Sam Houston Math, Science, and Technology Center

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Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center
HoustonSamHSHoustonTX.JPG
Address
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center is located in Texas
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center is located in the United States
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center
Sam Houston Math, Science and Technology Center
9400 Irvington Blvd

Houston, Texas 77076
Coordinates29°50′51″N 95°21′37″W / 29.84750°N 95.36028°W / 29.84750; -95.36028Coordinates: 29°50′51″N 95°21′37″W / 29.84750°N 95.36028°W / 29.84750; -95.36028
Information
TypePublic school (U.S.)
Founded1878
PrincipalAlan Summers
Grades9 - 12
Enrollment2,669 (2015-16)[1]
CampusUrban
Color(s)         
MascotTiger
Feeder schoolsBurbank Middle School

Sam Houston Math, Science, and Technology Center (SHMSTC) is a secondary school located at 9400 Irvington Boulevard in Houston, Texas, United States. Sam Houston Math, Science, and Technology Center handles grades nine through twelve and is part of the Houston Independent School District. Before 1955, it was located in Downtown Houston.

Established in 1889, Sam Houston operates the oldest high school newspaper in Texas, the Aegis. Additionally, the school boasts the world's first female-only military drill squad initially known as the Black Battalion but now called the Tigerettes.[2]

The school is often referred to simply as "Sam" by students, alumni, and faculty.

Sam Houston High School Baseball Field is located at 29°51′03″N 95°21′41″W / 29.85083°N 95.36139°W / 29.85083; -95.36139.

History

Houston High School as of October 1909

It was founded in Downtown Houston in 1878 as Houston Academy. Since then, it had several name changes.[2]

  • Houston Academy: 1878 to 1881
  • Clopper Institute: 1881 to 1886
  • Houston Normal School: 1886 to 1895
  • Houston High School: 1895 to 1926
  • Central High School: 1926 to 1955
  • Sam Houston High School: 1955 to 2008 (also referred to as Sam Houston Senior High School)
  • Sam Houston Math, Science, and Technology Center

Until the 1950s the block bordered by Austin, Capitol, Caroline, and Rusk in Downtown Houston housed the institutions that make up what is now Sam Houston High School. Houston Academy was there in the 1850s. In 1894 Central High School was built. J.R. Gonzales of the Houston Chronicle said that the school was "[d]escribed as one of the finest high schools in this part of the country" and "also attracted negative attention for its incredible cost." The school had a price tag of $80,000, $1.9 million in 2010 dollars. In March 1919 the school burned down. A new Sam Houston opened two years later.[3]

According to a 1936 Houston Chronicle article, Sam Houston was to be renamed after Dick Dowling, while the Sam Houston name would be taken by a new high school in southwestern Houston. This did not occur, and the school remained named after Sam Houston.[3]

In 1955, Houston High School moved from its Capitol Street location in Downtown to its current location.[2] The previous Sam Houston High School became the Houston Independent School District administrative headquarters.[3] In July 1970 the first Hattie Mae White Administration Building became the new HISD administrative offices.[4] The Downtown Sam Houston building was demolished. As of 2011 a parking lot owned by HISD now occupies that site. A historical marker is on the south side of that block. In meetings it had been proposed as a new location for the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts.[3]

Sam Houston has Texas' oldest high school newspaper, the Aegis, started in 1889. In addition, the world's first girls' Military Drill Squad (formerly known as the Black Battalion, but now called the Tigerettes) originated at the school.

The school was originally all white; it was desegregated in 1970 and today has a mostly Hispanic student body.[5][6]

The names of the individual schools currently occupying the Sam Houston campus were chosen in 2008.[7]

On Saturday February 12, 2011, a state historic marker was dedicated at Sam Houston. The Oran M. Roberts Chapter 440 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy organized the event. Lynna Kay Shuffield, the president of the chapter, wrote a historical narrative about the school and its former location in Downtown.[8]

The Reconstruction of the Campus started in late 2016 and its estimated completion would be in 2019.

Rating

Sam Houston, with Jack Yates High School and Kashmere High School, are the three high schools in Houston ISD that were consistently low-performing in test scores from 2001 to 2004. Because of this problem, there were movements to have the state or another organization take over the schools for a period so the test scores will be at acceptable levels. While Yates got an acceptable rating in 2005, Houston and Kashmere continued to get unacceptable ratings. Abelardo Saavedra, the superintendent of HISD, described Houston as being "close" to getting an acceptable rating. In August 2006 the school learned that it again got an unacceptable rating from the Texas Education Agency. HISD threatened to close Sam Houston. Sam Houston was not closed and it received another unacceptable rating from the TEA. Houston ISD, stated that the board would consider spending $300,000 to find a method to improve Sam Houston's marks from the TEA.[9]

In 2008 the Texas Education Agency Commissioner Robert Scott ordered the closure of Sam Houston; the Houston Chronicle said that HISD would likely replace 75% of the teachers and change the name of the school.[10] The campus now houses Sam Houston Math, Science, and Technology Center for 2010–2012 and a ninth grade academy. The administration hopes that the changes would cause Sam Houston to get an acceptable rating.[11]

In 2007, an Associated Press/Johns Hopkins University study referred to Sam Houston as a "dropout factory" where at least 40% of the entering freshman class does not make it to their senior year.[12]

Student body

During the 2005-2006 school year, the school had 2,678 students.[5][6]

No Native Americans were enrolled during that school year.

