Samuel Petit

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Samuel Petit (Latin: Petitus) (1594 – 1653) was a French Huguenot pastor, known as a classical scholar and orientalist.[1]

Life[edit]

From Nîmes, the son of the pastor François Petit of Saint-Ambroix, and Noémi Ollivier, he studied oriental languages at Geneva from 1610 to 1612. He became professor of Greek at the Collège des Arts at Nîmes in 1615, and pastor there in the same year, a position he held for the rest of his life. He was principal at the Collège from 1627 to 1633.[2]

Works[edit]

  • Miscellaneorum libri novem (1630). This work includes Petit's speculation on organising the dialogues of Plato into sets of four.[3] It also included his attempted reconstruction of the Phoenician language.[4]
  • Eclogae chronologicae (1632)[5]
  • Variarum lectionum libri IV (1633); reprinted in Critici Sacri (1698 edition).[5]
  • Leges atticae (1635)[5]
  • Observationum libri III (1642)[5]
  • Diatribi de jure (1649)[5]
  • Traité concernant la réunion de Chrétiens (1670).[5]

Family[edit]

In 1620, Petit married Catherine Cheiron. Their surviving daughter Antoinette married the physician Pierre Formi.[6]

Petit brought up his orphaned nephew Samuel de Sorbière, whose mother Louisa was his sister.[7][8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Principes de politique applicables à tous les gouvernements représentatifs: (Texte de 1806). Walter de Gruyter. 27 January 2011. p. 932. ISBN 978-3-11-023447-3. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  2. ^ Suzanne Stelling-Michaud (1966). Le livre du Recteur de l'Académie de Genève (1559-1878) (in French). Librairie Droz. p. 148. ISBN 978-2-600-03196-7. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  3. ^ Gerald Alan Press (2000). Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 192 note 29. ISBN 978-0-8476-9219-4. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  4. ^ Zur Shalev (14 October 2011). Sacred Words and Worlds: Geography, Religion, and Scholarship, 1550-1700. BRILL. pp. 183 note 25. ISBN 978-90-04-20935-0. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Emile Haag (1858). La France protestante. rue St Dominique d' enfer. p. 205. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  6. ^ Abel Boyer (1871). L'académie protestante de Nimes et Samuel Petit: thèses. J. Vidallet. p. 26. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  7. ^ Cornelis W. Schoneveld (1983). Intertraffic of the Mind: Studies in Seventeenth-Century Anglo-Dutch Translation with a Checklist of Books Translated from English Into Dutch, 1600-1700. Brill Archive. p. 29. ISBN 978-90-04-06942-8. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  8. ^ The London encyclopaedia: or Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, comprising a popular view of the present state of knowledge. 1829. p. 623. Retrieved 3 September 2012.

External links[edit]