Same-sex marriage in Taiwan: Difference between revisions

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(Undid revision 548464213 by 219.76.89.121 (talk) per move, plus the country is known as Taiwan not the Republic of China)
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[[File:Wedded couple on Taiwan Pride 2006.jpg|200px|thumb|left|One of four newly wedded couples at a public wedding at [[Taiwan Pride]] 2006.]]
 
[[File:Wedded couple on Taiwan Pride 2006.jpg|200px|thumb|left|One of four newly wedded couples at a public wedding at [[Taiwan Pride]] 2006.]]
Same-sex marriage cannot legally be performed in [[Taiwan]]. Currently, Taiwan does not have any recognition of same-sex unions.{{Citation needed|date=October 2010}}
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Same-sex marriage cannot legally be performed in [[Taiwan (island)|Taiwan]], Kinmen, the Matsu Islands, Wuchiu, the Pratas Islands and Taiping, collectively known commonly as [[Taiwan]] and officially as the Republic of China. Currently, Taiwan does not have any recognition of same-sex unions.{{Citation needed|date=October 2010}}
   
 
In August 2012, two women participated in what the media called Taiwan's first same-sex marriage ceremony.<ref>http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/13/world/asia/taiwan-buddhist-same-sex-wedding/index.html</ref>
 
In August 2012, two women participated in what the media called Taiwan's first same-sex marriage ceremony.<ref>http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/13/world/asia/taiwan-buddhist-same-sex-wedding/index.html</ref>

Revision as of 15:21, 4 April 2013

Legal status of same-sex unions
Marriage
Performed
Recognized
  1. Marriages performed in some municipalities and recognized by the state
  2. For some purposes, from all jurisdictions where same-sex marriage is legal
  3. When performed in Mexican states that have legalized same-sex marriage
  4. When performed in the Netherlands proper
  5. Registration schemes opened in all jurisdictions except Hualien County, Penghu County, Taitung County, and Yunlin County

* Not yet in effect

LGBT portal
One of four newly wedded couples at a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006.

Same-sex marriage cannot legally be performed in Taiwan, Kinmen, the Matsu Islands, Wuchiu, the Pratas Islands and Taiping, collectively known commonly as Taiwan and officially as the Republic of China. Currently, Taiwan does not have any recognition of same-sex unions.[citation needed]

In August 2012, two women participated in what the media called Taiwan's first same-sex marriage ceremony.[1]

The Ministry of Justice's Department of Legal Affairs commissioned a study on legal recognitions of same-sex unions in Canada, Germany and France in 2012, but after pressure from critics, commissioned a further study for 2013 on the state of same-sex relationships in Asian countries for comparison.[2]

Legislative efforts and party support

In 2003, the executive branch of the Taiwan government (Executive Yuan) proposed legislation granting marriages to same-sex couples under the Human Rights Basic Law; however, President Ma Ying-jeou said public support was needed before the government could approve the law, thus it has been stalled since.[3]Su Tseng-chang, Chairman of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party has expressed support for same-sex marriage.[4]

Judicial case

In March 2012 a gay couple applied to Taipei High Administrative Court to have their marriage recognized.[5] The first reading had place on April 10, 2012. The couple was accompanied by their mothers and received the personal blessings from the judges for their love, although the judges said that wouldn't have any repercussions in their final ruling. The next hearing was set to take place a month later,[6] and the court was due hand down a decision on December 20.[7] Instead, the court reneged on a ruling, opting to send the case to the Council of Grand Justices in the Judicial Yuan for a constitutional interpretation.[8]

Polls and public support

A poll of 6,439 Taiwanese adults released in April 2006 by the National Union of Taiwan Women's Association/Constitutional Reform Alliance concluded that 75% believe homosexual relations are acceptable, while 25% thought they were unacceptable.[9]

See also

References