Samuel Lapham VI

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Samuel Lapham VI was born on 23 September 1892 in Charleston, South Carolina to Samuel Lapham V and Annie Grey Soule (a direct descendant of Pilgrim George Soule).[1] He attended the University School of Charleston (which became the Gaud School in 1908, his senior year), College of Charleston graduating in 1913 with a BA, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1916 with a Bachelor of Architecture.[2]

After graduating from MIT, Lapham worked for Fay, Spofford & Thorndike in Boston including work with Adams Cram. In 1917, Lapham moved to Akron, Ohio taking a position with Carmichael Construction Company until the outbreak of the U.S. role in World War I. He applied by mail and joined a South Carolina unit. He attended Officer's Training Camp at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia and Fortress Monroe in Virginia. During the war he served at Fort Moultire in Charleston and the 61st Artillery Brigade, 1st Army, American Expeditionary Forces in France. Upon discharge he joined C.F. Warner of Cleveland, Ohio before returning to Charleston to partner with Albert Simons in 1920.[3]

He joined the Army Reserve serving in the Coastal Artillery starting in 1923. During World War II he was assigned to the Inspector General Office in Atlanta where he inspected construction of bases from Cuba to Kentucky including the secret work at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.[4]

The architectural firm of Simons & Lapham was influential in creating the first historic preservation ordinance in Charleston, South Carolina in 1930. The firm worked on preservation projects in South Carolina and Georgia starting in the 1920s. They were honorary life members of the Society for the Preservation of Historic Dwellings of Charleston (now the Preservation Society of Charleston).[5] They also performed new construction. During the expanse of the work the firm did over 300 projects from 1920-1972. The firm changed names over the years: Simons & Lapham; Simons, Lapham, Mitchell & Small; Simons, Mitchell, Small & Donahue; Mitchell, Small, Donahue & Logan; and Mitchell, Small & Donahue. The latter was in business as late as 2007.

Lapham was active in community service. He was a founding member of the South Carolina Society of Colonial Wars and designed their official seal. He was also a member of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge #242 (a lodge his father re organized), Carolina Yacht Club, The Charleston Club, Landmark Lodge #76 Ancient and Free Masons, Kiwanis Club, Saint Cecilia Society, Delta Lodge of Scottish Rite. He was a charter member of the South Carolina Mayflower Society. He joined the American Institute of Architects in 1923 serving as state president in 1936-1937. He was elected a Fellow in 1937 and Member Emeritus in 1955.[6]

Lapham married Lydia LaRoache Thomas in July 1926. They had Anne Soule Lapham (1929–2002), Samuel Thomas Lapham (1935–1943) and Samuel Peyre Lapham (living). Samuel Lapham VI is buried with his wife in Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Genealogical research of Ernest E. Blevins with birth, death and marriage records of the family; Lapham, History of the Lapham Family manuscript.
  2. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture of Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, p2-3.
  3. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, p 4-5.
  4. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, p 6-8
  5. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, p. 11.
  6. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture of Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, p. 10-11, 40-41.
  7. ^ Blevins, Documentation of the Architecture of Samuel Lapham and the Firm of Simons & Lapham, Master of Fine Arts in Historic Preservation Thesis, Savannah College of Art & Design, 2001, 9-10-12.

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