Samuel J. Gholson

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Samuel J. Gholson
Samuel J. Gholson.jpg
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi
In office
February 13, 1839 – January 10, 1861
Appointed byMartin Van Buren
Preceded byGeorge Adams
Succeeded byRobert Andrews Hill
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Mississippi's at-large district
In office
July 18, 1837 – February 5, 1838
Preceded byhimself
Succeeded byThomas J. Word
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Mississippi's at-large district
In office
December 1, 1836 – March 3, 1837
Preceded byDavid Dickson
Succeeded byhimself
Personal details
Born
Samuel Jameson Gholson

(1808-05-19)May 19, 1808
Richmond, Kentucky
DiedOctober 16, 1883(1883-10-16) (aged 75)
Aberdeen, Mississippi
Resting placeOdd Fellows Cemetery
Aberdeen, Mississippi
Political partyDemocratic
Educationread law

Samuel Jameson Gholson (May 19, 1808 – October 16, 1883) was a United States Representative from Mississippi, a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi and the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi and a General in the Confederate States Army.

Education and career[edit]

Born on May 19, 1808, near Richmond[1] in Madison County, Kentucky,[2] Gholson moved with his father to Franklin County, Alabama and attended the common schools.[1] He read law and was admitted to the bar at Russellville, Alabama in 1829.[1] He entered private practice in Athens, Monroe County, Mississippi from 1830 to 1839.[2] He was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1835 to 1836, and in 1839.[2]

Congressional service[edit]

Gholson was elected as a Jacksonian Democrat (now Democrat) from Mississippi's at-large congressional district to the United States House of Representatives of the 24th United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of United States Representative David Dickson and served from December 1, 1836, to March 3, 1837.[1] He presented credentials as a Democratic member-elect to the 25th United States Congress and served from July 18, 1837, until February 5, 1838, when the seat was declared vacant.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Gholson was nominated by President Martin Van Buren on February 9, 1839, to a joint seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi and the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi vacated by Judge George Adams.[2] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 13, 1839, and received his commission the same day.[2] His service terminated on January 10, 1861, due to his resignation upon the secession of Mississippi from the Union.[2] Gholson was a member of the Mississippi secession convention in 1861.[1]

Other service[edit]

Concurrent with his federal judicial service, Gholson served in the Mississippi State Militia as a lieutenant in 1846.[2]

Later career and death[edit]

During the American Civil War, Gholson served in the Confederate States Army as a private, captain, colonel, brigadier general, and major general of state troops.[1] He became brigadier general of the Confederate States Army in June 1863, and was placed in command of a brigade of cavalry.[1] He was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1865 to 1866, and in 1878.[2] He resumed private practice in Aberdeen, Mississippi from 1866 to 1878, and from 1878 to 1883.[2] He died on October 16, 1883, in Aberdeen.[2] He was interred in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Aberdeen.[3][1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i United States Congress. "Samuel J. Gholson (id: G000149)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Gholson, Samuel Jameson - Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.
  3. ^ Samuel J. Gholson at Find a Grave

Sources[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
David Dickson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Mississippi's at-large congressional district

1836–1837
Succeeded by
himself
Preceded by
himself
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Mississippi's at-large congressional district

1837–1838
Succeeded by
Thomas J. Word
Legal offices
Preceded by
George Adams
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi

1839–1861
Succeeded by
Robert Andrews Hill