Samantha Bond

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Samantha Bond
Samantha Bond.jpg
Samantha Bond attends the Downton Abbey Ball at the Savoy Hotel, London in 2015
Born (1961-11-27) 27 November 1961 (age 57)
London, United Kingdom
NationalityBritish
OccupationActress
Years active1983–present
Known forJames Bond
Blinded
TelevisionOutnumbered
The Sarah Jane Adventures
Downton Abbey
Home Fires
The Bill
Spouse(s)
Alexander Hanson (m. 1989)
Children2

Samantha Bond (born 27 November 1961) is an English actress, perhaps best known for playing Miss Moneypenny in four James Bond films during the series' Pierce Brosnan years, and for her role on Downton Abbey as the wealthy widow Lady Rosamund Painswick, sister of Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham. She is also well-known for originating the role of "Miz Liz" Probert in the Rumpole of the Bailey series. Bond is a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Early life[edit]

Samantha Bond is the daughter of actor Philip Bond and TV producer Pat Sandys, and is the sister of the actress Abigail Bond and the journalist Matthew Bond.[1] She was brought up in London, in homes in Barnes and St Margarets.[2] She attended the Godolphin and Latymer School, and studied acting at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Bond's first acting role came at the age of 21, as a student in the original stage production of Denise Deegan's play about a girls' school, Daisy Pulls It Off, which opened at Southampton's Nuffield Theatre in 1983.[3] Her earliest television roles took place during the same year, when she played Maria Rushworth (née Bertram), in the BBC mini-series adaptation of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, and Rumpole's pupil in chambers "Miz Liz" Probert in the fourth series of Rumpole of the Bailey. In 1985, she appeared as Julia Simmons in the BBC's televised adaptation of Agatha Christie's crime novel A Murder is Announced, part of the Miss Marple series.[4][5]

Theatre[edit]

Bond's association with the Royal Shakespeare Company (known as the RSC) began in 1987; she performed in three of the company's stage productions that year: Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Hero and Leander, and Lorca's Women.[6] In 1992, the RSC cast her as Rosalind in Shakespeare's As You Like It, which she performed in their Stratford-upon-Avon and London theatres, and as Hermione in The Winter's Tale, also at the company's two theatres.[6] She then toured with the RSC as Hermione in 1993.[citation needed]

Bond starred as the titular Amy in the Royal National Theatre's West End production of David Hare's play Amy's View, opposite Dame Judi Dench, in 1997 and into early 1998. Later in 1998, she co-starred in playwright Shelagh Stephenson's The Memory of Water, also in the West End.[citation needed]

In 1999, Bond and Dench reprised their roles in Amy's View on Broadway for a limited run at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. Their performances garnered Bond a Tony nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Play, and Dench the Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Play.[7][8] Hare received a special citation from the New York Drama Critics' Circle.[9]

Bond revisited The Memory of Water, making her directorial debut on a short touring production of the play in 2000, the same year it won an Olivier award for Best New Comedy.[10] She also performed in numerous stage productions during the 2000s, among them: Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream in 2001, as Hippolyta and Titania, again for the RSC[6]; Donald Margulies's Pulitzer prize-winning Dinner with Friends[11], as Karen, opposite her Downton Abbey co-star Elizabeth McGovern and directed by McGovern's husband Simon Curtis, in 2001[12]; The Vagina Monologues in 2002 [13][14] ; and in Shakespeare's Macbeth, as Lady Macbeth opposite Sean Bean in the title role, on tour in 2002 and 2003.[15][16]

Other stage performances include Oscar Wilde's A Woman of No Importance in 2003[17][18]; The Rubenstein Kiss in 2005[19]; Michael Frayn's Donkey's Years at London's Comedy Theatre in 2006[20]; and David Leveaux's West End revival of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia at the Duke of York's Theatre, in 2009 as Hannah, alongside another Downton Abbey co-star, Dan Stevens.[21]

