Sally Brown

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Sally Brown
Peanuts character
Sally Brown.png
Sally in the Sunday comics strips, where she had a pink polka-dot dress.
First appearanceMay 26, 1959 (born and first mention)
August 23, 1959 (official debut)
Last appearanceFebruary 6, 2000 (comic strip)
Created byCharles M. Schulz
Voiced byCathy Steinberg (1963–1968)
Hilary Momberger (1969–1973)
Erin Sullivan (1969)
Lynn Mortensen (1974–1975)
Gail M. Davis (1975–1977)
Annalisa Bortolin (1977–1980)
Cindi Reilly (1980–1982, 1983)
Stacy Heather Tolkin (1983)
Stacy Ferguson (1984–1986)
Dawnn D. Leary (1985)
Tiffany Reinbolt (1985)
Elizabeth Lyn Fraser (1986)
Ami Foster (1986, 1988)
Christina Lange (1988)
Brittany M. Thornton (1988–1989)
Adrienne Stiefel (1990)
Kaitlyn Walker (1991)
Mindy Ann Martin (1992)
Jamie Hendy (1994)
Danielle Keaton (1995, 1997)
Ashley Edner (2000)
Nicolette Little (2002)
Megan Taylor Harvey (2002–2003)
Hannah Leigh Dworkin (2003)
Olivia Dunford (2006)
Sierra Marcoux (2006)
Katie Fischer (2006)
Claire Corlett (2008–2009)
Amanda Pace (2011)
Mariel Sheets (2015)
Emma Yarovinsky (2016)
Taylor Autumn Bertman (2016)
Sara J. Gosselin (2018-2019)
Hattie Kragten (2019)
Charlie Townsend (2019-present)
In-universe information
GenderFemale
FamilyCharlie Brown (older brother)

Unnamed parents
Silas Brown (grandfather)
Unnamed uncle
Unnamed grandmother

Snoopy (Dog)

Sally Brown is a fictional character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. She is the younger sister of main character Charlie Brown.[1] She was first mentioned in May 1959 and throughout a long series of strips before her first appearance in August 1959.[2] Cathy Steinberg was the first to voice Sally in 1965 for the CBS special A Charlie Brown Christmas; she was six years old at the time.[3][4]

History[edit]

Sally was born on May 26, 1959, with Charlie Brown receiving a telephone call from the hospital and dashing out of the house yelling that he had a new baby sister.[5] She was given the name "Sally" on June 2, 1959.[5] Although Sally was often talked about and was the cause for a celebration that included Charlie Brown passing out chocolate cigars, it was not until August 23, 1959 that she finally made her first appearance in the strip.[5]

Like other characters, such as Linus and Schroeder (who were also introduced to the strip as babies), Sally grew up quickly. The week of August 22, 1960, she took her first steps, and developed a lasting crush on Linus.[6]

Sally went to kindergarten for the first time in a three-week sequence in August and September, 1962.[7] According to the video game "Snoopy Concert", the name of her school is Pine Crest Elementary School.

Unfortunately, her lack of aptitude for formal education quickly became apparent, as she nervously admitted in a later strip that she was sure they had made her go through kindergarten again because she had failed flower-bringing. Nevertheless, she did eventually complete kindergarten and settled in at about first or second grade age for the remainder of the strip's run.

It was originally Linus who expressed a possible romantic interest in Sally. In a strip appearing shortly after Sally's birth, Linus is seen scribbling calculations on a fence. When Charlie Brown wanders by, Linus asks him, "When I'm 22 and Sally is 17, do you think she'll go out with me?"[5] When Schulz revived the joke more than a year later, though, it was Sally who fell for Linus rather than the other way around.

In a storyline which began on November 29, 1965, Sally was diagnosed with amblyopia ex anopisa (lazy eye) which required her to wear an eye patch for a while.[8][9] Her eye patch often went missing because Snoopy took it, pretending to be a pirate. Sally gave Snoopy the eye patch after her ophthalmologist told her that she did not need to wear it anymore. Some of the strips in which Sally was diagnosed with lazy eye were later reprinted in a comic book, Security is an Eye Patch, which was published and distributed for free by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

In September 1974, Sally started talking to her school building, expressing her fears and concerns about going to school.[10] The building would answer back in thought bubbles, although Schulz's intention was that Sally couldn't hear these replies.[11]

Portrayals[edit]

Cathy Steinberg was the first to voice Sally Brown in A Charlie Brown Christmas in 1965. Various actresses have voiced her since. Linda Jenner voiced her from It's a Mystery, Charlie Brown (1974) to Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown (1975). In It's Flashbeagle, Charlie Brown (1984), Snoopy's Getting Married, Charlie Brown (1985), and the 1983 season of The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show, Sally was voiced by Stacy Ferguson, better known as Fergie of the Black Eyed Peas.

