian cinema in the 1970s,[8] transforming and reinventing the Bollywood formula, pioneering the Bollywood blockbuster format,[7] and pioneering genres such as the masala film[9] and the Dacoit Western.[10] Salim Khan was also responsible for creating the "angry young man" character archetype and launching Amitabh Bachchan's career.[11] Salim-Javed won six Filmfare Awards, and their films are among the highest-grossing Indian films of all time, including Sholay (1975), the highest-grossing Indian film ever at the time, as well as films such as Seeta Aur Geeta (1972), Zanjeer (1973), Deewaar (1975), Kranti (1981), and the Don franchise.

Salman Khan[edit]

Salman Khan, ever since the blockbuster Maine Pyar Kiya (1989), has been known for being one of the three biggest movie stars of Bollywood since the 1990s, along with Aamir Khan and Shah Rukh Khan, collectively known as the three Khans of Bollywood. He is often known for starring in blockbuster masala films, a genre that was originally pioneered by his father Salim Khan.[3]

Arbaaz Khan[edit]

Arbaaz Khan, ever since the blockbuster Daraar (1996). He is often known for starring in blockbuster masala films, a genre that was originally pioneered by his father Salim Khan.

Sohail Khan[edit]

Sohail Khan, the youngest of the Khan brothers, produces films under his banner Sohail Khan Productions. He has appeared on the TV show Comedy Circus as one of the judges. He is known for his films Jai Ho (2014), Pyaar Kiya To Darna Kya (1998) and Hello Brother.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Salman Khan's heart-warming family story". Emirates 24/7. 25 July 2015.
  2. ^ a b Salman Khan grandfather is from Afghanistan ... Retrieved 1 October 2014. Salman Khan: "My grandfather from Afghanistan... My grandfather from my mother's side comes from Jammu Kashmir..."
  3. ^ a b "Salman's 'Khan'daan: The Salim Khan Family Tree". www.news18.com. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Meet: The complete Salim Khan family | News - Times of India Videos". The Times of India. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  5. ^ Ramesh Dawar (2003), Encyclopaedia of Hindi cinema, Encyclopædia Britannica (India) Pvt. Ltd.
  6. ^ Sholay, through the eyes of Salim Khan, [1],Rediff.com
  7. ^ a b Chaudhuri, Diptakirti (1 October 2015). Written by Salim-Javed: The Story of Hindi Cinema's Greatest Screenwriters. Penguin UK. ISBN 9789352140084.
  8. ^ "Salim-Javed: Writing Duo that Revolutionized Indian Cinema". Pandolin. 25 April 2013.
  9. ^ Chaudhuri, Diptakirti (1 October 2015). Written by Salim-Javed: The Story of Hindi Cinema's Greatest Screenwriters. Penguin UK. p. 58. ISBN 9789352140084.
  10. ^ Teo, Stephen (2017). Eastern Westerns: Film and Genre Outside and Inside Hollywood. Taylor & Francis. p. 122. ISBN 9781317592266.
  11. ^ "Why Salim Khan was angry with Amitabh Bachchan". The Times of India. 13 December 2013.