The next decade brought Bond onstage in Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband, as Mrs. Cheveley opposite her real-life actor husband Alexander Hanson as Mr. Cheveley, in 2010-2011[22][23], and as Nell in Passion Play by Peter Nichols in 2013.[24] In 2014, Bond acted and sang in the West End musical production of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, playing the role of Muriel Eubanks. Bond stated in an interview that she hadn't sung on stage in over 30 years and had many moments during rehearsals where she turned her back toward anyone listening to her sing and frequently shook "with terror" at the prospect.[25] In a Radio Times review of the play, the critic described Bond as "stage royalty" and "hilarious." [26] In October and November 2017, Bond appeared in the English language premiere of Florian Zeller's modern French farce, The Lie, once again alongside her husband, Alexander Hanson, at an Off-West End theatre called the Menier Chocolate Factory. [27]

Television and Film[edit]

In 1989, Bond starred as Mary MacKenzie, a young Scottish woman, in the television adaptation of Oswald Wynd's novel The Ginger Tree, and was featured in Erik the Viking, an independent fantasy film with Tim Robbins in the title role.[citation needed]

She appeared in a 1990 adaptation of Agatha Christie's short story, The Adventure of the Cheap Flat, for the series Agatha Cristie's Poirot on ITV, starring David Suchet as Hercule Poirot. [28]. Bond was also seen on ITV in an episode of the "Inspector Morse" detective drama series based on novels by Colin Dexter, in 1992, and in a 1995 episode of Ghosts, an anthology series of ghost stories on the BBC. In 1996, she portrayed Mrs. Weston in the television movie Jane Austen's Emma, starring Kate Beckinsale as Emma, a Meridian-ITV/A&E production that has been described as grittier and "more authentic" to Austen's story than the theatrical film starring Gwyneth Paltrow that was released the same year.[29] The television movie was broadcast in the US in 1997 on PBS.[citation needed]

From 1994 to 2005, Bond played Miss Moneypenny, M's secretary at MI6, in the four James Bond films with Pierce Brosnan as Agent 007: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough, and Die Another Day. The role of Miss Moneypenny is the smallest role she ever played[23], yet the character remains a favorite among James Bond fans. In a BBC interview, Bond remarked that she would retire from the role if and when Pierce Brosnan stepped down as the lead.[30] However, she did appear as Miss Moneypenny in an advertisement for London's 2012 Olympic bid, alongside Roger Moore, who played James Bond from 1973 until 1985.[citation needed]

Bond co-starred in 2004 with Peter Davison, as a married couple who uproot themselves to a remote island to save their marriage, in the ITV drama-comedy Distant Shores. In 2007, she played the villain Mrs. Wormwood in the pilot episode of the BBC children's drama series The Sarah Jane Adventures, a spin-off of Doctor Who. She later came back to play the same character in the two-part finale of the show's second series, Enemy of the Bane.[citation needed]

Bond guest-starred in three episodes of the long-running and popular murder mystery series Midsomer Murders: Destroying Angel in 2001, Shot at Dawn in 2008, both starring fellow RSC member John Nettles in the lead role of DCI Tom Barnaby, as well as the first episode in 2011's series 14, Death in the Slow Lane. The 2011 episode is notable for Neil Dudgeon's debut as DCI John Barnaby, who takes over as the new detective in Midsomer after his cousin Tom Barnaby retired.[citation needed]

From 2007 to 2014, Bond had a recurring role as Auntie Angela in the BBC's semi-improvised comedy series Outnumbered, alongside Hugh Dennis, Claire Skinner and David Ryall. She appeared in all five seasons.[citation needed]

From 2010 through 2015 (in the UK), Bond appeared as Lady Rosamund Painswick in the ensemble cast of ITV's drama series Downton Abbey, written and produced by Julian Fellowes. The mini-series quickly became an unprecedented worldwide hit. Each season was shown in the US on PBS's Masterpiece program one year following its broadcast in the UK; according to PBS, Downton Abbey rose to become the most popular drama ever shown on the station, and the most popular series in the history of Masterpiece.[31] Lady Rosamund is the widowed, wealthy, and sometimes meddling sister of Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham. Bond's first appearance was in the last episode of the first season; she appeared in 18 episodes overall, throughout the entire series.[citation needed]