Other voice actresses who have played Sally include:

  • Hilary Momberger (1969–1973)
  • Erin Sullivan (1969)
  • Lynn Mortensen (1974–1975)
  • Gail Davis (1975–1977)
  • Annalisa Bortolin (1980)
  • Cindi Reilly (1981–1983)
  • Stacy Heather Tolkin (1983)
  • Tiffany Reinbolt (1985)
  • Elizabeth Lyn Fraser (1986)
  • Ami Foster (1988)
  • Christina Lange (1988)
  • Brittany Thornton (1988–1989)
  • Adrienne Stiefel (1990)
  • Kaitlyn Walker (1991)
  • Mindy Ann Martin (1992)
  • Jamie Hendy (1994)
  • Danielle Keaton (1997)
  • Nicolette Little (2002)
  • Megan Taylor Harvey (2002–2003)
  • Hanna Leigh Dworkin (2003)
  • Sierra Marcoux (2006)
  • Claire Corlett (2008)
  • Amanda Pace (2011)
  • Mariel Sheets (2015)
  • Emma Yarovinsky (2016)
  • Taylor Autumn Bertman (2016)
  • Sara J. Gosselin (2018–2019)
  • Hattie Kragten (2019)
  • Charlie Townsend (2019–present)

Kristin Chenoweth played Sally in the Broadway revival of the musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, winning the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress. The character of Sally had not been in the original production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. In the revival Sally replaced Patty (not to be confused with the later character Peppermint Patty) who had long since disappeared from the comic strip. Sally was most recently played by Milly Shapiro in the 2016 revival of You're a Good Man Charlie Brown.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schappell, Elissa (2019). "Je suis Sally Brown". In Blauner, Andrew (ed.). The Peanuts Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life. Library of America. ISBN 978-1598536164.
  2. ^ Farago, Andrew (2017). The Complete Peanuts Family Album: The Ultimate Guide to Charles M. Schulz's Classic Characters. Weldon Owen. p. 137. ISBN 978-1681882925.
  3. ^ Mendelson, Lee (2013). A Charlie Brown Christmas: The Making of a Tradition. It Books. p. 23. ISBN 978-0062272140.
  4. ^ "Behind the Voice Actors – Voice of Sally Brown". behindthevoiceactors.com. Retrieved 28 April 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d Schulz, Charles M. (2013). The Complete Peanuts: 1959 to 1960. Fantagraphics Books. pp. 63, 66, 69, 101. ISBN 978-1560976714.
  6. ^ Schulz, Charles M. (2013). The Complete Peanuts: 1959 to 1960. Fantagraphics Books. pp. 258–259. ISBN 978-1560976714.
  7. ^ Schulz, Charles M. (2014). The Complete Peanuts: 1961-1962. Fantagraphics Books. pp. 257–264. ISBN 978-1560976721.
  8. ^ Schulz, Charles M. (2010). My Life with Charlie Brown. University Press of Mississippi. p. 100. ISBN 9781604734485. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  9. ^ Schulz, Charles M. (2013). The Complete Peanuts: 1965 to 1966. Fantagraphics Books. pp. 144–148. ISBN 978-1560977247.
  10. ^ Tisserand, Michael (2017). "Footballs and Ottim Liffs: Charlie Brown in Coconino". In Gordon, Ian; Gardner, Jared (eds.). The Comics of Charles Schulz: The Good Grief of Modern Life. University Press of Mississippi. p. 117. ISBN 9781496812926. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  11. ^ Groth, Gary (2000). "Schulz at 3 O'Clock in the Morning". In Inge, M. Thomas (ed.). Charles M. Schulz: Conversations. University Press of Mississippi. p. 223. ISBN 9781578063055. Retrieved 4 September 2020.

External links[edit]