Approximately 89% of the students qualified for free/reduced lunch.

Neighborhoods served by Sam Houston

Several areas of Houston outside of the 610 Loop that are far north of Downtown and south of Aldine are zoned to Sam Houston.[13]

Neighborhoods include Melrose Park, Hardy Acres, Hardy Heights, Assumption Heights, Roos Acres, Virginia Acres, Sunnyland Farms, Oakwood, and Northline Terrace.

Two Houston Housing Authority public housing complexes, Heatherbrook Apartments and Oxford Place, are zoned to the school.[14][15]

Some small sections of unincorporated Harris County are zoned to Sam Houston High School.

Feeder patterns

Elementary schools that feed into Sam Houston include:[13]

(partial)

All of Fonville Middle School-zoned areas[31] and some areas of the Burbank Middle[32] and Henry Middle School[33] zones feed into Sam Houston.

Notable alumni

On November 22, 1963, following the assassination of US President John F. Kennedy, alumnus Jack Valenti (far left) was present at then-US Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson's swearing-in ceremony as the new US president aboard Air Force One.

Notable faculty

  • Lyndon B. Johnson: 36th president of the United States (1963–1969), taught public speaking in 1930.[35]

See also

References

  1. ^ "HOUSTON MATH SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "About Us Archived 2007-10-25 at the Wayback Machine." Sam Houston High School.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gonzales, J.R. "Sam Houston High School (old)." Houston Chronicle. March 30, 2010. Retrieved on November 22, 2011.
  4. ^ Radcliffe, Jennifer. "HISD landmark demolished / Known as district's `Taj Mahal,' it won't be missed by everyone / Tearing away its old image." Houston Chronicle. Friday September 15, 2006. B1 MetFront. Retrieved on May 29, 2009.
  5. ^ a b "Sam Houston High School Profile Archived 2004-03-06 at the Wayback Machine," Houston Independent School District
  6. ^ a b "Sam Houston High School," SchoolDigger
  7. ^ "Names for Two Newly Created HISD Schools at Sam Houston Chosen." Houston Independent School District. August 13, 2008. Retrieved on July 27, 2010.
  8. ^ Gonzales, J.R. "Remembering Kiddie Wonderland and Sam Houston High School." Houston Chronicle. February 10, 2011. Retrieved on November 22, 2011.
  9. ^ "Remedy proposed for ailing campus - HISD weighs a $300,000 effort to boost rating for Sam Houston High[permanent dead link]," Houston Chronicle, August 8, 2007
  10. ^ Radcliffe, Jennifer and Ericka Mellon. "HISD hopes to open a redesigned Sam Houston in fall[permanent dead link]." Houston Chronicle. June 5, 2008. Retrieved on May 29, 2009.
  11. ^ Mellon, Ericka. "Looks like school's makeover is paying off." Houston Chronicle. May 28, 2009. Retrieved on May 29, 2009.
  12. ^ "Report points to 'dropout factories'," Houston Chronicle, October 31, 2007
  13. ^ a b "Sam Houston High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  14. ^ "Heatherbrook Apartments." Houston Housing Authority. Retrieved on January 2, 2018. "2000 Tidwell Houston, Texas 77093"
  15. ^ "Oxford Place." Houston Housing Authority. Retrieved on January 2, 2019. "605 Berry Road Houston, Texas 77022"
  16. ^ "Barrick Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  17. ^ "Burbank Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  18. ^ "Coop Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  19. ^ "DeChaumes Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  20. ^ "Durkee Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  21. ^ "Janowski Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  22. ^ "Lyons Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  23. ^ "Moreno Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  24. ^ "Northline Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  25. ^ "Scarborough Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  26. ^ "Berry Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  27. ^ "Garcia Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  28. ^ "Herrera Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  29. ^ "Kennedy Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  30. ^ "Osborne Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  31. ^ "Fonville Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  32. ^ "Burbank Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  33. ^ "Henry Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  34. ^ Goyen, William. "While You Were Away (Houston Seen and Unseen, 1923-1978)." In: Goyne, William (Editor: Reginald Gibbons). Goyen: Autobiographical Essays, Notebooks, Evocations, Interviews. Goyen: Autobiographical Essays, Notebooks, Evocations, Interviews. University of Texas Press, May 1, 2007. ISBN 0292714912, 9780292714915. Start: p. 39. Cited: p. 46.
  35. ^ "President Lyndon B. Johnson's Biography Archived 2012-01-18 at the Wayback Machine." Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum. Retrieved on January 29, 2009.

External links