The ITV show Home Fires featured Bond as Frances Barden, a woman working to strengthen connections among the women in her small English village by keeping the local Women's Institute operating during the early days of World War II. The show premiered in the UK in 2015 and was cancelled in 2016, to which fans reacted by petitioning ITV to reinstate the popular drama, to no avail.[32] It played in the US on PBS's Masterpiece in 2016 and 2017, where viewers were similarly disappointed to learn of the show's demise. The series creator, Simon Block, has stated he intends to continue the story in written form, as novels.[33]

Personal life[edit]

She lives in St Margarets, London,[2][34] and has been married since 1989 to Alexander Hanson, with whom she has two children, Molly and Tom.[1][2][35][36][37]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1989 Erik the Viking Helga Featured
1995 GoldenEye Miss Moneypenny Featured
1997 Tomorrow Never Dies Miss Moneypenny Featured
1998 What Rats Won't Do Jane
1999 The World Is Not Enough Miss Moneypenny Featured
2001 The Children's Midsummer Night's Dream Hippolyta Voice
2002 Die Another Day Miss Moneypenny Featured
2004 Blinded Doctor Caroline Lamor Main
2004 Yes Kate
2004 Strings Eike Voice, English version
2008 A Bunch of Amateurs Dorothy Nettle

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1983 Mansfield Park Maria Bertram Main
1985 Agatha Christie's Miss Marple Julia Simmons Main (serial: A Murder is Announced)
1987 Rumpole of the Bailey Elizabeth "Miz Liz" Probert Recurring (Fourth Series)
1989 The Ginger Tree Mary Mackenzie Main
1990 Agatha Christie's Poirot Stella Robinson Guest (episode: "The Adventure of the Cheap Flat")
1996 Emma Miss Taylor/Mrs. Weston Main
2001–2011 Midsomer Murders Kate Cameron/Arabella Hammond/Suzanna Chambers Guest (3 episodes)
2005–2006 Donovan Kate Donovan Main (3 episodes)
2007 Fanny Hill Mrs Cole Main (2 episodes)
2007 Mobile Rachel West Main
2007–2008 The Sarah Jane Adventures Mrs Wormwood Recurring (3 episodes)
2007–2014 Outnumbered Auntie Angela Recurring (10 episodes)
2008 Distant Shores Lisa Shore Main (6 episodes)
2008 Hotel Babylon Caroline Guest (1 episode)
2009 Heartbeat Sylvia Swinton Guest (1 episode)
2009 Lark Rise to Candleford Celestia Brice Coulson Guest (1 episode)
2009 Agatha Christie's Marple Sylvia Savage Guest (1 episode)
2009 The Queen Queen Elizabeth II Main (episode:"Us and Them")
2010 New Tricks Anne Gorton Guest (1 episode)
2010–2015 Downton Abbey Lady Rosamund Painswick Recurring (18 episodes)
2015–2016 Home Fires Frances Barden Main (11 episodes)
2016 Murdoch Mysteries Lady Suzanne Atherly Guest (Episodes: "Great Balls of Fire Part 1", "Great Balls of Fire Part 2")
2017 A Royal Winter Beatrice TV Movie, Main

