Sam Sing Kung Temple

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Sam Sing Kung Temple
Sandakan Sabah SamSingKungTemple-08.jpg
Sam Sing Kung Temple
Basic information
Location Sandakan
Geographic coordinates 5°50′26.88″N 118°6′51.48″E / 5.8408000°N 118.1143000°E / 5.8408000; 118.1143000Coordinates: 5°50′26.88″N 118°6′51.48″E / 5.8408000°N 118.1143000°E / 5.8408000; 118.1143000
Affiliation Taoism
District Sandakan District
State Sabah
Country Malaysia
Architectural description
Architectural type Chinese temple
Date established unknown
Completed 1887

Sam Sing Kung Temple (also known as the Three Saints Temple) is a Chinese temple in Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia. Built in 1887, the temple is the third oldest temple in Sandakan, after Goddess of Mercy Temple and Tam Kung Temple.[1][2] It is part of the Sandakan Heritage Trail.

History[edit]

The temple was built in 1887, and has undergone several recent renovations.[1] The temple was originally established as a religious centre for Chinese migrants who had arrived from Guangdong, Qing Dynasty. It was built by Chinese communities of Cantonese, Teochew, Hakkas and the Hainanese people.[3] The temple are also called as "Three Saints Temple" with the three saints refers to:[1][3][4]

  • Kwan Woon Cheung – Saint of righteousness.
  • Goddess of Tin Hou – Worshipped by fishermen and seamen for protection.
  • Min Cheong Emperor – Worshipped by hopeful students who seek success in examinations.

The temple is known as a place for Chinese devotees to come for blessing and divination.[1]

Features[edit]

The temple has a collection of 100 pre-printed Taoist Divination Poems. Its bronze bell was donated by the first Kapitan Cina of Sandakan, known as Fung Ming Shan. Ming Shan was appointed by the British rulers in 1887 to manage and oversee the Chinese community in the town.[1][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Sam Sing Kung Temple". Wong Fook Yee. 17 July 2013. Archived from the original on 4 October 2016. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  2. ^ Tamara Thiessen (2012). Borneo: Sabah - Brunei - Sarawak. Bradt Travel Guides. pp. 217–. ISBN 978-1-84162-390-0.
  3. ^ a b c "Sam Sing Kung Temple". Sabah Education Department. Archived from the original on 4 October 2016. Retrieved 4 October 2016.
  4. ^ Lonely Planet; Daniel Robinson; Adam Karlin; Paul Stiles (1 May 2013). Lonely Planet Borneo. Lonely Planet. pp. 133–. ISBN 978-1-74321-651-4.

External links[edit]