Samuel S. Conner

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Samuel Shepard Conner
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 19th district
In office
March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1817
Preceded by James Parker
Succeeded by Joshua Gage
Personal details
Born 1783
Exeter, New Hampshire
Died December 17, 1820
Covington, Kentucky
Political party Democratic-Republican
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Denniston[1]
Alma mater Phillips Exeter Academy, Yale College
Profession Attorney
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service March 12,[2] 1812[3]-July 14, 1814
Rank Major, Lieutenant Colonel
Commands Twenty-first Infantry, Thirteenth Infantry
Battles/wars War of 1812
Battle of York[2]

Samuel Shepard Conner (ca. 1783 – December 17, 1820) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts.

Born in Exeter, New Hampshire, Conner attended Phillips Exeter Academy in 1794. He was graduated from Yale College in 1806. He studied law.

Conner married Elizabeth Denniston of Albany, New York.[3] He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Waterville, Maine (at that time a district of Massachusetts), in 1810. Conner served in the War of 1812. Conner was first a Major of the Twenty-first Infantry. In the beginning of 1813 Conner served as Aide-de-camp to General Henry Dearborn.[3] He was one of the American officers who accepted the British surrender at the Battle of York.[2] He was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the Thirteenth Infantry March 12, 1813. He resigned July 14, 1814. He resumed the practice of law in Waterville, Maine.

Conner was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1817). He was appointed surveyor general of the Ohio land district in 1819. He died in Covington, Kentucky, December 17, 1820.

Sources[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
James Parker
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 19th congressional district

March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817
Succeeded by
Joshua Gage
Military offices
Preceded by
Major
of the Twenty-first Infantry

March 12, 1812 – March 12, 1813 [4]
Succeeded by
John Johnson[4]
Preceded by
Aide-de-camp to
General Henry Dearborn

1813 – 1813
Succeeded by
Preceded by
John Christie[5]
Lieutenant Colonel
of the Thirteenth Infantry

March 12, 1813– July 14, 1814
Succeeded by
R. N. Malcolm[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (1912), Biographical sketches of the graduates of Yale college with annals of the College History Vol VI, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, p. 24. 
  2. ^ a b c Coues, Elliott (1895), The expeditions of Zebulon Montgomery Pike: to headwaters of the Mississippi River, Volume 1, New York, N.Y.: Francis. P. Harper, p. ciii. 
  3. ^ a b c Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (1912), Biographical sketches of the graduates of Yale college with annals of the College History Vol VI, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, p. 23. 
  4. ^ a b Heitman, Francis Bernard (1890), Historical register of the United States Army: from its organization, Washington, D.C: The National Tribune, p. 60. 
  5. ^ Powell, William Henry (1900), List of officers of the army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, New York, N.Y.: L. R. Hamersly & Co., p. 53. 
  6. ^ Heitman, Francis Bernard (1890), Historical register of the United States Army: from its organization, Washington, D.C: The National Tribune, p. 53. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.