Sam Stephenson

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Sam Stephenson
Born (1933-12-15)December 15, 1933
Dublin, Ireland
Died November 9, 2006(2006-11-09) (aged 72)
Alma mater Dublin Institute of Technology
Occupation Architect
Spouse(s)
  • Bernadette Flood
  • Caroline Sweetman
Children
  • Karen
  • Bronwyn
  • Mark
  • Sam
  • Sebastian
  • Zachary
Parent(s) Patrick Joseph Stephenson
Relatives Desmond Stephenson (brother)

Sam Stephenson (15 December 1933 – 9 November 2006) was an Irish architect who studied at the Bolton Street School of Architecture, which is now known as Dublin Institute of Technology. Many of his buildings generated considerable controversy when they were built.

Family[edit]

He was the youngest of five sons born to Paddy Joe Stephenson, former Chief Librarian of Dublin and a founder of the Old Dublin Society, who had fought in the 1916 Rising and had helped to restore Kilmainham Gaol. His elder brother was the renowned artist Desmond Stephenson. Sam married Bernadette Flood and they had two daughters Karen and Bronwyn and two sons Mark and Sam. His second marriage was to Caroline Sweetman, daughter of Barbara and Michael Sweetman, and they had two sons, Sebastian and Zachary.

Notable buildings[edit]

The Central Bank, prominently featured on Dame Street

Stephenson's most famous buildings are all in Dublin, and exemplify the style of Brutalist architecture:

  • Central Bank of Ireland Dame Street (1975) - It was built higher than planning permission allowed but this was rectified retrospectively. The matter was debated in the Oireachtas in 1974.[1]
  • ESB Headquarters at Fitzwilliam Street (1976) - A block of Georgian houses was demolished to make way for this building. This destroyed the Georgian Mile in Dublin.
  • Dublin Corporation Offices at Wood Quay - Phase 1 (1976) - The remains of Viking Dublin were discovered during the construction of this building. Despite protests to save the site, construction went ahead. The buildings were known as The Bunkers because of their severe appearance.
  • Currency Centre, Sandyford (1979)
  • Bord na Móna building, Baggot Street

Awards[edit]

  • RIAI Gold Medal (1985)

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Questions, 21 May, 1974; Central Bank Building.

References[edit]