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Genevieve Roberts (21 April 2012). "Samantha Bond: From sex symbol to sozzled wife". The Independent.
  2. ^ a b c Brocklehurst, Philip (Winter 2011). "Mr Brocklehurst meets..." Mystmargarets.com. p. 28. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  3. ^ Robert Gore-Langton (25 Apr 2002). "Hurrah! Daisy blooms again". The Telegraph.
  4. ^ Matthew Bunson, ed. (2000). The Complete Christie: an Agatha Christie encyclopedia. Pocket Books. p. 414.
  5. ^ Michael R. Pitts. "30". Famous Movie Detectives III. p. 152.
  6. ^ a b c "Royal Shakespeare Company archives search results, Shakespeare.org Collections: Samantha Bond". Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  7. ^ "Amy's View Production Information - 1999, Broadway World". Wisdom Digital Media. Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  8. ^ Robin Pogrebin (June 7, 1999). "A Revival of 'Salesman' Takes 4 Tony Awards; 'Side Man,' 'Fosse,' Judi Dench and Brian Dennehy Win Top Honors". NY Times.
  9. ^ "New York Drama Critics Circle: Past Awards". Retrieved 24 Dec 2017.
  10. ^ "Olivier Awards: Winners 2000". Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  11. ^ "Dinner with Friends Wins Pulitzer Prize for Drama". Playbill Inc. 10 Apr 2000.
  12. ^ Michael Billington (4 Jul 2001). "Dinner with Friends, Hampstead Theatre, London - Review". The Guardian.
  13. ^ "Tour archive for The Vagina Monologues (play). 26 February 2002-22nd June 2002 [TOUR]". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  14. ^ "Vagina Monologues New Cast 20th May 02". LondonTheatre.co.uk, London Theatre Guide (online newsletter). 15 May 2002.
  15. ^ "Tour archive for Macbeth (play). 17th October 2002-1st March 2003 [TOUR]". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  16. ^ Michael Billington (15 Nov 2002). "Macbeth, Albery Theatre, London". The Guardian.
  17. ^ Michael Billington (17 Sep 2003). "A Woman of No Importance, Haymarket Theatre, London - Review". The Guardian.
  18. ^ Matt Wolf (25 Sep 2003). "Review: A Woman of No Importance". Variety Media, LLC.
  19. ^ Michael Billington (24 Nov 2005). "Review: The Rubenstein Kiss, Hampstead Theatre, London". The Guardian.
  20. ^ David Benedict (16 May 2006). "Review: Donkey's Years". Variety Media, LLC.
  21. ^ "Tour Archive for Arcadia (play). 27th May 2009-12th September 2009 [TOUR]". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 22 Dec 2017.
  22. ^ "Samantha Bond in An Ideal Husband". The West End Theatre. 3 Oct 2010.
  23. ^ a b Carole Cadwalladr (13 Nov 2010). "Samantha Bond: Don't call me Miss Moneypenny". The Guardian.
  24. ^ Matthew Tucker (12 Jun 2013). "Passion Play (REVIEW): Zoë Wanamaker And Samantha Bond Are Sisters Of The Stage". Huffington Post UK.
  25. ^ Matt Wolf (9 Apr 2014). "Samantha Bond on Visiting Downton & Her Disastrous Audition for London's Dirty Rotten Scoundrels: Q&A". Broadway.com.
  26. ^ Susanna Lazarus (3 April 2014). "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Review – Robert Lindsay's triumphant return to the West End stage".
  27. ^ Michael Billington (9 Oct 2017). "The Lie review – Florian Zeller tells the uncomfortable truth about a marriage". The Guardian.
  28. ^ Matthew Bunson, ed. (2000). The Complete Christie: an Agatha Christie encyclopedia. Pocket Books. p. 396.
  29. ^ Laura Boyle (5 Jan 2001). "Emma (3): 1996". Jane Austen Centre.
  30. ^ "Bond on Bond". BBC News. 7 May 2006. Retrieved 10 November 2014.
  31. ^ PBS (8 Mar 2016). "Press Release: PBS Stations Draw 9.6 Million Viewers to Bid Farewell to "Downton Abbey" on MASTERPIECE".
  32. ^ Emma Powell (12 May 2016). "Home Fires fans launch petition and slam ITV for cancelling show but keeping The X Factor". The Evening Standard.
  33. ^ Gail Pennington (May 8, 2017). "Finale cliffhangers frustrate 'Home Fires' fans". St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
  34. ^ Buchanan, Clare (15 January 2014). "St Margarets resident Samantha Bond misses out on star baker". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  35. ^ "My perfect weekend: Samantha Bond". The Daily Telegraph. 7 May 2013.
  36. ^ Philby, Charlotte."My Secret Life: Samantha Bond, Actress, 47"The Independent, 13 December 2008. Archived 11 January 2011 at the Wayback Machine.
  37. ^ Broadway.com."Samantha Bond on Her Ideal London Role Opposite Real-Life Husband Alexander Hanson" Broadway.com, 5 January 2011. Archived 17 January 2011 at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]


Preceded by
Caroline Bliss
1987–1989
Miss Moneypenny
(in Eon James Bond films)
1995–2002
Succeeded by
Naomie Harris
2012–