Salvestrol

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A salvestrol is a dietary phytochemical.[1] The name "salvestrols" was coined by medicinal chemist Gerrard Potter.[2] "Salvestrol" has been trademarked and is used to market dietary supplements and other products.[3][4] Some salvestrol-based products contain extracts from blackcurrant, blueberry, strawberry, and tangerine peel.[5]

Salvesterols have been marketed as dietary supplements promoted for their supposed anti-cancer abilities. According to Andy Lewis, publisher of The Quackometer Blog, "there is no evidence to suggest that these plant-derived chemicals have any positive effect on reducing cancer risk when taken in supplement form or for forming any part of a medical regime for cancer sufferers".[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tan, H. L. et al (2007). "Salvestrols–natural anticancer prodrugs in the diet". Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 59(S1):A-59–A-63. doi:10.1211/002235707781850122.
  2. ^ Ware, W. R. (2009). "Nutrition and the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Association of Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 With the Role of Fruit and Fruit Extracts". Integrative Cancer Therapies. 8 (1): 22–28. PMID 19116217. doi:10.1177/1534735408328573. 
  3. ^ "SALVESTROL UK00002375611". Intellectual Property Office. Retrieved 14 October 2013. 
  4. ^ Lewis, Andy (10 July 2006). "Trademarked Science Trade-Offs". The Quackometer Blog. Retrieved 14 October 2013. 
  5. ^ Ware, W. R. (2008). "Nutrition and the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Association of Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 with the Role of Fruit and Fruit Extracts". Integrative Cancer Therapies. 8 (1): 22–8. PMID 19116217. doi:10.1177/1534735408328573. 
  6. ^ Lewis, Andy (15 February 2007). "We the undersigned…". The Quackometer Blog. Retrieved 1 October 2013.